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Author Topic: Approaching Magazines  (Read 2670 times)
RomainVaucher
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« on: July 31, 2010, 11:39:55 AM »
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Hi,

I am working for some smaller magazines that contacted me and asked me to shoot editorials for them. I shoot mostly fashion.

I would like to work for some bigger magazines. How to do that ? Is it better to go there and just show your book ? Or is it better to go there with a submission ?

How did you first approached magazines in order to get some work ? What are big "no-go's" ?

Is it better to try and contact the fashion editor ? or somebody else ?

I am talking about semi - big magazines (not elle, vogue, etc...). To get a foot in before I go and try to get the big ones

Thanks in advance,

R.
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pcunite
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 07:06:26 PM »
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Quote from: RomainVaucher
I am working for some smaller magazines that contacted me and asked me to shoot editorials for them. I shoot mostly fashion.  I would like to work for some bigger magazines. How to do that? Is it better to go there and just show your book? Or is it better to go there with a submission?

This could be a good thread. I hope you get lots of feedback.

I work fulltime for an upstart online magazine local to my area. I shoot editorials for businesses, different aspects of their business, products, etc and such, then the president, senior staff, etc. Everything shown on the site is high-end. I got the job because of my previous work and skillset, okay, okay, I know one of the owners...

What are you currently shooting in relation to editorals? Before a big mag wants you, why do the small ones want you. I mean I want to know this myself, if you're shooting fashion in a studio why did they want you to do editorals lit on a customer's site?
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RomainVaucher
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« Reply #2 on: August 02, 2010, 05:01:10 AM »
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I am shooting fashion editorials. Beautiful girls and great designers  

I am working for online fashion magazines. One of the editor that contacted me said he liked my style and gave me 16 pages to fill.  

I hope to get some feedback too
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RomainVaucher
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« Reply #3 on: August 02, 2010, 05:01:32 AM »
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*double post*
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 05:01:53 AM by RomainVaucher » Logged
fredjeang
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« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2010, 01:22:07 PM »
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Still there: http://www.lebook.com/gb/
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OwenR
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« Reply #5 on: August 04, 2010, 02:02:00 AM »
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Quote from: RomainVaucher
Hi,

I am working for some smaller magazines that contacted me and asked me to shoot editorials for them. I shoot mostly fashion.

I would like to work for some bigger magazines. How to do that ? Is it better to go there and just show your book ? Or is it better to go there with a submission ?

How did you first approached magazines in order to get some work ? What are big "no-go's" ?

Is it better to try and contact the fashion editor ? or somebody else ?

I am talking about semi - big magazines (not elle, vogue, etc...). To get a foot in before I go and try to get the big ones

Thanks in advance,

R.

Interesting topic.

My view is that if you can approach through some other channel than a portfolio viewing, then it helps. It's obviously harder with high production value fashion magazines, but pitching a submission is a great intro, can show that you're already working at the required level, and can lead to building a relationship with the appropriate people and at the very least help in getting a portfolio viewing. I work in a different field - architecture/interiors - but in the past have often gone to magazines with a story I thought they may be interested in, and offered to help in any way possible whether or not they wanted that particular story in the end. By that point you should hopefully have exchanged enough emails/phone calls that you can contact them again without seeming like a stranger. Certainly, in this part of the industry building relationships with the right people is the way to go (linkedin is great for finding out who knows who), working with startup magazines to get work published and on the shelves, and then targeting a few choice publications over a period of months (or as long as it takes) to place your best work with them when they eventually give you a shot, and thereby moving up a level over time.

I'd love to hear people's experiences/suggestions on how to pitch stories, whether successful or not.
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fredjeang
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« Reply #6 on: August 04, 2010, 07:45:17 AM »
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Romain, personal contacts are the most important.
You have to move in the right circles and with the right persons.
Mobile phone and portfolio in the mobile is more important than a physical portfolio.

Contacts are the clew.
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