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Author Topic: Highlight Recovery shifts skin tones to magenta  (Read 2238 times)
nemophoto
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« on: September 29, 2010, 04:15:54 PM »
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I've noticed that if you use the Highlight Recovery slider in LR3 too much, it shifts the skin tone to the magenta side. I've found it almost unusable, in most instances, past about 16-20. In fact, in tends to shift the entire image in that direction. Anyone seen this and figured out out to counteract this? Supposedly, Capture One 5 has a better way of dealing with this, but my C1 5 won't work on my desktop (stupidly, can't activate it, gone around and around with tech support, but that's another story), so I can't compare.

Nemo
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elied
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2010, 06:50:21 PM »
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http://www.nikplayer.com/2010/07/invariate-camera-profiles-save-day.html
http://www.nikplayer.com/2010/07/invariate-profiles-for-all.html
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digitaldog
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2010, 07:43:49 PM »
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Its a well known issue that we hope will be resolved in the future. So yes, you can’t push the recovery too far. FWIW, this isn’t an issue with all raw converters (Raw Developer gets it right).

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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2010, 07:51:26 PM »
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bugs me to..... 

suggestions for windows?
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nemophoto
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2010, 09:49:21 AM »
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Bummer that, until they fix the software, no easy fix. Maybe i'll go back to Bibble or something, though that highlight recover wasn't great. It seems the original software Adobe bought to base Lightroom on (the name escapes me, but I owned it and it was pretty good) was much, much better at highlight recovery. I seem to remember being somewhat disappointed in Adobe's application of highlight recovery when it came out, but LR3 seems especially bad.
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John R Smith
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2010, 09:58:45 AM »
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Bummer that, until they fix the software, no easy fix. Maybe i'll go back to Bibble or something, though that highlight recover wasn't great. It seems the original software Adobe bought to base Lightroom on (the name escapes me, but I owned it and it was pretty good) was much, much better at highlight recovery. I seem to remember being somewhat disappointed in Adobe's application of highlight recovery when it came out, but LR3 seems especially bad.

Hmm. That's odd, but it shows me how I am missing a lot of issues because I work in B/W and never see these colour problems. However, when I first got LR3 I felt the HR was much better than previously, becaause it recovered the highlights but did not take so much "punch" out of the top-end of the image as a result.

john
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MBehrens
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« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2010, 01:47:51 PM »
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Has anyone else tried the invariate profiles posted by elied above? I loaded the ones for my cameras and did some experimenting with HR and they do seem to be better. Is this a bad idea to use these profiles, am I setting myself up for other issues?
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elied
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2010, 06:20:29 PM »
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I have been using them for a couple months now, both with Recovery applied when necessary and without any Recovery, and I haven't encountered any problem. (Canon 5D2.)
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digitaldog
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2010, 07:46:30 PM »
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I have been using them for a couple months now, both with Recovery applied when necessary and without any Recovery, and I haven't encountered any problem. (Canon 5D2.)

Here’s a visual example (and not on skin but you’ll see the issues):
http://digitaldog.net/files/RD.jpg
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Andrew Rodney
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2010, 02:11:18 PM »
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Here’s a visual example (and not on skin but you’ll see the issues):
Maybe it's more apparent in the brown/yellow/red part of the spectrum ; I also had this behaviour on a cream/yellow stone wall, that became orange/salmon after recovery (example pushed a tad too far ; the only difference is +60 recovery at the top).
OTOH, I don't see any hue shift on a cloud eg.
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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pegelli
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« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2010, 04:14:43 PM »
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Strange, I'm not seeing any of this colour shift effect with the raw files from my Sony A850. I apply no special profiles (LR3.2, Adobe Standard, process 2010) and the whole calibration box has zeroed sliders.

before is 0 recovery and after is 100 recovery

You can see I averaged a rectangle on one of the walls and when checking in LAB color space a/b goes from 4/33 before to 5/31 after, so again indicating no huge colour shifts.
Also almost fully blown out sky left remains almost neutral grey with maxed out recovery.

Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but I don't seem to have this problem of creating a megenta shift, which is indeed super pronounced in the example above  Huh:


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pieter, aka pegelli
elied
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« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2010, 07:33:01 AM »
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Strange, I'm not seeing any of this colour shift effect with the raw files from my Sony A850. I apply no special profiles (LR3.2, Adobe Standard, process 2010) and the whole calibration box has zeroed sliders.

Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but I don't seem to have this problem of creating a megenta shift, which is indeed super pronounced in the example above  Huh:
The problem does not exist with the Adobe Standard profile because it is not "twisted" the way the DNG Camera Profiles are.
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2010, 07:37:52 AM »
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The problem does not exist with the Adobe Standard profile because it is not "twisted" the way the DNG Camera Profiles are.
And I used it though...

I'd rather think that the RGGB files from Sony are nor treated the same way as my canon (CRW) RGB files?
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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digitaldog
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« Reply #13 on: October 02, 2010, 11:38:16 AM »
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The problem does not exist with the Adobe Standard profile because it is not "twisted" the way the DNG Camera Profiles are.

Pretty sure it does (the examples I provided are Adobe Standard). That profile may produce less shifting but it still shows up.
And the Adobe Standard Profile isn’t a DNG camera profile?
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Andrew Rodney
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elied
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« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2010, 12:45:53 PM »
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And the Adobe Standard Profile isn’t a DNG camera profile?
I thought DNG Camera Profiles is the title of the group of profiles that mimic the color renderings done to jpgs by various cameras, as, for instance, Canon's Picture Styles and whatever the similar renderings are for other brands.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2010, 01:16:42 PM »
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I thought DNG Camera Profiles is the title of the group of profiles that mimic the color renderings done to jpgs by various cameras, as, for instance, Canon's Picture Styles and whatever the similar renderings are for other brands.

Nope although its possible they can be used for this task. My understanding is, a DNG profile is a DNG profile. We can build custom DNG Profiles using the Adobe app or the X-Rite Passport.
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Andrew Rodney
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