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Author Topic: Landscape Critique  (Read 2045 times)
Alan Klein
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« on: December 18, 2010, 11:28:03 PM »
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This is my first critique request.  I put together some old medium format landscape shots that I recently scanned.  Since I'm very close to retirement, I'm thinking about getting into this again after all this time and was hoping to get some inspiration and ideas where I could direct some of my energy to do better. Your comments and suggestions are very appreciated.  Thanks  Alan.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/sets/
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2010, 01:30:04 AM »
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Alan:  Rather than asking the members to sort through your entire photostream, you'd be best to post an image or two here for which you'd like critiques.  You'll get a better response that way.  You can post the links from Flickr if you like, just pick the image(s) for which you'd like comments.

Mike.
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2010, 02:19:01 AM »
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This is my first critique request.  I put together some old medium format landscape shots that I recently scanned.  Since I'm very close to retirement, I'm thinking about getting into this again after all this time and was hoping to get some inspiration and ideas where I could direct some of my energy to do better. Your comments and suggestions are very appreciated.  Thanks  Alan.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alanklein2000/sets/
Most of you landscapes are good, with good colour and composition... some of them might have benefited for better scanning or post-processing.

So many photographers do not use a good camera, and would not know how to use a good camera if they had one, or have not got what it takes to be in the right place at the right time to get a good landscape photograph.

I think that now is a great time to get into Medium format digital photography, new or second hand.
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stamper
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2010, 03:18:24 AM »
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Quote

So many photographers do not use a good camera, and would not know how to use a good camera if they had one, or have not got what it takes to be in the right place at the right time to get a good landscape photograph.

I think that now is a great time to get into Medium format digital photography, new or second hand.

Unquote

Would buying a Medium format camera make them a good photographer? It is just another tool. Huh
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2010, 03:40:14 AM »
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So many photographers do not use a good camera, and would not know how to use a good camera if they had one, or have not got what it takes to be in the right place at the right time to get a good landscape photograph.

I think that now is a great time to get into Medium format digital photography, new or second hand.

Would buying a Medium format camera make them a good photographer? It is just another tool. Huh
The implication in my post is that the OP is a good photographer who would make good use of, and get pleasure out of, a Medium Format Digital Camera.

If you had followed the link, you might have noticed that the OP already has a Medium Format camera.

You cannot take pictures without a camera, so it is the camera that makes a photographer... to what extent does a good camera make a good photographer?

Used with the right attitude and a little application and intelligence, digital cameras allow novices (and those doing complex work) to become better photographers more quickly than they could if they had to wait half a week to get feedback, but this is OT as the OP is no novice.
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stamper
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« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2010, 05:04:18 AM »
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The reason I quoted your post was it - IMHO - smacked of elitism. What I quoted didn't seem to be aimed at the OP, but at a certain section of the photographic world. Your assertion that it is the camera that makes the photographer won't be backed up by most posters, IMHO. An advanced camera will be an aid to a good photographer but a source of frustration to a novice. Most start with a point and shoot and migrate to a better one once they are confident of their abilities. A good camera is important but it - IMHO - won't teach you to be a good photographer? Cool Regarding the original post there is indeed some fine images there and I don't think the OP needs much guidance. He clearly knows what he is doing. Smiley
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2010, 06:11:20 AM »
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The reason I quoted your post was it - IMHO - smacked of elitism.
What is elitism? ¿knowing what quality is and how to get it?
... or producing good pictures and trying to get a good price for them?

What I was saying was that some photographers would not get much benefit from a good camera. In the days of film many successful photographers who could easily afford an MF system used 35mm... was that because
they liked grain?
they did not want to carry a heavy camera?
they thought a small camera was less obtrusive?

Quote
An advanced camera will be an aid to a good photographer but a source of frustration to a novice. Most start with a point and shoot and migrate to a better one once they are confident of their abilities. A good camera is important but it - IMHO - won't teach you to be a good photographer? Cool Regarding the original post there is indeed some fine images there and I don't think the OP needs much guidance. He clearly knows what he is doing. Smiley
Most of this is true, but now most advanced cameras can be used in fully automatic mode by novices.
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Alan Klein
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« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2010, 07:31:30 AM »
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Thank you all for your input. Mike was right that I should have just selected a couple of pictures that everyone could provide specific comments on rather than posting the set of landscapes for general comment.  I'll do that next time. One of the reasons I posted the set is because I'm insecure about my ability to do something decent and was looking for a couple of "atta boys".  The pictures are 15 years old and I'm trying to decide whether this amateur should spend the effort to get back into this thing with any seriousness.  I'll certainly have the time next year as I'm hoping to retire.

Dick, what would you suggest regarding scanning and PP where you see problems?  I have a V600 flat bed scanner and I'm using Elements 8 for PP (not using layers I have to admit).  I've experimented a lot in trying to learn but direct suggestions in your or anyone elses scanning and PP techniques would help.  If you could point out a specific shot where you could give specific suggestions, that would be great.
 
On a related question, I notice that my negatives seem to scan better than transparencies.  Also, I rather like the color in more neutral negatives (only in my Family set, but of course without people neutral is not as important.  My Landscape set pictures are either Velvia 50 chromes or Ektar 25 negatives.  The Family shots were mainly Fuji negative neutral saturation, don't recall which one off hand).  What film do you all use?
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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2010, 08:13:17 AM »
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Dick, what would you suggest regarding scanning and PP where you see problems?  I have a V600 flat bed scanner and I'm using Elements 8 for PP (not using layers I have to admit). 

On a related question, I notice that my negatives seem to scan better than transparencies.
I have not used film or a scanner for some time, and there are others here who could help you more, and, for example, tell you if your current scanner is up to getting the best out of your pictures.

The problems I see in your pictures are mostly in the shadows, and a good scanner expertly used can do amazing things with transparencies, but negative tend to have better dynamic range. The good, slow films you use are ideal for landscapes that do not have a very large dynamic range.

You are a good photographer... are you thinking of just amateur work or will you be selling prints?
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Alan Klein
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« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2010, 09:34:26 AM »
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Dick:  Yes, the shadows are hard to work with when you're scanning film.  I understand that's especially a problem with flat bed scanners.  It's even worse if you look at my Scuba shots.  Those were scanned from 35mm slides and the shadows really block up with the smaller format.  Some of the Landscape shots are cropped pretty tight so that accounts for some of the shadow problems in those too.   In reviewing all the pictures I scanned, the low saturation negative film seems to be really best if you're scanning.   I could always up the saturation in PP.

I'm thinking of using medium format film however going forward for now rather than digital.  Not because I get better pictures technically.  But because the medium format camera slows me down and forces me to think and compose better.

I haven't really thought about selling pictures.  Not that I would mind.  However, I don't think I'm good enough but you never know.  RIght now I'm still working in a "real" job.  Once I retire, (I planning to next summer),  I'll have time to think if I want to become a "Granda Moses" of photography.  Right now, I'm still hoping they don't screw up Social Security.

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Dick Roadnight
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« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2010, 11:13:28 AM »
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Dick:  Yes, the shadows are hard to work with when you're scanning film.  I understand that's especially a problem with flat bed scanners.  It's even worse if you look at my Scuba shots.  Those were scanned from 35mm slides and the shadows really block up with the smaller format.
I suggest you search the forum for "scanning", and if you do not find the specific info you need, start another topic.
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