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Author Topic: Motivation  (Read 27202 times)
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #60 on: August 09, 2010, 02:35:11 PM »
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Quote from: Rob C
But I shall still refuse to wear my undies on the outside!

Rob C

Sir, you have no respect for Tradition!


Eric

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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Steve Kennedy-Williams
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« Reply #61 on: August 11, 2010, 02:41:07 PM »
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I've recently upgraded to a DSLR, and have thought about why I bought it and why I shoot.

1. To capture memories. Snapshots of family and friends. Most have a shelf life of a week or two but do give pleasure.

2. To force myself to see what is around me. Taking photographs as i go about my life pulls me out of my assumptions of what is around me. At times, this forced reevaluation has led to some beautiful photos.

Of these, the second is my primary motivating force. Whether the results of this process are good is subjective, but the process of creating art (intent) makes me a better person.
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RSL
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« Reply #62 on: August 14, 2010, 05:04:08 PM »
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The trouble with saying this is that it can be construed as an attack on wedding shooters. Rob C

Rob, I should have caught this one earlier. I must tell you that I have a high regard for wedding shooters, just as I have a high regard for plumbers, carpenters, electricians, etc. They're the folks who keep things running. Without them we'd be in deep do-do. Two of my best friends are, or were, wedding photographers. I shot weddings myself for a while back in the sixties, though as in your case, it just wasn't my thing. But, like plumbing, somebody has to do this kind of work.
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michswiss
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« Reply #63 on: August 17, 2010, 09:21:30 AM »
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Steve, I became serious about my photography again around four years ago.  I didn't know if the desire would really sustain itself so I didn't invest must in kit at the time.   Much of the initial motivation was similar to your second as well.  It was certainly motivation enough to convince me to move into dSLR and reinvest in good glass.  But what I found out was that I needed more that just learning to see what other's might overlook.  I needed to tell stories; single images, short essays, longer projects.


I've recently upgraded to a DSLR, and have thought about why I bought it and why I shoot.

1. To capture memories. Snapshots of family and friends. Most have a shelf life of a week or two but do give pleasure.

2. To force myself to see what is around me. Taking photographs as i go about my life pulls me out of my assumptions of what is around me. At times, this forced reevaluation has led to some beautiful photos.

Of these, the second is my primary motivating force. Whether the results of this process are good is subjective, but the process of creating art (intent) makes me a better person.
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #64 on: August 28, 2010, 07:52:05 AM »
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I am a little late to joining this discussion, which seems like little more than a missing passion in Rob C. If I may make a few comments of my own:


I need to make one point about street photography before I leave the discussion. Eric hit the nail on the head when he said, "It generally leaves me unmoved unless it displays some significant relationship..." That's exactly what good street photography does, and when it does, it's what I call "art." Good street photography conveys information about the human condition that you can't put into words -- unless, possibly, you're a very, very good novelist or poet. I think it's difficult almost to the point of impossibility to do that in any other photographic genre.

Russ, this statement is true of all good photography; essentially it is a default back to the adage: "A picture's worth a thousand words." Perhaps an addendum could be made, "A great picture cannot be quantified into words." This is as true of a beautifully-captured sunset as it is of a serendipitous capture of a unique human expression or moment: there is a capture of something emotional or moving that cannot be described in any other way, but just to behold it and enjoy it.




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One thing is for sure, banging on here about travelling, making images and the art of photography results in absolutely nothing. At least those tourists are showing an interest and getting out there and actually doing it.
Rant over.
For now...

Keith, I agree with you. I notice there is an infectious pathology here where too many worry about "what others do" (or don't do), and why, instead of just concentrating on doing their own thing for their own reasons.




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I stand by my observations: tourism is a poison that kills without you noticing.
Rob C

Actually, Rob, the real truth is cities full of people in general are a poison to this world ... and are spreading and killing our world with their over-abundance, their waste, and their wanton disregard for trampling what's left of the unspoiled natural beauty of this world. But that's a whole other subject.

Regarding the subject of motivation, at least the photographer tries to appreciate what is beautiful this world by capturing it with his camera.

To me, the whole point of photography is never-ending effort to appreciate and capture the beauty of our world, be that beauty found in the lands, the skies, the seas, the creatures, or the people of this world. The photographer is forever trying to capture something beautiful, or something emotionally/spiritually-moving to him, and therefore this passion to be moved is what forever drives him.




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Interesting question.  I, for one, take pictures avidly when traveling or on vacation.  However, I do the same in my own city, NYC, as well as the surrounding urban and more rural areas.  My actions come from a pair of parallel fascinations.  First is with experience: experience of my surroundings, the people in them, the man-made elements in them and nature's final say on both of those.  Second is with the experience of photography, which for better or worse has been a drive in my life since age 4 or 5.
I enjoy the process of seeing.  This includes things new to me as well as things very familiar to me.  I enjoy the process of reaching for my camera when I see something that says something to me, and that "something" is not always expressable in words although sometimes it is, too.  I enjoy the challenge of making my camera (not 6, but 8 megapixels) through composing and then postprocessing and printing, capture the essence of what moved me when I saw the scene.  I am particularly moved by contrasts in time, contradictions, our impact on nature, and the reverse: nature's impact on us.
I enjoy seeing something in the familiar that many others overlook.  I enjoy finding the beauty in a scene that many would consider ugly, and vice-versa.  When I shoot a record shot I try to capture the angle and perspective that will later remind me
and perhaps show others, how I saw what I saw.  I also enjoy, sometimes many years later, the memories of the experience evoked when I occasionally review my old pictures.
I have stood on the observation deck of the Empire State Building and enjoyed the company of tourists from all over the world, sometimes helping them spot sights that they are looking for to shoot, and the exchanges have always been gratifying. When I travel, I have found as a tourist that local people are eager to show me what they consider impaortant to see in their area.
When I see all those people, arms extended and eyes squinting at almost-dimmed out LCD's, I realize that there is a love of photography that makes it so popular, and it can be considered a democratization of art.
I also admire the amateur painter whom I pass at the ramp from Riverside Drive to the GW Bridge, who paints the same buildings every time I observe him.  I also see, while I am photographing the power of the sea and rocks off Ocean Point, Maine, the same straw-hatted lady, year after year, who paints the "same" ocean scene, just for the sheer enjoyment of translating what her inner eye senses about that scene into physical movement and feel of brush and paint on textured canvas.
Yes, I don't mind selling my prints, either.  But the urge to shoot is very longstanding, and I would not be surprised to find that many of those tourists with point-and-shoots experience some of the same joys, with some of the same motivations, that I experience.

This was a great post. I think a true photographer is somebody who "has" to capture photos because something inside him compels him to do so.

I walk around my property every day (50 acres of Florida wilderness) taking hundreds of photos (most of which I just throw away), just because I love taking photos. I am getting much better at my skills, and yet I still realize I have a long way to go. But none of this matters when I am out there, because I simply enjoy doing it more than anything else. Case in point: I was on the way out the door yesterday, dressed nicely for an appointment, and I happened to see a Great Purple Hairstreak butterfly as I was walking toward my car. I hadn't seen this species in over 2 years, despite uncountable forays into nature, both on my propert and through many Florida State Parks. So I immediately dropped everything in my hands, quickly got my camera, and I proceded to take over 60 pictures of this tiny, beautiful creature ... until it flew away for good. Throughout the process, I had to get on my knees and elbows in the dirt for some shots, and I had to chase it far off into the woods for others, until it simply took off for good. By the time I was done, I had to change my clothes and was unpardonably late to my appointment, but the ability to capture that animal to camera was the only thing I thought about all day long after the fact.

Another person might not have cared, might not have even noticed, but I did notice and I did care very much. Everything was forgotten except the beauty of that animal and my chance to capture it here and now. To me, that is the essence of photography, with different people having different subjects that inspire and drive them to shoot.


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Rob, at the risk of getting personal, you seem to be a perpetual cynic, questioning everything, even your own motivation. You seem to worry too much about what "other people think/do," and/or how something may "look." There is only one thing over which you have complete control and that is you. Questioning your motives can be good, but wallowing in self-questioning is a sign of impotence, a lack of passion. What are you passionate about? If you are passionate about nothing, the real question should be WHY have you lost your passion, and what elements to your life might inspire passion in you?

Once you have a true passion for something, the rest of these silly little questions and self-doubts will instantly become irrelevant.

Jack



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Rob C
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« Reply #65 on: August 28, 2010, 02:58:49 PM »
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Rob, at the risk of getting personal, you seem to be a perpetual cynic, questioning everything, even your own motivation. You seem to worry too much about what "other people think/do," and/or how something may "look." There is only one thing over which you have complete control and that is you. Questioning your motives can be good, but wallowing in self-questioning is a sign of impotence, a lack of passion. What are you passionate about? If you are passionate about nothing, the real question should be WHY have you lost your passion, and what elements to your life might inspire passion in you?

Once you have a true passion for something, the rest of these silly little questions and self-doubts will instantly become irrelevant.

Jack

...

Interesting how differently two people can read a single mind.

I see no problem with a thread such as this one – after all, if it were not so, then no answers to it would have been forthcoming. Even you felt obliged to contribute.

Now, motivation for shooting butterflies may be all very well, but they are either available or they are not, and you seldom have to pay them. My personal interest, on the other hand, is the same one that drew me into the job in the first instance: working with beautiful women, professional models. And there’s the rub: you gotta pay them, if you can find them. And none of those good ones are into prints for time deals and I have no need for the other kind of girl. Neither are they generally willing to do stock, so that route is also out as well as being a ruined business model anyway.

Long retired, there is no natural way that the experience is going to return, indeed, it becomes more unlikely every day.

So, accepting the status quo for what it is, I have to look for something else to spark my mind into action, or, at least, to awaken some other desire that might be dormant somewhere deep within. If it exists, I can’t find the damn thing, and it isn’t landscape, cityscape, the sea, the trees, the rocks, the plants nor four-legged friends. Even horses with flowing white manes don’t cut it. You see the problem.

But, as far as “what others think or do” it does interest me very much; I am interested in some people, particularly other photographers, and really do find their work, sites and published works of great interest. I am absolutely interested in hearing/reading what others who have travelled the same paths as I have to say. Why on Earth would I not find other fashion or calendar shooters interesting? I never join clubs, but that one, by default, is one that I would!

You have not had the life experience that I have had. You will probably never realise the buzz from working in those two genres when they are exactly what you have wanted to do all your adult (and teen) life. Fred Gasc, who I believe is currently on holiday, saw that at once, but then he has had experience of that sort of photography; it is so much more than just clicking a shutter, making a pretty composition; it's the creation of a fleeting fantasy for two, it’s something you can never willingly let go. People have died because that work has left their lives. There is a tragic list of such people and I can tell you seriously that it isn’t difficult to understand why they did what they did; the more success the more is lost when your star wanes, as it usually will.

But hell, you have to be there to read it.

Ciao -

Rob C





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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #66 on: August 28, 2010, 09:59:38 PM »
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Interesting how differently two people can read a single mind.

Everything looks different from different angles ...



I see no problem with a thread such as this one – after all, if it were not so, then no answers to it would have been forthcoming. Even you felt obliged to contribute.

Touché

My point was to suggest it is better to discover & pursue a passion rather than to lament a lack of it.




Now, motivation for shooting butterflies may be all very well, but they are either available or they are not, and you seldom have to pay them. My personal interest, on the other hand, is the same one that drew me into the job in the first instance: working with beautiful women, professional models. And there’s the rub: you gotta pay them, if you can find them. And none of those good ones are into prints for time deals and I have no need for the other kind of girl. Neither are they generally willing to do stock, so that route is also out as well as being a ruined business model anyway.

Actually, there are plenty of women who will model for free. I can't remember the online resource, but it was one where amateur models would willingly pose for free, for amateur photographers, so long as the amateur photographer agreed to give the model photos of herself. In other words, while the amateur photographer gets to develop his own "model" portfolio for free ... the amateur model gets to build her own portfolio with free pictures of herself.

Surely there is beauty to be enjoyed in this world other than from beautiful models. If I didn't have butterflies, it would be flowers, or clouds, or the sea. I remember when one boardmember posted beautiful macro shots of snow and ice that he took, when he was stuck in the snow during the winter months. There is always something to enjoy, if one is seeking joy. Same as there is always something to lament, if one is seeking sorrow.

I believe it was Churchill who said, "An optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty; the pessimest sees the difficulty in every opportunity."

Bring your mind around to the positive side ...




Long retired, there is no natural way that the experience is going to return, indeed, it becomes more unlikely every day.

Reminds me once of what an old man told me a few years back; he said: "Jack, when a man gets to be my age, he don't need no Viagra ... what he needs is young &@$$*"




So, accepting the status quo for what it is, I have to look for something else to spark my mind into action, or, at least, to awaken some other desire that might be dormant somewhere deep within. If it exists, I can’t find the damn thing, and it isn’t landscape, cityscape, the sea, the trees, the rocks, the plants nor four-legged friends. Even horses with flowing white manes don’t cut it. You see the problem.

I do see the problem, Rob, it's Churchill's definition of pessimism. It's also reactivism.

Rather than looking at all the opportunities, you're looking at all the difficulties. Rather than sparking yourself into action, you're waiting for something out there to "spark you" into action.




But, as far as “what others think or do” it does interest me very much; I am interested in some people, particularly other photographers, and really do find their work, sites and published works of great interest. I am absolutely interested in hearing/reading what others who have travelled the same paths as I have to say. Why on Earth would I not find other fashion or calendar shooters interesting? I never join clubs, but that one, by default, is one that I would!

I agree with you on considering what your peers might have to say or do on similar subjects as you. What I disagree on is "worrying" about what others think or do, most especially about the volume of "other photographers" or "tourists" might out there and what they might be doing. I think it is very productive to gain creative perspective/ideas from peers; but I think it is unproductive to curse the volume of "other photographers" and such that there are in this world.




You have not had the life experience that I have had. You will probably never realise the buzz from working in those two genres when they are exactly what you have wanted to do all your adult (and teen) life. Fred Gasc, who I believe is currently on holiday, saw that at once, but then he has had experience of that sort of photography; it is so much more than just clicking a shutter, making a pretty composition; it's the creation of a fleeting fantasy for two, it’s something you can never willingly let go. People have died because that work has left their lives. There is a tragic list of such people and I can tell you seriously that it isn’t difficult to understand why they did what they did; the more success the more is lost when your star wanes, as it usually will.

Well, as someone who grew up in Los Angeles and was in or around Hollywood/Beverly Hills most of my life, I understand the "addiction" that such a lifestyle can bring. Me personally, I think "addiction" is a good word to describe it, for the effects are like a drug: feels good, but it's unhealthy. I have always been more of a health nut than a lover of that lifestyle, and I personally far prefer peace and serenity. Can't really stand to be in the city for too long, quite frankly, and I feel unsettled being around any kind of a "fast paced" lifestyle. But that is just me.

By the tone of the above, it sounds like I hit the nail on the head with the lack of passion left and a resulting general pessimism in your outlook. I sure don't wish you any ill will Rob ... and (speaking of age, life experience, and stars) I sure hope you realize some day that all that glitters isn't necessarily gold. Sometimes it's fool's gold. Honestly, I never knew of a "buzz" that didn't come with a price. IMO, there are plenty of healthier things to devote one's time to, and there are an infinite number of other things to get passionate about in this life.




But hell, you have to be there to read it.
Ciao -
Rob C

Well, Rob, you sound kind of deflated. You really shouldn't be. You obviously have talent, you have experience, and you have the ability to write exceptionally well. There are a thousand different things you could devote your talents and energies to that would be worthwhile, perhaps more worthwhile ultimately than anything you have ever devoted yourself to so far. You just have to focus on all the possibilities, not on all of the difficulties.

Best of luck to you,

Jack




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Rob C
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« Reply #67 on: August 29, 2010, 03:42:33 AM »
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Well, Rob, you sound kind of deflated. You really shouldn't be. You obviously have talent, you have experience, and you have the ability to write exceptionally well. There are a thousand different things you could devote your talents and energies to that would be worthwhile, perhaps more worthwhile ultimately than anything you have ever devoted yourself to so far. You just have to focus on all the possibilities, not on all of the difficulties.

Best of luck to you,

Jack




Well, if that last paragraph doesn't move it, then nothing will!

I have to admit, I instantly recognize the difficulties in everything; until now I'd seen that as a sort of self-preservation mechanism... maybe I was mistaken.

Thanks for your time and views.

Rob C
 
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Rob C
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« Reply #68 on: August 30, 2010, 08:49:23 AM »
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Update to the above.

Thinking it the dawn of a new era, pour moi, the somewhat unexpected drizzle that greeted me this morning came like a signal from heaven. Yes! Summer is dying and fresh seasons await! So, I filled the black, virgin Lowepro Stealth Reporter D200 AW with a D700 and 24mm for the very first time and went off to lunch, with the grand intention of doing my version of the Café de Flore shot that has grinned out at me from the cover of Paris Mon Amour (sorry, Jeanloup, but gotta try, and as this is Spain and not Paris, then perhaps plagiarism doesn't come into it...); I even took along an umbrella so that nothing could stop me.

Obviously, by the time I had eaten in one establishment run by an expat Frenchman and moved on to the one in the town square where the non-action of the empty tables was to be re-enacted, the friggin' summer was back.

So, what do I think of the bag? First of all, the pad on the shoulder strap slides all over the place, and I spent much walking time shifting the damn combination this way and that. Secondly, the multiplicity of pockets inside it (I had removed the main spacer so that the camera could go in) caused real difficulties when I tried to find my mobile and also my wallet.

Conclusion 1. As I had feared all along, a new departure (that used to be the name of a brand of American bicycle brakes - you peddled backwards to stop) into 'steet' is going to demand more equipment; more expensive hardware is de rigueur, at least an M body - probably film - and a brown paper bag in which to carry it. Of course, as with the Café de Flore, that's not original either: in Blow Up it was a paper bag but with a Nikon F...

Conclusion 2. Photography is best enjoyed in the thinking about it.

Ain't nothin' simple but me?

Rob C
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #69 on: August 30, 2010, 09:57:14 AM »
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Well, if that last paragraph doesn't move it, then nothing will!

In truth, if you don't make something happen, then nothing will make something happen for you. All the talent, experience, and perspective in the world are useless without the will to put it all together and do something constructive.




I have to admit, I instantly recognize the difficulties in everything; until now I'd seen that as a sort of self-preservation mechanism... maybe I was mistaken.

I can see the focus on the difficulties in your writings ... perhaps it is now best to begin focusing on the possibilities ...

The paradox is (and all truth contains paradox), 'recognizing' difficulties can be critical, yet it is only useful insofar as said recognition enables you to prepare for difficulties, to go around them, or to bridge them in some way. Being consumed by difficulties, however, is something totally different. The focus should always be on the passion, not the problems. Focusing more on the difficulties than the mission only creates paralysis, not production.

As the saying goes, "Never sum-up all the obstacles; instead always keep your eye directly on the goal."




Thanks for your time and views.
Rob C

No problem.

I was just thinking, perhaps the best way to spark a drive within yourself is marry your proclivity for writing with the passion you clearly have for what you used to do, by creating some sort of book (bio or even a novel) about fashion photography. Not only would you keep alive all the fond memories that you so obviously have, but you could provide more to them with the kind of insightful commentary that only the hindsight of time, perspective, and a wistful appreciation can bring ...

Something to think about anyway ...

Cheers,

Jack





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Rob C
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« Reply #70 on: September 01, 2010, 11:29:07 AM »
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Well, Jack, between you and Keith, I have been pushed into creating a new gallery within my website. There's zilch in it yet, so don't bother looking, but the intent is established.

I now have to do something - if I remember how to do it, or even what it is supposed to be that I'm going to be doing...

Ciao -

Rob C
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« Reply #71 on: September 07, 2010, 04:37:05 PM »
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The obvious answer to Why? is surely, Why not?

The role of photography has changed considerably over the past few years and can no longer be so easily classified according to the old trinity of pro, enthusiast and occasional snapper. The use of cameras has mushroomed as they have become cheaper and the inconvenience of development has been eradicated. They are an accessory to the young having fun, an extension to the PC for those who like techie things and a method of expressing an innate creativity to those who seek a painless outlet for the artist within. It could be argued that photography was always about these but digitalisation has empowered us all in the ability to produce instant images without the disagreeable process of study or contemplation, and boy does it show at times.

Look at the photo magazines and the relentless message is 'we are all as good as pro's now, just so long as we all buy the latest whizz bang wallop box.' The distressing thing is though that in many scenario's there is an element of truth in that. The photo's I have seen of the Munster 100 Road Race taken by fully kitted out media pass types were no better than I have seen on a couple of forums. But where the going gets tough such as tricky light or studio work then there is still room for a person with some knowledge of the craft, it's just that consumers and customers of photography no longer appreciate this.

So why should anyone take a photo if they are not being paid for it? For the sheer pleasure of doing so. We cannot deny people this experience and nor can we insist that they must demonstrate a certain standard before being allowed to roam with a camera. A more pertinent question is how do those who have made money from it continue to do so in these new circumstances, a worrying question as I note the increasing numbers of closed high street studios and brides with an uncle who's got a 'good' camera and so on. Whether is able to use it to any great effect is a question rarely addressed.
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Rob C
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« Reply #72 on: September 10, 2010, 08:15:35 AM »
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It's a funny thing, but even though I always believed that my own philosophy in both professional and 'personal' work - I hate that term; it sounds so bloody pretentious to me - was pretty well one and the same, this has been brought home to me ever so much more strongly over the past couple of days. The catalyst has been the creation of my third gallery in the website (gallery not up yet, so don't bother) where the original intention had been to post a collection of stuff that wasn't really connected in any manner or means with my working life. To my surprise, I discovered that I was actually selecting pics which were either from model tests, more old calendars or even just material from that golden era when I had the unappreciated luxury of a personal muse, a wonderful girl who was every bit as interested in Vogue, Harper's, Nova et al as was I. And my wife didn't have a worry in her head. You can't buy that.

Anyway, what I discovered was that pretty well everything I do/have done falls into much the same mould, be it women, objects or landscapes. For some reason, I have shied away from city shots; perhaps I needed to study karate. Or flower arranging.

This may or may not be obvious to anyone else, but to me, it screams out identity, however much I would have liked to broaded the definition of that - as applied to my own oeuvre; seems to me I do the same basic shot all the time. Is that all there is, for any of us?

Rob C

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« Reply #73 on: September 15, 2010, 02:16:55 PM »
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I can see beauty, some magic, in the corner of my street, in every single step, no doubt. But it does not specially means that I want to catch it with a camera.
I read some lines here about beauty, well, beauty is just one possibility. Motivation for some can be the harsh and the ugly (many Magnum photographers) that become esthetic in the right hands.
I point esthetic and not beautifull.
Others will find motivation in war images, sports action, catastrophies reportages etc...You can meet esthetism in war, but I can't call that seeking for beauty.

In my daily experience, I just know two types of photographers. The one who shoot constantly whatever are the reasons and conditions. And the ones who shoot only on assignments.

But don't get me wrong; it does not mean that the photographers who shoot only on assignment (this can also be an auto-assignment) are just commercial and not artists...that would be a big mistake to beleive so.

Many posters here had the feeling that Rob has a sort of general negativity because his lack of motivation. I see more an healphy feeling of an experienced being who does not want to fool himself with false motivations. It is not negativity IMO, it is an authentic tragedia (in the noble way).

We all make one single image. What we do is only infinite variations of the same story. That is what we are made of, that has something to do with our real nature, perception and sensitivity.

Rob is obviously not a street or landscape shooter.
But the point made by John, that there are models for free does not work either because Rob also shoot on assignment, for a precise purpose. At least that is what I feel and that is why I think that motivation (lack of) in this case has a profund meaning and has to be respected.

When the studio lights are down and the people gone and you are in the middle of this silence...who has ever experienced that feeling?

And when the studio lights are gone forever because there is no more client, do you really think that taking the Nikon for a walk or invent a fake fashion work with amateur girls will bring back motivation?

IMO, the really good thing someone in Rob's position could do is finding motivation in spreading the archives, all the imagery of a full and well lived pro life. I think that the clew might be somewhere here.

All IMO.
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Rob C
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« Reply #74 on: September 15, 2010, 03:51:52 PM »
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I can see beauty, some magic, in the corner of my street, in every single step, no doubt. But it does not specially means that I want to catch it with a camera.
I read some lines here about beauty, well, beauty is just one possibility. Motivation for some can be the harsh and the ugly (many Magnum photographers) that become esthetic in the right hands.
I point esthetic and not beautifull.
Others will find motivation in war images, sports action, catastrophies reportages etc...You can meet esthetism in war, but I can't call that seeking for beauty.

In my daily experience, I just know two types of photographers. The one who shoot constantly whatever are the reasons and conditions. And the ones who shoot only on assignments.

But don't get me wrong; it does not mean that the photographers who shoot only on assignment (this can also be an auto-assignment) are just commercial and not artists...that would be a big mistake to beleive so.

Many posters here had the feeling that Rob has a sort of general negativity because his lack of motivation. I see more an healphy feeling of an experienced being who does not want to fool himself with false motivations. It is not negativity IMO, it is an authentic tragedia (in the noble way).

We all make one single image. What we do is only infinite variations of the same story. That is what we are made of, that has something to do with our real nature, perception and sensitivity.

Rob is obviously not a street or landscape shooter.
But the point made by John, that there are models for free does not work either because Rob also shoot on assignment, for a precise purpose. At least that is what I feel and that is why I think that motivation (lack of) in this case has a profund meaning and has to be respected.

When the studio lights are down and the people gone and you are in the middle of this silence...who has ever experienced that feeling?

And when the studio lights are gone forever because there is no more client, do you really think that taking the Nikon for a walk or invent a fake fashion work with amateur girls will bring back motivation?

IMO, the really good thing someone in Rob's position could do is finding motivation in spreading the archives, all the imagery of a full and well lived pro life. I think that the clew might be somewhere here.

All IMO.



Caramba! Wish I’d said that.

Well, hoping not to hog the limelight, I have just some minutes ago put some more stuff up in the Biscuit Tin part of the website, some of which is old and some of which comes from my walk around Pollensa town and, then, the port, two Sundays ago.

I don’t find it fits any strict sense of ‘street’ at all, but I guess it’s still personal observation, whether of things, places or, perish the thought, people who don’t know me. The trouble is, there is just such a lot of choice in life, whether in what you do, whom you befriend and vice versa; even more confusing or, perhaps, complicating, is the sense that what instantly says something to me because of what may have been experienced years and years ago will probably strike nothing, not a chord nor even a sour note with anyone else.

Does that mean that when we go out there, doing something without a commission, that we must shoot something that others will recognize, will instantly see as symbolic of a commonly shared sensation? Is there room for the individual eye, for the inner vision that cannot be shared? Does that render it redundant? Are all of the great masters’ iconic pictures iconic just because they fit a standard conception of something?

The artist who is before his time – is he really, or is it perhaps that his time arrives because somebody, somewhere, decides that he’s fresh meat? Exploitable? Collectible?

I was going to watch a movie on tv tonight…

Ciao

Rob C
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