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Author Topic: Changing file attributes in Win7  (Read 2242 times)
walter.sk
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« on: October 14, 2010, 12:18:55 PM »
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I am running CS5 on a Win7 64-bit PC.  I have an internal 1TB hard drive with nothing but folders containing my raw images and the various processed versions of them.  I use an identical drive to back them up.  My backup software is Acronis Home version, and because I don't want the usual compressed backup files, I use Acronis to clone my data drive, every couple of days.

Not wanting to put the drives through such extensive use so often, what I would like to do is mark the files on the data drive as "backed up", and then copy only the newer files to the backup drive after each photo processing session.  Years back it was simple to change the attributes of files, but I can't find any way to do this in Win7.  The problem is compounded by the fact that even though my folders are arranged chronologically, I often process one or more images in older folders, and sometimes save them in other folders.

Is there any simple way to do such incremental copying of files for backup purposes without having to buy another backup program?  And please don't suggest Lightroom, as I have found because of the way I use my files, it further complicates my workflow.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2010, 12:20:32 PM by walter.sk » Logged
Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2010, 12:53:22 PM »
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I use SynchToy that was originally developed by Microsoft and it does just what you want, only copies new files or deletes those that have been deleted from the parent drive.  I've been using it for a year with no problems.  See:  http://www.windows7download.com/win7-synctoy/ktkvegbc.html
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walter.sk
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2010, 02:02:16 PM »
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I use SynchToy that was originally developed by Microsoft and it does just what you want, only copies new files or deletes those that have been deleted from the parent drive.  I've been using it for a year with no problems.  See:  http://www.windows7download.com/win7-synctoy/ktkvegbc.html
Great!

Thanks for the link!  I just tried it and it took about 2-3 minutes to compare my 2 drives and "echo" the new files and folders on the data drive to the backup drive.  Fantastic!
« Last Edit: October 14, 2010, 02:48:10 PM by walter.sk » Logged
Langsey
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« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2010, 06:06:28 PM »
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I switched from Acronis to Synctoy. I have it set to update automatically on certain days. I did this thru task scheduler
Start>All Programs>Accessories>System Tools>Task Scheduler. I am happier with Synctoy. It is very simple to use.
John
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feppe
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« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2010, 06:49:16 PM »
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I am running CS5 on a Win7 64-bit PC.  I have an internal 1TB hard drive with nothing but folders containing my raw images and the various processed versions of them.  I use an identical drive to back them up.  My backup software is Acronis Home version, and because I don't want the usual compressed backup files, I use Acronis to clone my data drive, every couple of days.

Not wanting to put the drives through such extensive use so often, what I would like to do is mark the files on the data drive as "backed up", and then copy only the newer files to the backup drive after each photo processing session.  Years back it was simple to change the attributes of files, but I can't find any way to do this in Win7.  The problem is compounded by the fact that even though my folders are arranged chronologically, I often process one or more images in older folders, and sometimes save them in other folders.

Is there any simple way to do such incremental copying of files for backup purposes without having to buy another backup program?  And please don't suggest Lightroom, as I have found because of the way I use my files, it further complicates my workflow.

A few points not mentioned.

Hard drives are meant to be used, I have cheap consumer HDDs running (as in transferring data, not just idling or on standby) 24/7 literally for years. Hard drives also fail, that's why you should always have multiple backups. Minimum is one local on-site and one off-site. Only one backup is not really useful. What happens if you have a fire, water damage, or your computer gets stolen?

I'm not sure how Synctoy backs up, but dozens of incremental backups can be a nightmare to recover - you might have to recover each and every single backup, starting from the first one and going one-by-one to the last one. You should occasionally verify the backups against the original files in case of bad sectors or copying errors, or start a new rolling backup every week/month.

FWIW here my backup setup.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2010, 06:55:44 PM by feppe » Logged

walter.sk
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2010, 08:12:32 PM »
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Only one backup is not really useful. What happens if you have a fire, water damage, or your computer gets stolen?

I'm not sure how Synctoy backs up, but dozens of incremental backups can be a nightmare to recover -

FWIW here my backup setup.
Thanks for the link to  your backup setup.  I back up my photos to the internal drive, and to an external one as well. 

SyncToy actually syncs the two drives, with many options.  It does not do a "backup" per se.  It copies onto the backup drive all of the new files and/or folders I have added to my pictures drive.  It does not make separate "increments,"  and does not use the usual backup paradigm of making one huge file that has to be read by a backup program.  When it finishes, my internal backup drive looks exactly like my internal data drive.

Up until I found out about SyncToy, I had accomplished this by copying the entire picture drive to the backup drive, even if only a couple of files were added or changed.  I now can do that in a couple of minutes instead of hours.  After it is done, I do a regular backup to one of my external drives.
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milt
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« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2010, 04:00:48 PM »
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You might also want to take a look at Oops! Backup.  It's the only Windows program I've seen that does a sensible job of doing "versioning" backup (like Time Machine on Mac).  Ask yourself this question, supposing a file gets deleted or corrupted on your primary device and its a long time before you notice.  Does your backup scheme permit you to recover?

--Milt--
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Bill Koenig
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« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2010, 11:43:42 AM »
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I use "Second copy 8" Its about $30.00, but you can try it free for I think 30 days. I have it running in the background and set to back up once every hour, but you could set it once every 10 minuets if you like, or every 10 days, what ever. You can set it to copy to as many drives as you want.
I never have to think about backups it once its set up, great app.

http://www.centered.com/support.html
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PeterAit
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2010, 04:31:33 PM »
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And SyncBack Pro is a "cheap-ware" program that is like SyncToy on steroids with a PhD.
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Peter
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walter.sk
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« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2010, 05:20:57 PM »
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Well, Sync Toy seems to be just what I needed, but thanks for the other suggestions, which I will eventually get to try.
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