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Author Topic: ((( The Amazing Green Lynx )))  (Read 4377 times)
JohnKoerner
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« on: September 10, 2010, 08:08:14 PM »
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The Green Lynx is arguably one of the most successful hunters in Florida. By the end of the summer, virtually every flower top or branch-end sports its very own Green Lynx spider waiting to capture something to eat. What I find most remarkable, however, is that these arthropods seem to "know" where to grab another insect or spider. If they grab a non-threat (like a katydid) they'll grab it anywhere ... but if they grab a real threat to themselves (like a bee, wasp, or other spider that can envenomate them back) these fantastic animals seem to "know" their anatomy and specifically strike their target in an area where their victim is defenseless. In fact, every time I see one of these spiders grab a bee or a wasp (which stings from its tail), the Green Lynx makes sure to grab it behind the head to prevent a counter-envenomation. Yet every time the Green Lynx grabs another spider, they make sure to grab it from behind (or from the side) to avoid its poison-producing fangs. Please allow (and enjoy) these photos to illustrate what I mean ...



Green Lynx w/ flower bee
(victim specifically seized behind the head, to avoid sting)



Green Lynx w/ flower bee
(again, victim specifically seized behind the head, to avoid sting)



Green Lynx w/ katydid
(victim casually seized in mid-body, with no concern)



Green Lynx w/ huge bald-faced hornet
(victim specifically seized behind the head, to avoid sting)



Green Lynx w/ jumping spider
(victim specifically seized from the rear, to avoid front-fangs)



Green Lynx w/ its own kind
(victim specifically seized from the side, to avoid front-fangs)


Is this all a coincidence? I don't think so. Call it "instinct" or call it some kind of "street sense," call it what you will, but I think these spiders know what they're after and attack them accordingly. I notice this pattern of attack without exception ... though, I suppose, that is because the exceptions wind-up dead

Enjoy!

Jack




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« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 06:54:47 AM by John Koerner » Logged
wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2010, 12:18:24 AM »
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A nice series, Jack.  Tephritid flies might look like the jumping spiders that eat them by coincidence, but their behaviour when one shows up definitely isn't!  If grabbing prey in the right way means life or death, you figure it out pretty quickly!

Mike.
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Roger Calixto
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« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2010, 04:55:13 AM »
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Very cool story and your pics are excellent. That spider sure is creepy though! I mean, look at the barbs on the legs!! *shudders*
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nigelrudyard
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« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2010, 06:06:19 AM »
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John,

As ever, I'm in awe of your photography, but since I have a bit of a phobia about creepy-crawlies didn't dwell too long on the detail! Seriously, excellent images.

Nigel
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2010, 06:32:46 AM »
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Glad you guys enjoyed the photos & story Smiley

[Note: I made a mistake in the last photo and said the Green Lynx had another "jumping spider" when actually it had killed and eaten its own kind Shocked ]

Jack




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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2010, 10:24:26 AM »
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Apart from cannibalisations, what else predates on these spiders? Here in the UK, wasps can end up meals, but will also predate spiders to feed their grubs.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2010, 01:49:10 PM »
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Wonderful creepy pix and narrative, Jack!

Eric
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http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
JohnKoerner
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« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2010, 09:09:20 PM »
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Apart from cannibalisations, what else predates on these spiders? Here in the UK, wasps can end up meals, but will also predate spiders to feed their grubs.

Hey Bill, I would guess it would depend on the size of the spider ... but when they grow up about the only thing that predates them is each other (or, perhaps, praying mantids). Most of the wasps I see that kill spiders do so to either orb spiders or the ground-dwelling wolf spiders. Most orb spiders are blind and are easily found and dispatched by wasps when they hide by day in leaf folds. As a matter of fact, I have a separate work building where I always leave the door open as I am in-and-out all day working on projects, and mud daubers and other wasps build their nests on the siding of the interior (and I let them) ... and there are literally dozens of orb spiders that get placed on my work bench per week for "safe keeping" until the mud daubers collect them again and stuff them in their nests. Similarly, even though wolf spiders have excellent eyesight, they're ground-dwelling and fairly conspicuous, and I see other kinds of hunting wasps locate and dispatch wolf spiders regularly also.

By contrast, I have never seen any wasp dragging a Green Lynx about the yard. Not saying it can't happen, but I have yet to see it one time, while I have seen uncountable examples of the other kind of wasp prey on other spiders. I think this may be because the Green Lynx is so well-camoflaged ... and that it sees so well ... that the Green Lynx spots the wasps before they themselves get spotted and the Lynx strikes first ... and, in nature, he who pulls the trigger first usually wins



Wonderful creepy pix and narrative, Jack!
Eric


Thanks Eric!


Jack




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« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 09:11:11 PM by John Koerner » Logged
JohnKoerner
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« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2010, 07:41:15 AM »
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Green Lynx Art ...



Green Lynx on Ironweed



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wolfnowl
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« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2010, 04:40:30 PM »
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Jack:  Thought you might like this: Assassin Bug Eats Spiders After Feigning Capture

Everything eats something!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
John R
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« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2010, 06:58:28 PM »
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Jack, these are fine images and I think your emphasis on process and storytelling is the right approach for macro insect photography. It makes everything more interesting. Having said that, I really like the last image!

I find macro (which I seldom do anymore- no digital macro lens) hard work and hard on the eyes. I would like to introduce you to this gentleman's macro-insect work, not only because of his obvious talent, but the incredible depth of field he attains in almost every image. And wait until you see his almost primitive homemade attachment and lighting gear, by today's standards. I think if anyone is interested in macro work, they can learn from this fellow.

http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/post-your-photos/51505-macro-my-macro-photos.html

JMR
« Last Edit: October 28, 2010, 07:02:21 PM by John R » Logged
kikashi
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2010, 12:46:18 PM »
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Jack, these are fine images and I think your emphasis on process and storytelling is the right approach for macro insect photography. It makes everything more interesting. Having said that, I really like the last image!

I find macro (which I seldom do anymore- no digital macro lens) hard work and hard on the eyes. I would like to introduce you to this gentleman's macro-insect work, not only because of his obvious talent, but the incredible depth of field he attains in almost every image. And wait until you see his almost primitive homemade attachment and lighting gear, by today's standards. I think if anyone is interested in macro work, they can learn from this fellow.

http://www.pentaxforums.com/forums/post-your-photos/51505-macro-my-macro-photos.html

JMR
Thanks for the link, John. He takes some stunning photographs!

Jeremy
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #12 on: October 29, 2010, 06:02:37 PM »
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Jack:  Thought you might like this: Assassin Bug Eats Spiders After Feigning Capture
Everything eats something!
Mike.


Fascinating Mike! Thanks for sharing Smiley

What I also found cool was that, sometimes, the spider turned the trick and ate the Assassin Bug anyway

Jack




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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #13 on: October 29, 2010, 06:22:53 PM »
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Jack, these are fine images and I think your emphasis on process and storytelling is the right approach for macro insect photography. It makes everything more interesting. Having said that, I really like the last image!

Thanks John!




I find macro (which I seldom do anymore- no digital macro lens) hard work and hard on the eyes. I would like to introduce you to this gentleman's macro-insect work, not only because of his obvious talent, but the incredible depth of field he attains in almost every image. And wait until you see his almost primitive homemade attachment and lighting gear, by today's standards. I think if anyone is interested in macro work, they can learn from this fellow.

Thank you for the link, and you're right, this fellow does some exceptional work. He's using an extender to go beyond 1:1 macro and looks to be doing some studio shots also. Very, very crisp, clear, and detailed!

By next season, I hope to add the Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macrophoto lens to my gear bag, which takes images up to 5x life-size images.

Most of my macrophotography has been of the subjects themselves, and a little background, but I have seen some amazing work done with ultra-close-up images that make me want to join that club too Smiley

Jack




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