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Author Topic: Processing 5x4 B&W Film in a Paterson 3 Reel Tank Workaround I've designed  (Read 27045 times)
MorganODonovan
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« on: July 11, 2010, 04:19:57 PM »
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Hey All,

I don't know about all of you, but my lab in London is now charging 5.50/sheet to process my B&W 5x4 film, which is becoming very expensive.

As i love shooting this film for portraits I've been working on a way to do it in a Paterson tank.  Not the TACO method but a proper work around.

I've come up with this solution-









It is working very well for me, but there are a few things to note.

Gentle agitation

Load it with 6 sheets

Load with the emulsion side in

If you would like one I've a few that I've made on ebay-

5x4 Processor Plates On Ebay

Any thoughts or comments,

Let me know,

Morgan
« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 06:47:46 PM by MorganODonovan » Logged
Theresa
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2010, 05:46:22 AM »
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I used to tray develop, if I were to go back to LF I would certainly do it again.  I liked the control it offered.
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patrickfransdesmet
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 02:20:16 PM »
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well it is a nice tool to process 6 sheets at once
but the main advantage of sheets is to be able to process them individually

I prefer development in trays and using green light (night goggles) to actually SEE de development
This is GREAT !


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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 07:57:40 PM »
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Quote from: Theresa
I used to tray develop, if I were to go back to LF I would certainly do it again.  I liked the control it offered.

Me too. I struggled with hangers in rectangular tanks for a while but could never get even development. Once I switched to trays it was soon easy to get perfectly even and consistent development with up to twelve sheets at a time.


Ah, the good old days before digital!

Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
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« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2010, 03:47:38 PM »
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Well I think it looks like a great idea Morgan. Good luck with it.

Steve
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Kumar
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« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2010, 09:08:06 PM »
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You should post this on the LF Forum and APUG, if you haven't already done so.

Kumar
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WalterEG
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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2011, 06:42:31 PM »
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I can vouch for Morgan's film holders.  I recently purchased two and find them a facile alternative to Jobo 2509Ns when I don't have many sheets to put through.

I use Diafine two-bath developer and the entire workflow goes swimmingly.

Cheers,

Walter
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2011, 11:56:58 AM »
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We used to push through b/w in those large, black Kodak (?) tanks with floating lids to conserve the solutions when not being used. The films were clipped onto frames and then placed onto a sort of rack thing that you could lift up and down, much like frying potato chips. Real chips. Do them in virgin olive oil and you'll never look at a bought one again.

Our colour stuff went through small stainless steel tanks called Dallon, of Daler, or something similar. I can't remember the 'boss' or anyone else noticing uneven development. As for safelight, we used lots of panchromatic film so it was total darkness. No trouble at all as long as you have no fear of the dark. Incidently, don't ever use strip lights in a darkroom: they glow for ages even when you think they are off.

Line film we did in the red.

Walter: welcome aboard! You'll find a couple of folks you may remember from way back.

Rob C
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