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Author Topic: Mat Cutter Recommendation  (Read 11622 times)
EA6B
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« Reply #20 on: July 10, 2010, 11:30:20 PM »
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Take a look at Alto's as well...

http://www.altosezmat.com/
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Dward
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« Reply #21 on: July 11, 2010, 08:27:36 AM »
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I think the choice of mat cutter is almost entirely a matter of how many mats you'll be doing per day (or week).   The best ones (Fletcher, Easterly, Valiani, Phaedra Chronomat, C&H, Keencut Ultimat Gold) are more convenient than the less expensive Logan and Alto cutters, but the latter will produce mats of the same quality.   I've managed to collect a number of cutters over the years, including a 60" C&H (very heavy to operate), a Phaedra Chronomat that I think is perhaps a bit better than the Fletcher (it's certainly flashier in appearance), two different Alto's systems, and an Albin Infinity (now out of business, but uses C&H parts and blades).  I'd never attempt to use the Alto as a production machine, but even this least expensive alternative cuts great mats.   If price is no object, the Easterly, the Fletcher, the Chronomat, and Valiani are the best, but not at all necessary unless one is doing many mats per week.  

David V. Ward, Ph. D.
www.dvward.com
David V. Ward Fine Art Photography  

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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2010, 10:06:48 AM »
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You might want check out this web site.


http://www.framing4yourself.com/shop/products/mat-cutters/
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Bill Koenig,
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« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2010, 11:54:29 AM »
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Fwiw I went down the same decision path, got a f-t 2200 and taught myself how to cut mats with it. It is a *great* tool.

Whatever you get, keep the cutter in tune, always use sharp blades (it'll let you know when you've waited too long), measure precisely and they'll all give you a perfect cut every time.

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Phil Indeblanc
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« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2010, 01:38:17 PM »
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I also had a Logan, and it was a cheap maybe $150 or so. I think you can get a good cutter for around $300. No need to spend $1500 or what ever unless you are a frame shop turning out lots of mattes that require custom cut styles and so forth.  Yes one on a rail is surely better, but it is also expensive.  If you are doing even a 2 or 5 mats a day, and all you want is a straight or bevel,you are fine with a simple cutter.  I have the Fletcher and ya it is a amazing tool, but it is overkill. I had the budget at the time and that was that. If you ever needed to cut glass or any other hard substraights a wall Fletcher would serve you well. But these are pro tools and you can easily spend $2000 for one.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 01:43:07 PM by Phil Indeblanc » Logged

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Ronny Nilsen
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« Reply #25 on: July 14, 2010, 03:45:24 PM »
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Quote from: Bill Koenig
You might want check out this web site.


http://www.framing4yourself.com/shop/products/mat-cutters/

the Logan 850  Platinum Edge seems to be an improvement on the Logan 650 Framer's Edge I have. The 650 works OK and does all it needs to do, but I would buy something else if I was doing many mats. But for my need the 650 is OK for now.

Ronny
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JimGoshorn
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« Reply #26 on: July 14, 2010, 03:58:28 PM »
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Quote from: Ronny Nilsen
the Logan 850  Platinum Edge seems to be an improvement on the Logan 650 Framer's Edge I have. The 650 works OK and does all it needs to do, but I would buy something else if I was doing many mats. But for my need the 650 is OK for now.

That's why the decision is difficult. I have usually found that if I buy something that has more features than what I need right now, I will end up happier and able to use the item longer.

Jim
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