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Author Topic: San Cristobal de las Casas  (Read 4232 times)
Andres Bonilla
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« on: June 15, 2010, 12:06:26 PM »
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Old man in Chiapas. I am trying again different post styles. I know you like or you do not but I would love to have some feed back.
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Ed Blagden
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« Reply #1 on: June 15, 2010, 12:42:58 PM »
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I like I like I like!

The combination of lighting and post processing somehow gives it the look of a Dutch Master.  The subject is good, too.

Super shot - well done.

Ed
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2010, 12:51:39 PM »
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Quote from: Ed Blagden
I like I like I like!

The combination of lighting and post processing somehow gives it the look of a Dutch Master.  The subject is good, too.

Super shot - well done.

Ed

What Ed said - me too.

Well done.

Mike.
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2010, 02:25:57 PM »
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Excellent - taking the art of image making back to centuries before photography... and yes, that is good!
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seamus finn
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2010, 03:46:43 PM »
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Oh yes!
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RSL
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« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2010, 04:32:23 PM »
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Andres, Yes! Bravo! That's a fine piece of work. The subtle tonal distribution and the subdued colors make the picture. Of course, the subject has something to do with that too. Again, bravo!
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2010, 05:52:45 PM »
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I agree with all the others. I like the painterly effect a lot. It really works, and its a powerful portrait.

Eric

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tom b
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« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2010, 07:10:14 PM »
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Sorry, I find this type of photography to be offensive. Making peoples skin look worse that it actually is for some type of pseudo artistic affect is not on. This type of photography was popular in the 70s and it should stay there. Let people age with dignity. I bet you if you showed him this image he wouldn't be too impressed. If it were me, I wouldn't.

Cheers,
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EduPerez
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« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2010, 12:50:13 AM »
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I liked it very much! If I could change something, I would try to "clean" some zones where the texture looks to be "covering" the subject (right hand, left shoulder, top of hat, ...).
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tom b
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« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2010, 01:30:55 AM »
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I'd like to see an untouched original to see how much damage you've done to this guys image. Honestly, you wouldn't be giving the same treatment to some white guy from Boston. In my opinion this image shows a total lack of respect for this individual.

Cheers,

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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2010, 08:38:00 AM »
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Quote from: tom  b
I'd like to see an untouched original to see how much damage you've done to this guys image. Honestly, you wouldn't be giving the same treatment to some white guy from Boston. In my opinion this image shows a total lack of respect for this individual.

Cheers,


Sir..As to your remarks/opinion, here and in your previous remark I simply can not believe we are looking at the same portrait...and yes, I have moved it over onto a large calibrated moniter...

As an example of an environmental portrait (see the portrait work of Arnold Newman for an understanding of environmental portrait as intended here) I find, and believe many could not help but to find this outstanding...

as for my opinion...and this coming from a common woman whose heavy outdoor use and advanced age has her own superfluous shell headed in the same direction... this portrait goes for me beyond a technically and aesthetically and emotionally fine environmental portrait...it comes across powerfully as reverent....and I believe this man and his reverence for life and his life work would softly smile and look at the photographer through clear eyes, and say to himself...this man "gets it"  this man" knows and feels who I am...."   reverent...

...just an old woman's opinion though...

Pat
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A common woman...

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fredjeang
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« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2010, 10:56:33 AM »
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As first a painter and now photographer, and being surrownded in my daily life by fashion photographers, retouchers etc...I can assume that I'm pretty in favor of heavy Photoshop retouching.
That said, when I first saw this image I did not feel comfortable. Something was telling me that it is nicely post produced, in a "painter way", although I find it too pushed for that subject, but tech is indeed
mastered. But I also felt something similar to what Tom B pointed.
This is what we call in french "effectiste" and easy to like or if you prefer, not easy to dislike.
But there is also an approach in that image that I'm not convinced, not that much from a technical point of view.

As for the reference being expressed about the similitude with Arnold Newman, I don't agree. Arnold portraits are generally made such a way that the subject is actually looking at him,
or there is enough information to deduct that there was a real dialog and awareness of the photographic act.
I don't feel that dialog pseleyimages expressed here between the photographer and the subject. But I trust you, if you said you felt it is because you felt it. I did not.

To me Tom's touched a point.
But in my understanding, there is no vulgarity or discremination in the name of image effect. I see an honest attempt to do something beautifull.
I'm closer to Edu in the sense that it is somewhere overprocessed, but this is also very very common, unless really really experienced retouchers.
So, offensive? I don't think so.

This is not my cup of tea, too effectist, but this is finally an interesting proposal that just need to mature more IMO, then the poster might really got something strong.
But the gap between a great image and what Tom's said is very narrow...in that case.

I don't think Andres crossed the deadline.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 11:45:51 AM by fredjeang » Logged
fredjeang
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« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2010, 11:36:02 AM »
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sorry, doubled post
« Last Edit: June 16, 2010, 11:37:09 AM by fredjeang » Logged
tokengirl
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« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2010, 12:36:28 PM »
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I think the image is great.  But a simple B&W would have seemed more natural to me?

I love Photoshop as much as anyone, but I think the treatment here is just too much.  There is so much "effect" going on that it almost looks like Scott Kelby threw up on your photo.  Don't misunderstand me, I don't see any problem with your techniques, they are well executed.  But I think this is a case where less would have been more.

Again, I really do think the image itself is great.
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2010, 12:54:27 PM »
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Quote from: Ed Blagden
I like I like I like!

The combination of lighting and post processing somehow gives it the look of a Dutch Master.  The subject is good, too.

Super shot - well done.

Ed

Hi Ed, thanks for your reply! Yes, this is a style I have been trying to develop; I have always loved the use of light and shadows in some of the paintings of the past.

Thanks
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2010, 12:55:07 PM »
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Quote from: wolfnowl
What Ed said - me too.

Well done.

Mike.
Thanks Mike! I ma glad you like it.
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2010, 12:59:39 PM »
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Quote from: Dick Roadnight
Excellent - taking the art of image making back to centuries before photography... and yes, that is good!
Thank you! Here is one of my first pieces with the same style.
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #17 on: June 16, 2010, 01:00:56 PM »
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Quote from: seamus finn
Oh yes!
Ha,ha oH yes!! but I knew butr for some peole it is..oh nooooo!
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #18 on: June 16, 2010, 01:05:40 PM »
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Quote from: RSL
Andres, Yes! Bravo! That's a fine piece of work. The subtle tonal distribution and the subdued colors make the picture. Of course, the subject has something to do with that too. Again, bravo!
Thanks Russ! I am including the original since usually the treatment of the photo begs for the original. I know some photographers would prefer the original but it is good for comparisons
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #19 on: June 16, 2010, 01:10:36 PM »
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Quote from: Eric Myrvaagnes
I agree with all the others. I like the painterly effect a lot. It really works, and its a powerful portrait.

Eric
Thanks Eric! I am still working this particular style, some are more photographic than others. Here is one that is less painterly but around the same intent.
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