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Author Topic: 'Softproofing' preview vs. 'convert to profile' preview  (Read 1224 times)
AndyWatson
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« on: August 18, 2010, 02:25:48 AM »
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Using a Mac and Photoshop I have been following Michael's advice re using the paper profiles and the preview checker in custom proof/softproofing to preview before modifying the image to before printing.
My next stage is to edit/convert to the paper profile and save as a printing only file to send to my Epson. There is also a preview checker as you convert to profile and a choice of rendering intent.
My question is does this duplicate the preview in 'softproofing' and if so then am I in effect seeing a kind of softproof at the conversions stage ?   Thanks for any light on this.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2010, 08:33:56 AM »
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My question is does this duplicate the preview in 'softproofing' and if so then am I in effect seeing a kind of softproof at the conversions stage ?

Its the same soft proof when set identically. Difference is, after you click OK in Convert to Profile, you’ve converted all the numbers. With a proof setup, you’re still in the original RGB working space just viewing the simulation.
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Andrew Rodney
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francois
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« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2010, 09:51:49 AM »
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Converting your files is not the most flexible way to do it. What will happen if you change your printer or if your favorite paper is not available anymore? Using soft-printing allows you to target multiple printers and multiple papers.
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Francois
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« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2010, 10:19:35 AM »
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You don't want to convert the image to the paper profile before sending to the printer. 

Use the soft proof to make adjustments to the image to bring back any colour saturation, loss of contrast or other effects then send the file with its original colour profile (e.g., AdobeRGB, sRGB) to the printer and use the paper profile in the print setup, being sure to select Photoshop Manages Colors and turning Printer Color Management off.

To make it easier to adjust the proofed image, before proofing, duplicate the image.  Apply the proof condition to the original.  Now you've got a proofed version and an unproofed version side by side and you can make adjustments to the proofed version till they look the same again (or as close as you can get).

As Andrew says, the soft proof setup has the same effect as a profile conversion but without actually changing anything in the image file.
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AndyWatson
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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2010, 01:48:28 PM »
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Many thanks all for your comments.
I think I started converting as well as softproofing at a time when I was sending some of the images to a 'lightjet' lab for 'C' type prints and they ask for a profile converted file for their workflow but it's reassuring to know that as I suspected I have been doubling up on the process when sending to my home Epson.

Francois - good point though I would always rename the converted 'printing file' and go back to the master file for any future use.  A lot of files around though !

Bob - Yes I find it really useful to do side by side comparison with a duplicate while softproofing. Possibly I have been causing errors then by sending a 'converted to paper profile'  image to the printer AND using the paper profile in the print setup  (selecting Photoshop Manages Colors and turning Printer Color Management off) ?  If not errors then certainly extra work.
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