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Author Topic: Amateur requesting professional advice  (Read 2743 times)
u2jimbo
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« on: November 13, 2010, 02:08:17 AM »
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Hi:
I would like to make the leap from dye based printing to pigment.  I currently use a Canon i9900 13x19 printer.  It has provided flawless service and high quality output.  However, my photography has become a more serious pastime and I am becoming concerned about the longevity of dye ink prints since I am beginning to mat and frame them.

I am seeking suggestions for how to prepare for the transition, i.e. particular knowledge, skills or experience specific to pigment ink usage that would serve me well to acquire prior to purchasing a new printer.

Thanks
Jim Simpson
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2010, 04:11:32 AM »
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Disclaimer: I'm no "Pro" (as desired by the OP)

For black and white:
You might consider carbon based inks (e.g. Piezography) for stunning b/w prints.

Or - if you want really interesting long-lasting (b/w) prints you might consider printing inter-negatives and make contact copies in Platinum/Pallidium printing technique, which is relatively easy to learn, but requires dealing with some chemicals and wet darkroom equipment. The good news: You don't need an enlarger and can calibrate the process to get near WYSIWYG results.
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u2jimbo
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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2010, 01:56:05 AM »
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Christoph:
I would probably have been better served if I hadn't asked for 'Professional' advice - rather experienced advice...  I appreciate your taking the time to respond and make suggestions. 

Clearly, I am a newbie.  I have no knowledge of the printing technologies / techniques you suggest.  I shoot very little black & white and don't have space for a wet darkroom.  My interests are in color landscape photography and I'm set up for digital processing.  I'm pretty sure it will be some time before my skills mature and I begin experimenting with alternatives.

Since my post I purchased The Luminous Landscape video on printing and followed that up with Real World Image Sharpening - whoa, I have a lot to learn - that is a complex topic.  When I try to 'see' and make good aesthetic decisions around sharpening, I can tell my developing & printing skills will take awhile to mature regardless of whether it is with dye or pigment inks...

Thanks again.
Jim
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2010, 08:49:11 AM »
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Hi,

There is not much about pigment based inks compared to dye. I'd consider buying Reichmann & Schewes excellent video tutorial from Camera To Print.

One observation may be that pigment inks don't give a high gloss surface, that was possible with dye.

Best regards
Erik


Hi:
I would like to make the leap from dye based printing to pigment.  I currently use a Canon i9900 13x19 printer.  It has provided flawless service and high quality output.  However, my photography has become a more serious pastime and I am becoming concerned about the longevity of dye ink prints since I am beginning to mat and frame them.

I am seeking suggestions for how to prepare for the transition, i.e. particular knowledge, skills or experience specific to pigment ink usage that would serve me well to acquire prior to purchasing a new printer.

Thanks
Jim Simpson
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PeterAit
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« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2010, 08:51:26 AM »
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I applaud your desire to be prepared, but really the switch is no big deal. You'll have to get used to the image appearance of the new printer, and possibly alter your "development" accordingly, but I don't see why there would be any change in your shooting practices or workflow. Make sure your monitor is calibrated and you are using the proper profiles and you're ready to go.
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
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