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Author Topic: Uk Locations  (Read 6411 times)
DiaAzul
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« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2005, 05:04:51 PM »
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"Old World" !!!!  But we have new stuff as well  :p

In the UK, there is the angel of the north, which is a relatively new statue in Gateshead Angel of the North

And in the really Old World of France (where I live) we have the Milau Vaiduct which opened at the end of last year
Milau Viaduct

Back in Scotland there is the worlds only rotating boat lift at Falkirk
Falkirk Wheel

It's not all old rocks and monuments...and we don't go round in old hessian sacks taking pictures under a black cloth using a view camera  ::   We have heard of film cameras you know  Cheesy
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2005, 07:07:17 PM »
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Okay Lisa you beat be the strangness front! How about something pre 1900?

I don't think there's much of anything in my little part of the world that's pre-1900.  A few years ago, there was a ruckus in the next suburb about whether it was worth preserving the oldest structure in town, which was a decaying adobe shed from the 1930s.  No kidding.

That's why I love the old stuff in Europe so much; I can't get anything like it at home.  If I were to go a little further afield, I could get to Old West ghost towns, but even that isn't all that old (late 1800's or so).

And yes, DiaAzul, I know there are new things in Europe (I've been there many times).  That Milau bridge (which I've seen articles on recently) is wonderful.  Perhaps the terms "Old World" and "New World" are not as commonly used there as they are here - here, they are primarily used as geographical descriptions - "New World" for the Americas, "Old World" for Europe/Africa/Asia (where does Australia fit? I don't know).  No "old" vs. "new" value judgments are implied.

Lisa
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nnmmaa
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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2005, 07:12:51 AM »
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I've skimmed the replies you have received. Most stress what I might call the dramtic landscape. Some say the UK doesn't approach the photographic possibilities of the US. Maybe I have a different take on this.  I view much of the English countryside as a living museum; a lot of the old is preserved, with much that is modern out of view. The very green rolling hillsides, dotted with small farms, are spectacular in their own way. Little, actually tiny, country roads are superb for viewing. Stay off the highways unless you are going a long distance. Turner,a famous landscape painter, trod these rolling hills and valleys and I doubt he was ever at a loss for inspiration. The villages of the English countryside are not to be missed. If one dosen't find them photogenic and nostalgic it is the imagination that need calibrating. Oh, and then there are the gardens - everywhere.  

A couple of specific suggestions are the Cotswold and Cornwall villages and surrounding countryside. These are separated geographically, but nothing an American driver can't reach in a day.

If any of this interests you, you need to do some research. Go beyond the Fodor-style guides. BTW walking the English countryside is a great pleasure, if you are so inclined. There are many walking paths of incredible beauty that are hundreds of years old. In planning your trip of two weeks, keep the weather firmly in mind. For example, summer in the Cotswold is not as rainy as many other parts. A week of rain could really (dare I say) dampne things.
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russwhe
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« Reply #23 on: January 08, 2005, 05:51:53 AM »
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Well after the feedback I have got and looking on the web I have formed a plan. How does a online database of UK photographic spots so if anyone is visiting our great island they know where to go. As well as where the nearest camera shops are info on accomodation could be good. Has some one already done this or have i stublmed on a great idea?
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AGW
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« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2005, 10:54:13 AM »
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I was a wee bit surprised to see the attempt to compare the oportunities for landscape photography in the UK against those in the western US. When you try to compare things that are completely different you generally end up missing the point. The point being...they are completely different!!!
I think that there have been plenty links posted to show the potential...which is vast. I was particularly pleased to see Wims pics of Arran (including Mrs Davidsons front door at the Glen rosa camp site!). Arran falls within my responsibility and I work hard a making sure the quality of the landscape and wildlife is maintained. I was supposed to be there today, but the storm stoped the ferry sailing. Arran is normally the most accessible of the bigger islands and a great place for a weekend break!

Graeme
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AGW
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« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2005, 02:57:34 PM »
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Hi Wim
No damage done here...but it did stop all the transport links.
Glad to hear you are comming back for more ....enjoy yourself.

Graeme
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Joja
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« Reply #26 on: January 22, 2005, 04:01:12 PM »
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btw during my staying in the uk, i will regurarly add new photographs on my My Website  :laugh:
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Joja
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« Reply #27 on: January 23, 2005, 09:48:21 AM »
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thats very friendly! i would be happy the get advice on places to stay!
im familiar with their work and indeed its fantastic!

sorry for asking, where is northumberland..? im -not yet- familiar with the areanames and i dont have a map with them (i do have a regurar one, but it doesnt mention areanames)
i know i urgeantly need one ;-)

ive also heard that the north-east coast (northern part of england, almost against the border of scotland) is wonderfull ..

thanks!
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DiaAzul
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« Reply #28 on: January 23, 2005, 10:39:40 AM »
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This may help with English Counties:

County Map
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Ben Rubinstein
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« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2005, 03:33:57 PM »
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hmmm, where to start...

Do a search on the internet for UK photography, look at some stock sites and see what type of photography is done here.

Two weeks is very little to conver this incredible island, methinks that if you would like to travel the whole UK then you won't get any serious landscape photography done unless you do some very, very in depth research.

I would suggest concentrating on the Highlands of Scotland and the Lake District, spend a week at each.

Film is readily bought here though the prices may be expensive if you do not want to be x-rayed too much, the airports are as if not more anal retentive about film as in the US, don't even bother asking.

There is no special 'UK' filter  :p  though keep in mind that it can be very rainy in the UK even at the height of summer.

Do research, find out where you think you would like to go and then ask again.
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Joja
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« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2005, 05:44:27 PM »
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by the way, how did you get that beautiful glow on the water in front of eilan dohan castle..? did you use a flashlight orso..?
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Joja
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« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2005, 12:11:33 PM »
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thanks for the advice pom!
by the way i dont live in the us, i leave in that litle country which is wel known for the chocolate and the beer ;-) (just on the other side of the channel)
i live (now) like euhm .. 500km orso from cardif... :-)
you said 'I travelled down from the Isle of Skye ' does that mean that youll live on that beautifull isle? been there, done that ;-) i would love to go over there again!
the problem for whales is that i wont have a car there .. so im limited when it comes to visiting locations. thats why i asked for places to stay (but i meant it in a meaning of a kind of 'base camp' from where youll leave to your locations on food or bike orso..)
if i wasnt limited then i would certanly re-visit the isle of skye and glen coe ...
in there any chance on snow in the snowdon area, or in the nebourhood of cardif when i arrive (beginning of february)
i stay for a while, so i will certainly have the chance to photograph spring :-), and maybe summer
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Graham Welland
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« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2005, 08:58:33 PM »
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I look at pom's images and find it a bit hard to just take on faith that UK can't compare with the western US.  Yes, my MVs.

Generally speaking, "old" western US is practically new in Europe.  I once lived in Duxburry, Mass.  The really old cemetaries there were populated with people leaving the old life in Europe.
Well, as someone who lives in both the Pacific NW and in the UK I can absolutely vouch for the fact that the UK can't match the western US for scenery!!

Now don't get me wrong, the UK has loads of fantastic scenery if you search for it or travel to the extremities but you don't get the same access to good light nor is it easy to get away from the marks of humanity EVERYWHERE. Wild scenic vistas with big sky aren't that easy to find, particularly in the south.

As mentioned though, if you want ancient architecture, buildings, villages, castles, churches, graveyards .... it's just a shame that it's like living under a dull grey sky so often.

There is a lot of photographic opportunity but I do find that you need to work a little harder here to capture it. (Unless you live in Yorkshire, the moors, lakes, Scotland, Wales etc).
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Graham
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« Reply #33 on: January 08, 2005, 08:21:44 PM »
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Outdoor Photographer and Photography Monthly produce such information on a location by location basis but not a centralised site of anytype that I've seen. It would be a great thing to have such a consolidated resource though.
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Graham
Joja
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« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2005, 05:24:38 AM »
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some locations can be found on light and land website
one of the locations where i was looking for was the arch on the beach... thanks to light and land i now know that it is in dorset
if im looking for a certain kind of scenery, then i can check their site, and look or that 'kind of scenery' is represented there and decide on that basis or it suits my needs ...
or use the areaname to do a more comprehensive websearch..
also outdoor photography (i think the british 'sister' of outdoor photographer) regurarly publishes photographs together with a map. if youll see more than ones, photographs of an interesting area, then youll can use the areaname for a more comprehensive search..
those way youll can get a 'decent' visual impression of a certain area and decide or its worthwhile to check it out.. and photograp it in your own way

by the way, is there a camerastore nearby cardiff where i can buy lee filters..? i can use some more and theyre a lot cheaper in the uk (at least by robert white) than here.
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Wim van Velzen
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« Reply #35 on: January 12, 2005, 02:40:13 PM »
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Hi Graeme,

Survived the heavy gales? I heard on the radio that this was about the worst storm in years. Much damage done to the woodlands?

We (that's my wife and two sons) hope to visits the Western Isles this year... But Arran is great indeed!


BTW, it seems that most American photographers that a real landscape photograph should show no human influence. But let's face it: most landscapes are influenced by man, so why not make pictures of that relationship of people and the land they live in?
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russwhe
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« Reply #36 on: January 12, 2005, 04:58:05 PM »
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Okay Lisa you beat be the strangness front! How about something pre 1900?
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Joja
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« Reply #37 on: January 22, 2005, 03:58:13 PM »
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the pembrokshire coastline, cornwall and snowdonia (again) are very high on my location list.
ill hope that there will ly some snow when i arrive over twee weeks ... :cool:
btw nice tip about Joe Cornish, i have his stunning book -somewhere- here! when youll mentioned it i remembered that he also added the locations of each photograph...
its a great aide to get some id how a certain location looks like (or could ;-)
thanks to all of you !!
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Lisa Nikodym
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« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2005, 10:27:19 AM »
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sorry for asking, where is northumberland..?

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ive also heard that the north-east coast (northern part of england, almost against the border of scotland) is wonderfull ..

You've just answered your own question.  Smiley
That's exactly where it is.

Lisa
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