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Author Topic: some very nice landscape/seascape work  (Read 3647 times)
dwood
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« on: August 13, 2010, 11:09:27 AM »
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I recently stumbled upon the work of a guy by the name of Saurabh Deoras. He's a disk drive research engineer by day, photographer after hours. I think some of you might enjoy looking at his images.

http://sdeoras.smugmug.com/Portfolio
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2010, 03:09:28 PM »
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Some excellent work there - thanks for sharing them!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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RSL
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« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2010, 03:33:46 PM »
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Do you suppose he could be pushing the color saturation a bit???
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2010, 04:08:16 PM »
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Color saturation, and the sharpening, too.

This is a style of photography that seems to be very popular these days, highly saturated and highly sharpened, but to me it just smacks of turning up the stereo's volume to make it sound "better" than the otherwise equally-good or better stereo next to it.  The photos look to me like generic good (but not great) photos that have had the "volume" increased a great deal.

Lisa
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RSL
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« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2010, 05:08:20 PM »
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Thanks, Lisa. I was so blinded by the color that I missed the sharpening.
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David Sutton
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« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2010, 05:37:07 PM »
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Color saturation, and the sharpening, too.

This is a style of photography that seems to be very popular these days, highly saturated and highly sharpened, but to me it just smacks of turning up the stereo's volume to make it sound "better" than the otherwise equally-good or better stereo next to it.  The photos look to me like generic good (but not great) photos that have had the "volume" increased a great deal.

Lisa


That seems  a good description. Is it just me, or are they also sharpened throughout the image? That was one of the first things I got picked up on with sharpening, having to answer the question "does it look realistic?"
David
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Haraldo
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« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2010, 11:41:44 AM »
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Some nice work here. Agree with most of your observations, but being a "beachaholic" myself, I found his beach work the best. He has a good feel for the beach and the sea. For example I like his "Crashing Waves" and "Ocean Fury" that make good use of long-exposure-blur. I get a real "be-there" feeling. Not sure what he does with these images; there's no mention of selling or buying. Just a hobby?
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Haraldo
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2010, 04:13:49 AM »
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However he does it, a nice eye and also some zooms that really do seem to have worked well. Wish my own 24-70mm Nik G had been as good - might still have had it today. Damn those companies that don't do thorough final inspection before delivery - I always knew it was a self-defeating concept. Put me off zooms for ever. He also is able to use small apertures without realistic signs of trouble. Perhaps that 100% does as much harm as good?

What does come to mind with this kind of photography is that you probably have to be pretty fit to be able to get to where the views are. Our own UK photographers that star in this firmament are generally climbers, too.

Whatever, I have looked at all of the site, so he must be doing something right.

Rob C
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sbunting108
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« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2010, 03:46:17 PM »
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I really like some of the photographs particularly the waterfall one however yes I also agree that the saturation has been pushed too far!
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John R
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« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2010, 11:03:55 PM »
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I don't know whether any of the photos are "over" sharpened. But they do look tack sharp, which I assume is a function of a better and larger sensor and perhaps some sharpening. However, I don't see any obvious signs of oversharpening that I often see on many sites with amateurs. From what I see, many images have the distinct look of polarization. No matter how we feel about the technical quality of the images, the aesthetic component is unquestionably very good.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2010, 09:01:42 AM »
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I don't know whether any of the photos are "over" sharpened. But they do look tack sharp, which I assume is a function of a better and larger sensor and perhaps some sharpening. However, I don't see any obvious signs of oversharpening that I often see on many sites with amateurs. From what I see, many images have the distinct look of polarization. No matter how we feel about the technical quality of the images, the aesthetic component is unquestionably very good.
That is exactly my take on them.

Eric
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Justan
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« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2010, 09:28:55 AM »
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I recently stumbled upon the work of a guy by the name of Saurabh Deoras. He's a disk drive research engineer by day, photographer after hours. I think some of you might enjoy looking at his images.

http://sdeoras.smugmug.com/Portfolio



The author has a wonderful sense of composition, color, lighting and, well, everything. Many of the works are done at the golden hour yet none suffer in the slightest from losing any detail or nuance to shadow. His city panos are among his best works.

One thing that stood out clearly across the works is that capturing pre-sun up and post sun-down times can be done extremely well without a predominance of dark spaces. The eye will readily accept the suggestion of greatly reduced lighting without the image struggling to free itself from formless darkened settings. This work makes me re-think some of my own shots in similar lighting, and i like what i've learned!

Not sure where the over-colored or over-sharpened comments come from, but of course some people’s sensitivities are a topic onto themselves that often have little to do with the work under review ………

Thanks for the link. Please post more from your wanderings!
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RSL
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« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2010, 10:04:38 AM »
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No matter how we feel about the technical quality of the images, the aesthetic component is unquestionably very good.

John, I agree that the esthetic component of the pictures is excellent. But I don't think you can write off the technical component because you like the esthetics. With street photography you often can, but not with landscape.

Two observations, one of which is a parable:

(1) I have a friend who exhibits and sells photographs at art fairs. In fact, he's downtown in an art fair today. A couple years ago I stopped by his exhibit and, after walking around and examining his work, which, from the standpoint of esthetics was quite good, I said, "You've pushed the color saturation a lot since last time I saw this stuff." He replied, "Yes, and my sales have doubled."

(2) A friend was watching a cabinet maker finish the inside of a drawer slot, a spot that would be covered up once the cabinet was completed. The friend said, "Why do you go to the trouble of finishing that slot? Who will know?" The cabinet maker raised his head, looked at his friend and said, "I will know!"
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tps7c
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« Reply #13 on: September 17, 2010, 09:41:55 AM »
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I've noticed a bit on this site, that there's a group of people who are really against any manipulation of a photo that makes it look slightly (or vastly) unrealistic.  Too much saturation, overly sharp, etc.  I've definitely seen some some overuse of those adjustments, but in the case of the photos mentioned in this thread, I just don't see it.  What I'm really wondering though, is why do you care if it's not totally realistic?!?!  If I want realistic, I'll look out my back window.  What I want to see, from a photographic artist as opposed to a photographer, is a sense of how that time and place made them FEEL.  I just don't get this faction of realists who talk about manipulation of an image as if it's a sin.  If you simply prefer a less saturated or sharp look, that's one thing.  But to say that an outstanding image is less than 'holy' because of some manipulation seems odd to me.
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MichaelWorley
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« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2010, 05:12:05 PM »
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My goodness! Beautiful work. We were just at Soberanes Point. We must have been there at the same time. What does this guy look like?

Mike
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Colorwave
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« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2010, 08:37:04 PM »
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Add me to the "nice, but spoiled by extreme oversaturation' camp.  Some of them are certainly oversharpened, but three quarters of them are just way too intense, colorwise.  I know that the wow factor is tempting, but a few of them actually make my eyes hurt because of the intense color combinations.  I'd love to see these with more naturalistic colors, which I'm sure are still quite stunning.
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