Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: The Seaside  (Read 2402 times)
Ed Blagden
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 491



WWW
« on: August 19, 2010, 03:23:05 PM »
ReplyReply

I rather like this one... anyone else?

Ed
Logged

Visit my Flickr page
RSL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6396



WWW
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2010, 04:21:14 PM »
ReplyReply

Ed, It's colorful, and I like the tilt of the umbrella, but I miss the point. Don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I'd love to see a lot more pictures of this genre on here, and I hope you'll keep shooting this kind of thing instead of the endlessly boring rocks and stones and trees we see far too much of.
Logged

degrub
Guest
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2010, 09:25:21 PM »
ReplyReply

i like the picture as well. Is it part of a series that tells something about the people in the chairs ? i want to know something about them, but i'm not seeing in just the single shot.

Frank
Logged
John R Smith
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1357


Still crazy, after all these years


« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2010, 03:32:28 AM »
ReplyReply

Ed

This one to me is a "nearly". The composition is excellent except for just one detail, which we will get to in a minute. But first the good points - you have an excellent eye for colour work, which I completely lack, and this picture is working well off the ochre/grey/cream texture of the pebbles, against which are set the red and green stripes of the twio deckchairs. In B/W the whole point would be lost. So all of this is really good.

Where in my opinion it fails is exactly where I myself make the same mistake time and time again. The figures in the immediate background are just as important to the composition as any other part of the frame. And here you needed to wait until the group immediately behind the couple in the chairs had separated themselves out a little bit further. As it is, the figures are getting cropped by the rim of the umbrella.

Often I miss this sort of thing because I don't check the whole of the picture in the viewfinder carefully enough before I hit the shutter.

John
Logged

Hasselblad 500 C/M, SWC and CFV-39 DB
and a case full of (very old) lenses and other bits
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2010, 05:07:28 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm amazed. You all miss the point which is a reflection of the same one, made time after time by, by a certain English Magnum star. What it's about, is it's about the desperation of the people who find themselves in the picture. You are observing the horror that for some is actually pleasure! Just imagine their everyday lives.

Think about it: the weather, obviously, sucks, and they need an umbrella not necessarily for the sunshine but probably for the likely drizzle and cold wind; the area to the right of the chairs is the beach pizza (cousin to the pavement pizza) left by a group of revelers the night before, not sand. I could go on with the symbolism, but suffice to say that, like fashion or redneck politics, you get it or you don't.

I get it but wish that I didn't. Because, if I didn't, then it wouldn't exist for those people either. Definitely time for genetic engineering.

;-)

Rob C
Logged

John R Smith
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1357


Still crazy, after all these years


« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2010, 05:29:55 AM »
ReplyReply

I'm amazed. You all miss the point which is a reflection of the same one, made time after time by, by a certain English Magnum star. What it's about, is it's about the desperation of the people who find themselves in the picture. You are observing the horror that for some is actually pleasure! Just imagine their everyday lives.

Does all that mean that you like the picture, or not, Rob?

I like the picture myself, rather a lot, despite my little niggle over the one very small aspect. It is the sort of very gentle shot which actually says a great deal about the English and their ritualistic fondness for the seaside holiday, whatever the odds. It also says something rather touching about old age, again with an English slant. I don't think these people, or the picture, are something to be reviled or sneered at.

I think Russ probably misses the point simply because he hails from NYC. Anyone like me, who as a child went on family holidays to Scarborough, Kinghorn and Whitby knows exactly what this is all about.

John
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 08:11:45 AM by John R Smith » Logged

Hasselblad 500 C/M, SWC and CFV-39 DB
and a case full of (very old) lenses and other bits
Patricia Sheley
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 578


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2010, 08:30:31 AM »
ReplyReply

Can't find the picture being discussed...what am I missing to access? thanks

AH HAH!!! wasn't logged in...cancel request... Embarrassed
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 08:32:25 AM by psheleyimages » Logged

A common woman...

www.patriciasheley.com
Haraldo
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 102



WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2010, 10:22:21 AM »
ReplyReply

Here's my take...

As a beachaholic (just like Martin Parr about whom I suspect Rob C is talking), the picture doesn't tell me enough. There's something "flat" about it (besides not having much contrast). Where's "the story" here?

Let me back up to Martin Parr some more. He is a self-proclaimed 'aficianado of the British seaside'. And he's been shooting people -- common people -- at the beach since 1985. He's done whole projects (exhibitions, books, etc.) on the subject, some of which have made him very famous. But what I get from Parr is his celebration of the weirdness -- sometimes grotesqueness -- of modern life, but very artfully captured, in my view. His pictures of the beach sizzle with energy.

This picture, while nicely composed with the couple in the right 1/3 spot, just doesn't connect with me. Maybe if I could see the couple more to discern what they're about. Maybe if the background was not as busy. Maybe if the picture had more punch, color/contrast-wise. I don't know. It's not a bad picture. But it's not quite there for me.

Here's a relavant quote from Parr about all this:
"The seaside has to be one of the most fascinating places for people-watching," he says. "It is a place where we relax and lose our inhibitions, and that's when true personalities come on display." The fact that revellers of all shapes and sizes are physically exposed, in various states of undress, means that they enjoy a shared sense of community as they meet people who they wouldn't otherwise encounter in their everyday life – "that in itself is revitalising," says Parr. The photographer views the beach as a microcosm of society which allows us to observe the habits and tendencies belonging to particular cultures. ...
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 10:35:27 AM by Haraldo » Logged

Haraldo
aka Harald Johnson
Phoozl - photo games & more
Ed Blagden
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 491



WWW
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2010, 03:22:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Some really fascinating comments here, so thanks to all for the feedback.

Ed, It's colorful, and I like the tilt of the umbrella, but I miss the point. Don't misunderstand what I'm saying. I'd love to see a lot more pictures of this genre on here, and I hope you'll keep shooting this kind of thing instead of the endlessly boring rocks and stones and trees we see far too much of.

It's interesting that the English respondents seemed to immediately "get" what the image was about (even if they didn't like it) and the US ones didn't get it at all.  Obviously, some things don't travel well.  Incidentally Russ, are you implying that my particular rocks 'n trees pictures are boring, in a class-leading kind of way, or are you speaking more generally about the genre?

Ed

This one to me is a "nearly". The composition is excellent except for just one detail, which we will get to in a minute. But first the good points - you have an excellent eye for colour work, which I completely lack, and this picture is working well off the ochre/grey/cream texture of the pebbles, against which are set the red and green stripes of the twio deckchairs. In B/W the whole point would be lost. So all of this is really good.

Where in my opinion it fails is exactly where I myself make the same mistake time and time again. The figures in the immediate background are just as important to the composition as any other part of the frame. And here you needed to wait until the group immediately behind the couple in the chairs had separated themselves out a little bit further. As it is, the figures are getting cropped by the rim of the umbrella.

Often I miss this sort of thing because I don't check the whole of the picture in the viewfinder carefully enough before I hit the shutter.

John

Thanks John, that is really helpful.  When I looked at the image for the first time I thought that the figures in the background were a bit Lowry-esque, and I agree that the umbrella does rather b*gger things up.  I should have stood a bit higher.



I'm amazed. You all miss the point which is a reflection of the same one, made time after time by, by a certain English Magnum star. What it's about, is it's about the desperation of the people who find themselves in the picture. You are observing the horror that for some is actually pleasure! Just imagine their everyday lives.

Think about it: the weather, obviously, sucks, and they need an umbrella not necessarily for the sunshine but probably for the likely drizzle and cold wind; the area to the right of the chairs is the beach pizza (cousin to the pavement pizza) left by a group of revelers the night before, not sand. I could go on with the symbolism, but suffice to say that, like fashion or redneck politics, you get it or you don't.

I get it but wish that I didn't. Because, if I didn't, then it wouldn't exist for those people either. Definitely time for genetic engineering.

;-)

Rob C

Does all that mean that you like the picture, or not, Rob?

I like the picture myself, rather a lot, despite my little niggle over the one very small aspect. It is the sort of very gentle shot which actually says a great deal about the English and their ritualistic fondness for the seaside holiday, whatever the odds. It also says something rather touching about old age, again with an English slant. I don't think these people, or the picture, are something to be reviled or sneered at.

I think Russ probably misses the point simply because he hails from NYC. Anyone like me, who as a child went on family holidays to Scarborough, Kinghorn and Whitby knows exactly what this is all about.

John

These two reactions are fascinating.  Rob and John, you both "get" the picture, but have completely different reactions to it.  For what it's worth, the picture was intended to be affectionate, two old souls in perfect peace, grimly enjoying themselves despite the drizzle and the beach pizza.  But Rob's comments are "valid" (ghastly word), save for the bit about genetic engineering.

Here's my take...

As a beachaholic (just like Martin Parr about whom I suspect Rob C is talking), the picture doesn't tell me enough. There's something "flat" about it (besides not having much contrast). Where's "the story" here?

Let me back up to Martin Parr some more. He is a self-proclaimed 'aficianado of the British seaside'. And he's been shooting people -- common people -- at the beach since 1985. He's done whole projects (exhibitions, books, etc.) on the subject, some of which have made him very famous. But what I get from Parr is his celebration of the weirdness -- sometimes grotesqueness -- of modern life, but very artfully captured, in my view. His pictures of the beach sizzle with energy.

This picture, while nicely composed with the couple in the right 1/3 spot, just doesn't connect with me. Maybe if I could see the couple more to discern what they're about. Maybe if the background was not as busy. Maybe if the picture had more punch, color/contrast-wise. I don't know. It's not a bad picture. But it's not quite there for me.



I admit, I was certainly thinking about Parr when I made this picture, but not trying to imitate the great man.  The intention here was to be more muted, more restrained, and the lack of punch is probably something to do with the drizzle.
Logged

Visit my Flickr page
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2010, 04:17:43 PM »
ReplyReply

"These two reactions are fascinating.  Rob and John, you both "get" the picture, but have completely different reactions to it.  For what it's worth, the picture was intended to be affectionate, two old souls in perfect peace, grimly enjoying themselves despite the drizzle and the beach pizza.  But Rob's comments are "valid" (ghastly word), save for the bit about genetic engineering."

I'm trying the cut'n'paste route to being able to write without losing myself below the horizon of the "quote" box.

Actually, Parr was the guy I had in mind, but his use of flash and hyped colour turns me right off, as does his choice of this subject matter, which for me makes him a star in the exploitation world of snappers, where, unlike the paparazzi, he effs the general public instead. Also unlike the work of the paps, the subjects get no payback from the exposure.

.
 Oops - I've hit the disappearing writing bit again! Well, cut'n'paste doesn't do it either.

Time to quit before the migraine

Rob C

Logged

Haraldo
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 102



WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2010, 04:54:09 PM »
ReplyReply

I for one like what Parr is doing. It's brash and IN YOUR FACE (well, not YOUR face). Even the Magnum page on him says: "... numerous photographic projects flaunt his provocative photographic style, one humorously defined by the moral atrophy and preposterousness of modern times..."

I don't see him exploiting but just doing social commentary. He envisions a project and then goes after it in a big way. I like that. I also like his use of flash and punchy colors. I like the quiet and subdued, too, but when it comes to people on the beach just pop the ring light right in their faces! It's aggressive but more interesting for the viewer. And for the subjects, what would you like him to do: take names and send them a few quid?

BTW, did you know that he only made it into Magnum by 1 vote? The Old Guard were all aghast at what he was (and is) doing. And now he's a Super Star for them. Goes to show that you never know.
« Last Edit: August 20, 2010, 06:50:52 PM by Haraldo » Logged

Haraldo
aka Harald Johnson
Phoozl - photo games & more
RSL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6396



WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2010, 06:04:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Russ, are you implying that my particular rocks 'n trees pictures are boring, in a class-leading kind of way, or are you speaking more generally about the genre?

Ed, As I've said many times, I think people are always more interesting than rocks and stones and trees. Wordsworth did too, especially when it came to Lucy.
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2010, 09:04:48 AM »
ReplyReply

 "And for the subjects, what would you like him to do: take names and send them a few quid?"

That would be nice, but perhaps even more so would be to leave them in peace. Sorry I misunderstood it for exploitation.

"BTW, did you know that he only made it into Magnum by 1 vote? The Old Guard were all aghast at what he was (and is) doing. And now he's a Super Star for them. Goes to show that you never know."

That shows the flaw associated with majority voting systems: the lowest common denominator always wins. Worse, there comes a time when nobody worth sixpence even wants to stand for office or stay in the club.

Rob C



 
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2010, 09:31:20 AM »
ReplyReply

Russ, you've just restated my basic personal problem with doing landscape. As much as I would like to do it if for no other reason than it's there, generally free and would occupy my mind, when I get there...

Looking at my tiny library of photography-related books I do find several devoted to landscape, from French villages to English landscapes, and I see the purchase of each and every one of them as an attempted break away from what I used to do to earn the family crust, not that there was anything wrong with what I did other than that it came to an end.

Sitting in the shade on the terrace after lunch - a sort of risotto with peas, sultanas and a touch of curry powder, mustard, thyme and marjoram, sweet pepper, virgin olive oil, tomato frito and the single permitted glass of Rioja, swilled down afterwards with a glass of agua con gas from the mountains, I finished the French Village book with Charlie Waite's photographs that I had begun prior to the culinary chores, the latter section of the book accompanied by too much black coffee with a soupçon of cognac to help with the water.

I remember well buying it in Waterstone's bookshop in Glasgow, my refuge when my wife wanted to go to Marks and Sparks and buy underwear for us for the next hundred years - ironically, as it turned out. As I went through it the first time, waiting for the days to roll past and ferry-time to happen, I imagined our return drive south through France would take in some of that stuff... somehow, reality always determined otherwise and we headed pretty well due south with few deviations or meanders along beckoning river banks. Now, in the current heatwave, I can only feel sorrow for Mr Waite in his efforts. Don't misunderstand - his shots are great, as ever, but it's the thought of all that travelling, going from pillar to post in order to fulfill the commitment, facing oh hell, I've run into the dreaded disappearing writing again...

Rob C
« Last Edit: August 22, 2010, 09:45:49 AM by Rob C » Logged

tokengirl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 360



« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2010, 09:47:00 PM »
ReplyReply

I like the subject matter, and the dreariness.  It is pretty much exactly how I imagine the British seaside.  What doesn't work for me is the semi-shallow depth of field.  I think what's going on around them is important enough to get it all in focus, but if you feel it's not, then a much shallower DOF and having your subjects fill more of the frame would have worked better for me.
Logged
Haraldo
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 102



WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2010, 10:50:53 PM »
ReplyReply

"BTW, did you know that he only made it into Magnum by 1 vote? The Old Guard were all aghast at what he was (and is) doing. And now he's a Super Star for them. Goes to show that you never know."
That shows the flaw associated with majority voting systems: the lowest common denominator always wins. Worse, there comes a time when nobody worth sixpence even wants to stand for office or stay in the club.

Well, that is one way to look at it. But this is bound to happen when you have varied group and newcomers and their new blood and crazy ideas are not appreciated by the old guard. If the voting system was "uninamous" nothing would ever change and Magnum would have disappeared a long time ago. And you have to admit, in the face of all the changes in photography, they're still around. Can you say the same for many or any other similar groups? I think they've done an amazing job just in staying alive (I'm humming the BeeGees tune as I type this)

Sorry for slight Magnum tangent here.
Logged

Haraldo
aka Harald Johnson
Phoozl - photo games & more
Dale Villeponteaux
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 191



« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2010, 01:30:06 PM »
ReplyReply

The first thing I thought of was an English beach with a French impressionistic background.  I like it.  One thing I'm curious about, however.  At about 30 degrees NE of the right chair top-Is that a child, a dog or a sea-bound flesh-colored alligator?  My eyes aren't what they were last Wednesday, and the resolution doesn't help.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 01:42:56 PM by DaleVilleponteaux » Logged

A modest man, with much to be modest about
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad