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Author Topic: Breathing Color EasyWrappe  (Read 11118 times)
na goodman
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« Reply #20 on: October 28, 2010, 08:50:45 AM »
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Actually tapping on the corner braces does increase the tension.
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kdphotography
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« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2010, 03:31:08 PM »
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The system has corner braces that help to tighten the canvas. There are also cross braces if you need them for larger canvases. I have had some up for a year now that are as tight as the day they were put together. It's a nice system. The issue for me is that the artist I work with want the canvas to wrap around the edge and staple. If you are going to staple than you would not use the glue. I do have some 60" bars here but have not gone that large yet.

Actually, BC strongly recommends that you use the archival glue with the EasyWrappe system.  I also think having the canvas continue around the back edge looks more finished, which is easy enough to do by adding 3/4" of media to each dimension.  The glue is what holds the system together (ha ha), but the staples on the back are more for that traditional finished "look."  It holds that extra media on the rear down, but really doesn't do much in terms of strenthening the wrap.  This is a surprisingly easy system for "standard" canvas print sizes....

 Smiley ken
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larryg
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« Reply #22 on: November 05, 2010, 03:30:46 PM »
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This looks so easy (compared to using stretcher bars)

I want to order a starter supply to try this system out.

I know this is subjective   but is there a standard (or most used) size for your enlargements?

I have files from Hasselblad which are square  and the rest from my 1ds 1  and 1ds mk III

I am trying to figure out what size easywrap bars to order to accomadate the most usage


I am thinking about   using   18x24 or 16 x 24 (without serious cropping) for the Canon   then  using the 16 or 24 bars for my square images.

Any practical experience would be appreciated
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na goodman
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« Reply #23 on: November 05, 2010, 03:35:07 PM »
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It really is a personal preference. I can tell you by the orders I get that I have not done anything smaller than 24"x36".
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larryg
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« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2010, 01:35:19 PM »
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I finished up the 12x16 sample frame  (mirror image of 1.75inches on each side)     This looks great and has a professonal looking finish.

used the glossy glamour II (actually bought it over five years ago and set on shelf never opened, still looks good).  The finish looks great (I did not dilute with matte finish)  added about 25% distilled water (heated to 80 degrees).     No streaks or other blemishes.

the framing part only took about 15 minutes (first time learners curve, I suppose)
I am now going to try and do larger images   My printer is 24" (7600)  so probably 20x30 (on 24" stock)  leaving 2 inches on each side for the part that wraps around.


Anyone do 20 x30?      


« Last Edit: November 27, 2010, 06:17:34 PM by larryg » Logged
Dan Bellyk
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« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2010, 08:13:05 PM »
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I have framed up 5 20x30" using breathing color "Lyve" and also "Crystaline". They turned out very nice. Smiley
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Justan
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« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2011, 04:17:22 PM »
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This was a good thread and one of the few I've come across for the Breathing Color EasyWrappe Pro 1.75” gallery wrap hardware, so I thought I’d revive it.

I'm looking at doing some panos which are 72” long. Breathing Color says they only make these bars in up to 60” but they have a device called an “extender” which permits joining 2 other pieces together. By using the extender one can get longer wraps.

Has anyone used the extender? Does the extender compromise the strength of the frame or make the piece less than straight?

I'm debating going this way compared to doing a surface mount to gatorboard. Not sure if the gallery wrap would have equal or more market appeal than a surface mount.

Comments appreciated.

Thanks!
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Justan
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« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2011, 05:11:24 PM »
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I love the web.

I contacted the vendor and they sent me the following link. Look about half way down the page for a blurb and illustrations on how the extender works. Below that is a note on "fine turning" the finished wrap.

http://www.breathingcolor.com/blog/top-5-printmaking-tipstrickstechniques-%E2%80%93-march-%E2%80%9911/


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neile
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« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2011, 07:45:08 PM »
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I'm debating going this way compared to doing a surface mount to gatorboard. Not sure if the gallery wrap would have equal or more market appeal than a surface mount.

I just did a 40" gallery wrap using the EasyWrappe system and honestly I don't think it holds up as well at the larger size (although I quite like it for smaller pieces). I found it was extremely difficult to get the mirror edge to align with the stretcher bars. I also question in the long run whether their tape plus a small bead of glue will truly hold it secure in the long-term.

Neil
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Neil Enns
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scrinch
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« Reply #29 on: April 30, 2011, 05:10:43 AM »
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It seems to me that the tape really doesn't hold much after the frame is assembled as the canvas is stretched along the bar and is held securely at the corners.  The little metal staples hold the corners together.  Like someone said leaving extra and stapling is an option if one is really concerned about longevity.

I like the system very wel when compared to the traditional method of stretching canvas.  I didn't like the price so went into production for myself doing my own stretchers. For those with a modest amount of wood working skill it isn't a tough project.  You can get glue and tape from United manufacturers, staples and wood from local hardware distributers.
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ftbt
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« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2011, 08:16:53 AM »
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I just did a 40" gallery wrap using the EasyWrappe system and honestly I don't think it holds up as well at the larger size (although I quite like it for smaller pieces). I found it was extremely difficult to get the mirror edge to align with the stretcher bars. I also question in the long run whether their tape plus a small bead of glue will truly hold it secure in the long-term.

Neil

I have done about 10 24" x 36" gallery wraps using the IG Wrap (EasyWrappe) system with the 1.75" bars and they have all come out quite well. The mirror edge alignment on the first two was off by about 1/16th of an inch, but that was due entirely to measuring errors by me and the amount of bleed that I initially factored in. (I now add 2.75" of mirror edge, thereby resulting in a full 1" bleed on all 4 sides ... which makes it easier for me to align the bars and trim the canvas). I just did 2 canvases this week and the mirror edge was spot-on. Now, whether the framed canvas will "hold up as well" is another story. I suppose only time will tell. However my customers like the final product.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2011, 10:44:12 PM by ftbt » Logged
Justan
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« Reply #31 on: April 30, 2011, 10:59:03 AM »
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I just did a 40" gallery wrap using the EasyWrappe system and honestly I don't think it holds up as well at the larger size (although I quite like it for smaller pieces). I found it was extremely difficult to get the mirror edge to align with the stretcher bars. I also question in the long run whether their tape plus a small bead of glue will truly hold it secure in the long-term.

Neil


How does it not hold up well?

The tape holds the sides to the frame. I use double sided ATG tape with traditionally matted prints and it seems very stable.

Do your customers prefer a wrap or a surface mount on gatorboard?
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Justan
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« Reply #32 on: April 30, 2011, 11:03:11 AM »
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It seems to me that the tape really doesn't hold much after the frame is assembled as the canvas is stretched along the bar and is held securely at the corners.  The little metal staples hold the corners together.  Like someone said leaving extra and stapling is an option if one is really concerned about longevity.

I like the system very wel when compared to the traditional method of stretching canvas.  I didn't like the price so went into production for myself doing my own stretchers. For those with a modest amount of wood working skill it isn't a tough project.  You can get glue and tape from United manufacturers, staples and wood from local hardware distributers.

The real beauty of this system is the corner pieces that makes the rest of the process easy.

I do agree that a few minutes with a chop saw and either similar materials or an electric staple gun can produce the same results.
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Justan
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« Reply #33 on: April 30, 2011, 11:07:11 AM »
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I have done about 10 24" x 36" gallery wraps using the IG Wrap (EasyWrappe) system with the 1.75" bars and they have all come out quite well. The mirror edge alignment on the first two was off by about 1/16th of an inch, but that was due entirely to measuring errors by me and the amount of bleed that I initially factored in. (I know add 2.75" of mirror edge, thereby resulting in a full 1" bleed on all 4 sides ... which makes it easier for me to align the bars and trim the canvas). I just did 2 canvases this week and the mirror edge was spot-on. Now, whether the framed canvas will "hold up as well" is another story. I suppose only time will tell. However my customers like the final product.

Help me here. What do you man by “mirror edge?”

Have you done surface mounting? Do customers show a preference for one over the other?
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milt
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« Reply #34 on: April 30, 2011, 01:15:14 PM »
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Since this thread is alive again I thought I would share some tips I developed during the process of doing a couple of dozen of these.

First, for aligning the frame with the picture.  I print the images with mirror-image edges, which almost always makes the exact corners easy to spot on the image side of the canvas.  I take a very fine sewing needle and poke it thru from the front at the exact corner and then place an ink dot on the back of the canvas just *inside* where the needle emerges.  Then I make light pencil lines between these dots. (Doing the lines just a little inside the true corners keeps the lines visible as you position the bar assembly.)

Second, I don't crop my pictures to any specific aspect ratio, so 2 of the framing bars are never exactly the right length, and depending on what I'm after, sometimes 4 are not the right length.  Adjusting the bars is best done in the middle, with a glued splice, not at the ends, where you have to cut at a angle and recreate the brace slot.

Third, after trying both ways, I am now leaving enough canvas to fold over the back.  Its a neater and more secure job.  However, I'm using glue instead of staples on the back for fear of splitting the relatively hard, thin wood of the frames.

Overall, I think I have to salute whoever did the original invention of this system.  It's neat & it's nicely engineered.

--Milt--
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #35 on: April 30, 2011, 03:57:12 PM »
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Just thought I'd add a few notes to this thread.

As far as alignment, when we prepare this system we carefully cut the edge a set distance from mirrorred line, and use some cut pieces of gator board to align the print to the edge.  We have several of these on canvas that are smaller in size that show no signs of losing the bond that attaches.  I believe the glue is critical, and as suggested the corner wedges should be inserted after the glue dries.  Once the glue dries there is less tension on the ATG attached canvas, especially if the corners are inserted after it dries.

We only use the system for smaller canvases, we still hand stretched anything larger.  The main reason is the cost of the stretcher + labor to stretch is less than the large bars.  However, we do have some other products we stretch using the large bars and they have been quite popular.

One other thing I might mention, the system was invented and is manufactured by IGWRAP.  In the US there are 3 distributors of the product ... one that many of you might not be aware of is Liberty Photo. They have been around for a long time (I have been a customer of theirs since the early 90's)  and specialize in distribution to the lab industry, but anyone can purchase from them.  They offer the IGWRAP system as well as many other items, including dye-sub aluminum systems, and novelty photo product production.  They frequently have specials on the easy wrappe items, and I believe offer discounts based on quantities.
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ftbt
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« Reply #36 on: April 30, 2011, 10:51:19 PM »
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Help me here. What do you man by “mirror edge?”

Have you done surface mounting? Do customers show a preference for one over the other?

A "mirror edge" is basically a digital clone of a defined amount of surface area around the four sides of your print that is then bent or folded over the stretcher bars to create the illusion that the print continues over the bars. While you can do it manually in Photoshop, I use "Perfect Resize" by Genuine Fractals. I don't do any canvas surface mounts.
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ftbt
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« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2011, 10:58:54 PM »
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... Liberty Photo.  They frequently have specials on the easy wrappe items, and I believe offer discounts based on quantities.

Basically, same list price as Breathing Color, but Liberty Photo currently has a 25% discount on the IG Wrap products. Pretty good deal!
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Justan
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« Reply #38 on: May 01, 2011, 12:45:26 PM »
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A "mirror edge" is basically a digital clone of a defined amount of surface area around the four sides of your print that is then bent or folded over the stretcher bars to create the illusion that the print continues over the bars. While you can do it manually in Photoshop, I use "Perfect Resize" by Genuine Fractals. I don't do any canvas surface mounts.

Cool! That way one doesn't give up a lot of the image real-estate, so to say, but gains the wrap around effect.

Thanks all for the other tips!!
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Mike Sellers
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« Reply #39 on: May 04, 2011, 09:57:04 AM »
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Does anyone know if the Lexjet Sunset HD Pro Wrap is the same as the BC EasyWrappe?
Mike
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