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Author Topic: Waterfalls  (Read 1808 times)
larsrc
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« on: June 09, 2010, 05:08:14 AM »
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Nice article, Mark. An interesting idea with inclusion/exclusion, which I'm looking forward to trying out. Isn't there a risk that one ends up at somewhere between "optimum image" and "falls apart" if there is a slightly less that optimum composition in between? Or when you say "falls apart", do you mean "becomes noticably worse"?

It doesn't surprise me that the left-to-right falling image was good. Yes, in many other contexts a left-to-right rising diagonal is preferred as it implies growth, positivity etc, but for a waterfall we expect, well, a fall. So when we (Westerners) read it left-to-right, having a rising diagonal is counterintuitive. Unless we happen upon one of the rare waterrises:)

-Lars
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fredjeang
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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2010, 05:44:05 AM »
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Yes I enjoyed it too.

And another great Michael's pic.

The Phase 65 is just amazing, I imagine the great satisfaction, shooting landscapes or arquitecture when viewing
on screen and printing.
For the breathing animals, wich is what I do 95%, I think it is maybe too much resolution, because then I suspect
that this could be more suitable for a dermathologist studdies.

With the P65, (not talking about numbers theory but eyes perception), what is the limit in print size before the image
quality is starting to falling appart ?(thinking that the watcher woul stand at about 2, or 3 meters from the pic).
Is it reasonable to expect 2/3 meters print size?

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fike
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2010, 02:28:45 PM »
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As I read the article, I was struck by the fact that the waterfall images that hold-up longest for me have other subject-matter to hold the image together, while preventing it becoming cliche.

I am an eastern woodland photographer.  this gem sat unused in my archive for a couple years before I rediscovered it.  I think it is a good example of inclusion/exclusion.  

http://marcshaffer.net/fine-art-panoramics...reek-falls.html

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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
vgogolak
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« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2010, 06:18:56 PM »
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Mark

Well thought out. I really enjoy your work. Waterfalls are a subliminal 'pull' often. I notice on last years Mt Blanc trip I shot over 50 images of a couple dozen waterfalls (mountains and melting snow will do it all the time!  :-)
What I find is that I prefer LIGHT, simply because I want to see the water struggleover the rock. The longer exposures have a calming feel, but I kind of like the drama, as in this one.
Your comment on perspective is interesting; waterfalls usually have some restrictions (I did an 'over the falls" shot video of Niagara from CA side, and it is REALLY dramatic, but not for the vertiginous)

Anyway, you provoke thought and that is what I find beneficial from the commentaries...


Victor

[attachment=22519:normal_C...501_1246.jpg]
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DaveCurtis
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2010, 04:06:50 PM »
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Yes, I enjoyed the artcle to.

To photographer, a waterfall is almost like some kind of drug. Whether it be a tourist with the point and shoot or a pro with their Phase One. You have to take that shoot!



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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2010, 07:32:34 AM »
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I agree with the concept that the composition of a photo with a waterfall can use the waterfall as an element rather than the subject for a less cliched view.


Dettifoss, Iceland.


Thing is though as anyone who has photographed a waterfall will know, especially when alone and not hemmed in by tourists or photo tourists, you can't begin to do justice to the noise, the rushing water, the feeling of passing time that is there at a waterfall in beautiful surroundings. You need to sit there, for hours even with your thoughts and just appreciate it. A photo or even a video of a waterfall, however good, is only a very small and very 2D rendition of something far greater...
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 07:33:38 AM by Ben Rubinstein » Logged

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