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Author Topic: Don't try this at home: Ancient Murrelet + Kayak + 1120mm  (Read 3398 times)
Glenn Bartley
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« on: December 06, 2010, 12:01:12 PM »
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This species is definitely one of the trickier North American birds out there to photograph. Being Alcids they are basically impossible to photograph from shore meaning that a vessel of some sort is required. The problem is that by the time they come south the weather is generally nasty and the ocean rough. I had been waiting for 2 years to get a window of opportunity to try for these guys and finally got it early in November. After several attempts I finally got a few shots that I am very proud of.

Hope you enjoy this one!



Camera Model: Canon EOS 7D
Shutter speed: 1/1250 sec
Aperture: 8
ISO: 400
Focal length: 500mm + 1.4x
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2010, 12:12:59 PM »
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Another in your very impressive series.

I have to ask: How on earth do you control the camera with 1120mm of lens in a rocking kayak?
Congratulations on capturing the murrelet!

Eric
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Roger Calixto
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« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2010, 01:22:57 PM »
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Nice shot, I love the texture of the water.

I so would have flipped the kayak.

Roger
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Glenn Bartley
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« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2010, 05:28:08 PM »
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Another in your very impressive series.

I have to ask: How on earth do you control the camera with 1120mm of lens in a rocking kayak?
Congratulations on capturing the murrelet!

Eric

It certainly wasnt easy. I have practiced quite a lot and worked on my technique. But it is very tough!!
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k bennett
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« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2010, 08:17:27 PM »
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Oh, come on, hand holding ten kilos or so of camera and lens in a small kayak, aiming at a tiny moving target, keeping your balance, getting it in focus, nailing the moment -- all this sounds pretty easy, no?

Great shot -- nicely done.
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Glenn Bartley
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2010, 08:44:10 AM »
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Oh, come on, hand holding ten kilos or so of camera and lens in a small kayak, aiming at a tiny moving target, keeping your balance, getting it in focus, nailing the moment -- all this sounds pretty easy, no?

Great shot -- nicely done.

 Grin
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2010, 09:37:24 AM »
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Oh, come on, hand holding ten kilos or so of camera and lens in a small kayak, aiming at a tiny moving target, keeping your balance, getting it in focus, nailing the moment -- all this sounds pretty easy, no?

Great shot -- nicely done.
Of course it's easy. I think Glenn does it something like this: He carries a light-weight 300-foot tripod with him in the kayak. When he spies an Ancient Murrelet (or Ivorybill Woodpecker) within range, he quietly reaches over to the right of the kayak, extends all 100 sections of each leg until the tripod is firmly on the ocean bottom. In deeper water he may have to attach and use the 200-foot center tube, but that may lessen the IQ of the image.

The rest is a piece of cake.   Grin

Eric
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francois
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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2010, 09:41:23 AM »
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I have to ask: How on earth do you control the camera with 1120mm of lens in a rocking kayak?
Congratulations on capturing the murrelet!
I guess that frigid water and the price of a 500 f/4 lens make wonders!  Grin

By the way, it's a lovely photo.
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Francois
Enda Cavanagh
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« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2010, 11:46:57 AM »
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Ya like what's the big deal.  Grin Great shot and well done
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ronkruger
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« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2010, 06:34:06 PM »
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You have every right to be proud of this shot.
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2010, 01:02:18 AM »
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Very nice I don't have that one.  But I will tell you are one of the few like me who will shoot from a kayak or canoe.  I have been for years shooting from a canoe or carrying my Phase into the water with waiters on standing in water upto my chest.  So hats off to you to.  Sometimes you have to test fate to get the great ones.  Tim
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ronkruger
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« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2010, 04:06:41 PM »
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Kayaks and canoes are great ways to shoot birds. Nearly every shot in my "Shore Birds" gallery were taken from a PokeBoat (like a cross between a kayak and canoe, made for hunting). Birds and animals are less afraid of things floating on or in the water, so can be approached more closely. It is not, however, a very stable platform, which gives me great appreciation for the OPs shot.
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In the end, the only things that matter are the people we help and the people we hurt. Google Ron Kruger and click on any link to Photoshelter
degrub
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« Reply #12 on: December 19, 2010, 07:39:35 PM »
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Have you considered attaching an outrigger ? Stabilizes the boat.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outrigger_canoe


Frank
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ronkruger
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« Reply #13 on: December 19, 2010, 09:13:37 PM »
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Have you considered attaching an outrigger ? Stabilizes the boat.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outrigger_canoe


Frank

Thanks Frank. I did, but it wasn't practical. It is much more stable when the water is calm, actually less stable when rough, which is most of the time. The biggest problem is an outrigger gets in the way when sneaking along the bank or up into tight places. Even with the added stability on calm days, you still can't brace the camera on anything, but must still shoot hand-held, so there is little practical gain.
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In the end, the only things that matter are the people we help and the people we hurt. Google Ron Kruger and click on any link to Photoshelter
John R
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« Reply #14 on: December 19, 2010, 09:16:52 PM »
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Great shot. It took while, but I finally noticed the droplets on the bird. Even better!

JMR
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Brian Carey
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« Reply #15 on: December 21, 2010, 05:31:43 PM »
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Hi Glenn you should be proud of it, great shot!
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