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Author Topic: How to ICC profile a camera? (no DNG)  (Read 11405 times)
Nino Loss
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« Reply #60 on: December 26, 2010, 03:34:04 PM »
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Most digital camera sensors respond differently under different illuminants (e.g., switching from daylight to tungsten). DNG camera profiles address these differences by allowing color adjustments to be specified separately for two different illuminants (usually Illuminants A and D65). See info here.

I was aware of that, just what should do for a studio shoot. I don't get what that be should be good for?
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #61 on: December 26, 2010, 04:22:08 PM »
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I was aware of that, just what should do for a studio shoot. I don't get what that be should be good for?

A good thread with an explanation by Erin Chan is here.
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #62 on: December 27, 2010, 02:03:37 AM »
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A good thread with an explanation by Erin Chan is here.
Thanks for that link, Chris. I had read that too. Still, I don't see what that should do for a pure studio work, for fashion and products?

towards the end of that thread:
[...]
If all you shoot is under daylight such as in landscapes then a single table is all that's necessary.

and than, as mentioned in this whole thread here and elsewhere, DNG "profiling" wont do that much for you. Just think, that middle formats RAW converters, like PhaseOne/Mamyia/Leaf, do not use DNG. Only ICC profiling there. And if you believe them, it has theoretical and practical reasons.

From what I understood till now, DNG is/was geared to photographers shooting under various lighting conditions and/or not willing to invest in professional means like targets and a ICC software (the now legacy ProfileMaker ... ~2K U$D). But what interests me, and I am certain a lot of others, is a pure studio perspective with tightly controlled lighting conditions. I don't mind to spend time, effort and money to get to the best result.

regards

EDIT: "[...]Camera profiling is appropriate for static shooting conditions such as a studio setup.   Raw calibration is more appropriate for dynamic shooting conditions.  [...]" Rags Gardner http://www.rags-int-inc.com/PhotoTechStuff/ColorCalibration/
« Last Edit: December 27, 2010, 11:27:46 AM by Nino Loss » Logged
Chris_Brown
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« Reply #63 on: December 27, 2010, 12:40:38 PM »
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Yes, I agree.

Since you were having such a difficult time with Basiccolor, I thought maybe ACR calibration with dual-illuminants would help you. Why dual-illuminant? Because I don't know how you work and you may be a guy who whips out a 1000W fresnel at times (I do).
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #64 on: December 27, 2010, 01:54:20 PM »
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Yes, I agree.

Since you were having such a difficult time with Basiccolor, I thought maybe ACR calibration with dual-illuminants would help you. Why dual-illuminant? Because I don't know how you work and you may be a guy who whips out a 1000W fresnel at times (I do).

you are right, I could be that guy ;-) BTW, I'm sorry if that didn't come across, but I truly appreciate your help!

The result with the simple scanner software, EZcolor, is astonishing though. I still try to feed that .cie file to Argyll.

regards
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #65 on: December 27, 2010, 07:52:42 PM »
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Going back to one of my earlier questions about input gamma curves, I think Basiccolor uses a gamma that doesn't work with any resulting TIFF file produced from a raw processor program. Just a guess, though. Their site is pretty cryptic.
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #66 on: December 28, 2010, 07:45:17 AM »
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Going back to one of my earlier questions about input gamma curves, I think Basiccolor uses a gamma that doesn't work with any resulting TIFF file produced from a raw processor program. Just a guess, though. Their site is pretty cryptic.

I tried to see that info myself, but can't find it. Could you post a link. BTW in my copy of basICColor Input even the Help is dead.

Meanwhile the result It8+simple scanner software, gives excellent results. I now have to wait for a new target that includes a standard reference file, to be able to feed it correctly to the other applications.

regards
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Czornyj
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« Reply #67 on: January 04, 2011, 06:26:34 AM »
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I've found something that might be interesting:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/dcp2icc/
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Marcin Kałuża
Nino Loss
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« Reply #68 on: January 04, 2011, 06:39:03 AM »
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I've found something that might be interesting:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/dcp2icc/
I didn't manage to make this work under Win7x64. Did you? Anyone?
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Czornyj
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« Reply #69 on: January 04, 2011, 09:21:59 AM »
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I didn't manage to make this work under Win7x64. Did you? Anyone?

You need to use command line interface to make it work - create a c:\dcp2icc folder, put the application, the library and some .dcp profile into the folder, then run cmd.exe, and in command line write: dcp2icc profilename.dcp 5000
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Marcin Kałuża
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« Reply #70 on: January 04, 2011, 09:26:33 AM »
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I didn't manage to make this work under Win7x64. Did you? Anyone?
Yes, i did. note however that the developer did not complete the code, and the resulting icc file is therefore not complete, but tools like gamutvision are able to read it and show the colorspace envelope. Gives interesting results, fi all nikon D700 dcp profiles (I own a D700), as well as adobe standard profile for instance (as provided with Lightroom) are in shape and size more or less like adobe rgb (the "Neutral" one obviously the most). However when creating a dcp with colorchecker passport or dng profile editor, it size and shape more resembles that of prophotorgb.
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Fine art photography: www.janrsmit.com
Courses and workshops: www.centrumbeeldbeleving.nl

Jan R. Smit
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