Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Dry Ice, Fog Machine, Smoke Machine, ....  (Read 5257 times)
RomainVaucher
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24


« on: August 06, 2010, 03:05:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Hey everyone,

Has anyone of you ever worked with machine/things that produce fog.

I need for a fashion shoot that I have coming soon, a machine that produce a thick fog that goes up, and one with fog that stays more down.

What are your advices for that ?

Anything I should look for ? Anything I should pay attention to ?

Thanks,

R.
Logged
RomainVaucher
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24


« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2010, 12:15:13 PM »
ReplyReply

nobody ?
Logged
Steve Weldon
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1447



WWW
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2010, 12:49:21 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: RomainVaucher
Hey everyone,

Has anyone of you ever worked with machine/things that produce fog.

I need for a fashion shoot that I have coming soon, a machine that produce a thick fog that goes up, and one with fog that stays more down.

What are your advices for that ?

Anything I should look for ? Anything I should pay attention to ?

Thanks,

R.
They're pretty simple devices.  I have one here but haven't used it in years.. One thing I'd think about is availability of the fluid.  How easy it is to ship (regulations have changed since 9/11), cost, etc.  I think you can even mix your own with certain machines but I don't know the recipe.  Anyone?
Logged

----------------------------------------------
http://www.BangkokImages.com
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2010, 02:21:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Steve Weldon
They're pretty simple devices.  I have one here but haven't used it in years.. One thing I'd think about is availability of the fluid.  How easy it is to ship (regulations have changed since 9/11), cost, etc.  I think you can even mix your own with certain machines but I don't know the recipe.  Anyone?


I had the opportunity of using an even more simple one back in the late 60s or early 70s. It was a smoke bomb as sold by theatrical hire shops. It was brown, the smoke white.

The job was to shoot a pic of a large Christmas Tree in Central Station, Glasgow. The tree was festooned with empty present boxes with lots of tinsel etc. with a guy modelling in front of it. Obviuosly, very imaginative. As I recall, nobody thought to ask permission to use the smoke. Anyway, I did use it, and as far as I know, I was able to extinguish it somehow after I'd finished. Today, I'd have been imprisoned or shot. I guess it shows how laid back we were able to be, once-upon-a-time. But you couldn't control the smoke - it went with the draughts and there were plenty of those in that city.

It never occurred to me that it might explode. All in all, I wouldn't recommend those devices.

Rob C
Logged

WillHastings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2010, 02:37:33 PM »
ReplyReply

There are essentially three types of fog machines. the first is commonly referred to as "rosco" fog and is white cloud like smoke generated that eventually disperses into a haze. this is generated buy a machine that superheats a special fluid, usually glycol based, and shoots out a nozzle.

the second is what is known as a Hazer, this works essentially the same way but it comes out as a haze to begin with. these are normally used in rock and roll so you can see the beams of the moving lights.

the third is a dry ice fogger, which uses water and dry Ice to produce a low lying ground cover type fog. There are also chiller units that will cool Rosco fog in an attempt to make it stick to the ground but in my experience (which is mostly theatrical) they don't work very well.  The colder it is in the room the more the fog will stay low.

All three of these can be easily rented from any theatrical supply house. Cheap versions of the the basic fog machines can be purchased from most Haloween costume places or online stores. The fluid can also be purchased online.

I have also heard folks talk about using smokers and smoke candles that are used for finding leaks in AC systems. these can be purchased from places like Grangier and McMaster Carr. but I have no idea how well they work for photography - they strike me as difficult to controll.

For a thick fog that stays up I would thing you would want something like This and you will need to fire a a controlled burst every few shots

I did a shoot for a band recently where I used a Reelfx DF-50 hazer, which is the workhorse standard in the concert world. We were shooting in a smalish rehearsal space and it didn't take much to fill the space. So you might be able to really let it go for a while and get the look you are going for. The other nice thing about the DF-50 is that it does not leave any residue on your gear. (or anything else). Some of the older oil based hazers and some of the DIY solutions leave a horrible film on everything.

Here is a sample shot haven't quite figured out how to post images here yet.

No matter what system you use the key to getting fog to look right is temperature and air flow.  You want the air in the room as still as possible (get some fans to clear it when necessary) and warm for high level fog and cool for low level fog.  And don't forget about smoke alarms. You may need to disable them.

Hope this helps.






Logged
WillHastings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2010, 02:44:13 PM »
ReplyReply

BTW. Production Resource Group PRG has offices in both Berlin and Paris, they should be able to rent you anything you need.
Logged
Steve Weldon
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1447



WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2010, 02:47:19 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote from: Rob C
I had the opportunity of using an even more simple one back in the late 60s or early 70s. It was a smoke bomb as sold by theatrical hire shops. It was brown, the smoke white.

The job was to shoot a pic of a large Christmas Tree in Central Station, Glasgow. The tree was festooned with empty present boxes with lots of tinsel etc. with a guy modelling in front of it. Obviuosly, very imaginative. As I recall, nobody thought to ask permission to use the smoke. Anyway, I did use it, and as far as I know, I was able to extinguish it somehow after I'd finished. Today, I'd have been imprisoned or shot. I guess it shows how laid back we were able to be, once-upon-a-time. But you couldn't control the smoke - it went with the draughts and there were plenty of those in that city.

It never occurred to me that it might explode. All in all, I wouldn't recommend those devices.

Rob C
The one I have isn't heating anything up.. at least not on any great level as it stays cool to the touch.  I think the solution is a bit like soapy water and there is a small 'warming up' period before smoke comes out.. and a great deal of it too.  I'd guess there's a small heating element turning something in the solution to smoke.  Harmless cool to the touch smoke.

But really.. smoke around a model or product is dated at best.  You don't see that big a call for it anymore.

Ok.. I just looked.. and I've been very bad.  It appears "smoke" is a bad word and not to be used.   It connotes visions of either blackened lungs or raging forest fires where even the mere whisper of the word "smoke" earns you a ticket from the PC Police.  From henceforth we will call these "FOG' machines like the OP intended..

I have the Roscoe model here.  Its a lot more expensive than I remember.  What would have ever possessed me to spend nearly $400 to make FOG?  A moment of craziness or a high paying customer I'm sure..

Search engines are great.. I Yahoo'd "Roscoe fog machine solution recipes" and came up with this.

I think I'll run out tomorrow and make some..  I live in a 32 story high-rise.. lots of smoke.. errr.. I mean fog.. imagine the possibilities..
Logged

----------------------------------------------
http://www.BangkokImages.com
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad