Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Platinum/Palladium Printing Question  (Read 6771 times)
David Saffir
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 172


WWW
« on: November 03, 2010, 02:48:04 PM »
ReplyReply

I just got interested in this type of printmaking. Was wondering just how steep the learning curve is for coating the paper,
timing exposure, and the like. My darkroom days are long gone....

David

Logged

JohnBrew
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 755


WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2010, 12:01:08 PM »
ReplyReply

David, may I suggest you try to find a copy of Black & White Photography, May 2009. There is a terrific article by David Chow where he instructs two neophytes in the platinum/palladium process and in less than one day they are printing like pros.
Logged

dkoons
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24


« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2010, 10:12:24 PM »
ReplyReply

One source I have used in the past is Bostick and Sullivan. They sell kits on various printing processes.  Salt prints might be a way to practice with coating........it is less expensive and prints out with sunlight. You may discover that the coating isn't the problem, but, getting a negative that will print well. Have fun  dan
Logged
aduke
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 366


« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2010, 10:53:25 PM »
ReplyReply

The alt-photo-process list has been around for many years, populated with a number of very experienced people. You might look at the information available at http://homepage.usask.ca/~gjh289/photo/faq.html#ALT-PHOTO-PROCESS

Alan
Logged
donbga
Jr. Member
**
Online Online

Posts: 96


« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2010, 08:45:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Swing over to HybridPhoto.com and meet David Chow in person so to speak. There is a ton of information to be found there covering alternative process printing with digital negatives.

Don Bryant
HybridPhoto.com Moderator
Logged
langier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 654



WWW
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2010, 09:56:18 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi David,

If you've worked in a darkroom, you've got a start in Platinum/Palladium printing.

A good source for both classes and supplies is Photographer's Formulary in Condon, MT. They've got a good website and the instructors are some of the best!

Dick Artenz who I had the pleasure to photograph with in the southwest in the 1970s was one of first to revive this process in the late 20th century and  is one of the masters of the craft.

Another master is Tom Millea. The Pt/Pd process nearly killed him several years ago and he's now transitioned into digital with the same magnificent craft.

If you do get into the process, learn the hazards of the craft and work safely!
Logged

Larry Angier
ASMP, NAPP, ACT, and many more!

Webmaster, RANGE magazine
Editor emeritus, NorCal Quarterly

web--http://www.angier-fox.photoshelter.com
facebook--larry.angier
twitter--#larryangier
google+LarryAngier
EBBS
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 28


WWW
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2010, 04:21:05 PM »
ReplyReply

David,
I started Pt/Pd printing from digital neg. in the spring of this year.  There is quite a bit to learn.  I do recommend Dick Arentz book.  You can get a PDF version now of his hard to find 2nd edition.  It has taken some time and many frustrating nights but I am starting to make progress.  I haven’t had much time to devote to the process but it is fun and different than just hitting print.

Matt
Logged

Every day is a good day, just some are better than others!
Visit My Website
tim wolcott
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 468


WWW
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2010, 04:24:31 PM »
ReplyReply

I have not looked at these books.  But I did learn from a master printer named George Phillips.  The first thing is to set certain standards.  Like Temp, how your paper is coated, humidity basically the variables.  

The second is to use the Gray scale to set your standards up and do NOT use any image until this is set.  Remember the gray scale will set all of the outer perimeters of the way you decide to print with your variables.  This is very crutial.  Once these are set you will be able to print anything.  Because the grayscale is a wider space than what you will certainly shoot.

I invented this for the Smithsonian using digital negs in 1997.  If anyone needs to chat about this please feel free.  I have been asked to write a book on all of the processes like (Evercolor, carbon prints, Inkjet ect) that I have worked on but I'm not a writer but I am interested in passing on any help I can give.  Please remember California Time.    9095841720 Lab and 9098789214 gallery   Thanks Tim

P.S.  When you use the grayscale, use the largest grayscale you can get.  This will allow you to modify your image later and pick the exact values you will want in the print. 
« Last Edit: November 21, 2010, 04:36:13 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad