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Author Topic: Seven Gentlemen  (Read 1043 times)
michswiss
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« on: October 13, 2010, 09:34:47 AM »
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RSL
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« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2010, 09:55:38 AM »
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Jennifer, Fine shot. The oldsters' club meeting to talk over old times.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2010, 11:15:13 AM »
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Jennifer, Fine shot. The oldsters' club meeting to talk over old times.
Agreed.

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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wolfnowl
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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2010, 11:21:28 AM »
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I like it.  My only criticism would be that if you could have moved a step to the right you might have been able to remove the tree from the right edge.  Of course without knowing the scene that may have put you in traffic.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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RSL
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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2010, 11:57:17 AM »
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Mike, I don't often disagree with your judgment, but this time I do. Moving to the right and shooting at an angle would change the whole perspective of this shot. The frontalness, the head-on nature of the picture, is an important part of its impact. I don't see that the little tree is an impediment to the picture, though I do wish Mr. #6 had been looking at the camera.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2010, 02:28:42 PM »
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Mike, I don't often disagree with your judgment, but this time I do. Moving to the right and shooting at an angle would change the whole perspective of this shot. The frontalness, the head-on nature of the picture, is an important part of its impact. I don't see that the little tree is an impediment to the picture, though I do wish Mr. #6 had been looking at the camera.
Russ,

You've got to stop doing this. I mean, saying exactly what I was about to say but saying it before I figured out what I wanted to say!

I often agree with Mike, but as soon as I read his post I felt that his suggestion would ruin the perspective.

I'll admit I might have been tempted to remove the tree with a chainsaw or else with CS5's "content-aware fill."

Very nice image, just as it is.

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
wolfnowl
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« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2010, 03:47:10 PM »
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See!  Everyone gets to have an opinion!!  Ain't life grand...  Grin

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
shutterpup
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2010, 03:49:07 PM »
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I guess if I'd had my druthers, I would have liked to see them engaging in that conversation they gathered for instead of smiling for the camera.
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michswiss
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« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2010, 09:35:32 PM »
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This is part of something I don't know if I'll be able to finish before leaving Shanghai.  Interior / Exterior, Boundaries, Core / Edge.  Basically looking to thematically contrast interior Shanghai against it's edges.  For whatever reason I've decided that I would take a much more direct approach with people for the Edge shots, but that would then be laid next to urban landscapes to give context to their surroundings.  The interior shots will remain mainly "street" in style.

I've only covered about a quarter of the locations I'd like to get to around the edges and I might realistically only have another five weekends left.  Here's hoping winter doesn't settle in too quickly.  Thanks for the feedback.
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Rob C
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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2010, 04:06:07 AM »
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Jenn

And to complicate matters further: my eyes seem to be getting tired over the years, and I sometimes find it hard to hold focus on something - the monitor, for example - without having to look away and focus on another distance and then switch my gaze back to the monitor, at which time it seems perfectly crisp. (I spoke to my doc about this, and he said that it's something that comes with age: the muscles just don't hold their position steadily for any length of time and there's nothing to be done.)

But the point is that you wrote "Shanghai. Interior/Exterior, Boundaries, Core/Edge."

I read: "Shanghai. Interior/exterior boundaries, hardCore/Edge." and that immediately opened up a whole new can of imaginary worms for me.

Yes, I do wear glasses to use the monitor. They used to belong to my mother (the glasses); my own for reading fell and got badly scratched and the right lens provides a delicate, constant blur, somewhat like a Softar. Of course, I did buy another pair for reading, but find they force me to hold a book ten inches from my nose, which if your taste extends to Tachen and Jeanloup Sieff, or even to Lunwerg and Annie Leibovitz, is a very uncomfortable reading position for anyone. For the photo-books I use the Softar pair: close one eye and two dimensions remain two dimensional... nothing's lost.

Rob C
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John R
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« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2010, 06:09:01 PM »
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It looks very good to me. It still has an immediate and spontaneous look to it. And for me, that's more than enough. How one achieves this without intruding on people, or truning them off, I don't know. As soon I point the camera, people alter their stances.

Nice work.

JMR
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