Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: R G B  (Read 1629 times)
Timo Löfgren
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 200



« on: December 06, 2010, 04:32:37 AM »
ReplyReply

......
Logged
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2925


« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 09:07:11 AM »
ReplyReply

The first one definitely is worthwhile, however the other two had me reaching for my sunglasses. Your compositions are as usual spot on but the saturation seem to be your weakness?  Smiley
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 01:20:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Like the middle one best - it ¡s actually far too cold here in Mallorca to appreciate pictures of cold places. There's a nice rich colour to the middle one that I like, quite apart from the shapes.

I'm currently experimenting with what's cheaper: burning electricity or the usual wood fire. Wood costs me (last lot in Jan/Feb) 400€ a ton; in bad winters we used to burn three of them and in not so bad ones, around one-and-a-half, with electricity also being used quite heavily. The bills that crash into the box before April will reveal all... but mainly the state of the bank account. ;-(

Rob C

Logged

John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1047


« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2010, 12:22:20 AM »
ReplyReply

I like them all and much prefer your colour versions to the BW versions. As to the colour complaints, this is nothing new. Velvia film and others film makes always produce such colours. Agfa was always known for more muted tones and reproducing pastels beautifully. And supposedly, some of the Kodak films were closer to reality. All the makes had their versions for skin tones and people images. But they all have their palettes. In an age where people can turn mediocre and bad colour images into BW by digital means into something acceptable, this film palette looks just fine to me.

JMR
Logged
RSL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6565



WWW
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2010, 09:36:18 AM »
ReplyReply

Timo, I'm afraid I don't agree with John. Your B&Ws are stunning because, it appears, you're a master of tone mapping. But though the composition and subject matter in these color shots are excellent they come across to me as roughly the equivalent of travel posters. My beef is the boosted color saturation. As John said, without quite saying it, Velvia always gave oversaturated results. So did Kodachrome. But once you get a picture into digital form either with a digital camera or with a scanner you have complete control over the colors. Overstaurated colors always sell well at "art fairs," but I've always suspected that once a buyer gets his colorful treasure home and hangs it on a wall for six months he's going to find that he just can't stand to look at it any longer. But then, possibly not.
Logged

michswiss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 270


WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2010, 09:41:58 AM »
ReplyReply

I agree about the levels of saturation and vibrancy.  Given the level of tonal variation, it almost looks like this is an intermediate step in your workflow to get to a B&W image.
Logged

Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8304



WWW
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2010, 10:13:28 AM »
ReplyReply

I agree with Russ and Michswiss. Your black-and-white work always speaks to my soul, but these are merely pretty, and the saturation works to eliminate the magic that your B&W work has.

Eric
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
kikashi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4123



« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2010, 12:14:51 PM »
ReplyReply

I agree about the levels of saturation and vibrancy.  Given the level of tonal variation, it almost looks like this is an intermediate step in your workflow to get to a B&W image.
That was exactly my thought. I find your b&w photos stunning, Timo, and these just don't excite the same awe.

Jeremy
Logged
Timo Löfgren
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 200



« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2010, 12:22:21 PM »
ReplyReply

I describe many of the landscapes and color film deal, however, almost all black and white because I like them a lot more. However, I have the original color film so many times I want to do them in color.
Then you do not laugh at my 'brilliant' 'language skills (Google translator.) Grin Grin Grin

Timo Löfgren
« Last Edit: December 07, 2010, 12:32:59 PM by Timo Löfgren » Logged
RSL
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6565



WWW
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2010, 02:15:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Timo, Your language skills are just fine. I spent most of my childhood in northern Michigan where many of my playmates were Finnish and I still can't speak Finnish. I have one sister in law who can, though.

I'll say it again: when the next B&W magazine portfolio contest starts, get a portfolio to them. It's been a long time since I've seen anyone do black and white the way you're doing it.
Logged

tokengirl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 360



« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2010, 02:31:12 PM »
ReplyReply

I'm a big fan of your B&W photos.  These color ones, not so much.  It's not that they're bad, it's just that they don't have that "special" look that your B&W images do.  Although I do really like the third one's composition and I think it would be terrific in B&W.
Logged
michswiss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 270


WWW
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2010, 04:51:54 AM »
ReplyReply

I describe many of the landscapes and color film deal, however, almost all black and white because I like them a lot more. However, I have the original color film so many times I want to do them in color.
Then you do not laugh at my 'brilliant' 'language skills (Google translator.) Grin Grin Grin

Timo Löfgren

Did I understand correctly.  These are film?  The reason I ask is that I'm shooting Provia these days exactly because it does have so much vibrancy and saturation.  Colours tend to look washed out given the dusty nature of the place as well as the oh so common flat light.  But, I don't think I'd use this film in brighter, more contrasty situations.  It could burn retinas.
Logged

EduPerez
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 696


WWW
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2010, 06:44:15 AM »
ReplyReply

The second one looks a bit over-saturated to me, too. But the third one has the exact color to make me feel cold just by looking at it.
Logged

David Saffir
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 172


WWW
« Reply #13 on: December 13, 2010, 09:39:00 PM »
ReplyReply

the middle shot is my favorite of the tree. Nice composition, definitely have a good foreground, middle ground, and background. Color is great.
Time of day for the shot makes the light a little harsh - maybe a little earlier? (this is a dawn shot?)

David Saffir


GuruShots Photo Critique
If you'd like pro advice and full professional critique
see GuruShots Photo Critique. I'm a contributor there.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad