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Author Topic: deleting test session/capturing & making back-up copy  (Read 1765 times)
Neil Folberg
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« on: December 19, 2010, 06:12:27 AM »
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Hello,

Question 1:
I've created various sessions which were just for testing parameters - now I want to delete them, along with the images. I can't find such a command in C1.

Does anyone know how to do it?

Question 2:
Working tethered with a Leaf back in C1, I can write the files directly to a hard disk. Can I also write an extra back-up file to a second disk at the same time, automatically, while shooting?

Many thanks,
Neil
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2010, 08:14:28 AM »
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1) Drag the specific session folder you want gone to your system trash -- everything associated with that session is in that folder.

2) Not within C1. I use a drive copy app to copy my main image folders to my external drives.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2010, 08:17:22 AM by Jack Flesher » Logged

Neil Folberg
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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2010, 09:43:27 AM »
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THANKS, Jack
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richardhagen
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« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2010, 01:43:37 PM »
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I use a drive copy app to copy my main image folders to my external drives.

jack, can you be more specific? cheers!

rh
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2010, 09:39:26 PM »
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jack, can you be more specific? cheers!

rh

I'm on a Mac, and there are a few good copy/clone apps.  Two popular ones are "Super Duper" and the one I use is "Carbon Copy Cloner."  In either, you schedule copy routines to run hourly, daily, weekly or monthly, and can copy at the folder or volume level. You can even make fully bootable copies of your complete OS using them.  

My personal set up for my images is a RAID-0 array inside my main machine copied to an onsite external RAID-0 array. (AKA RAID-0/1 or RAID-10.) Then I keep a third, simple back-up stored offsite to protect against a physical loss onsite.  By using RAID-0 inside my main computer for images, I give up some safety but gain very spiffy image reads and writes, which does save time.  Given that array is redundantly backed up onsite, I have my security against a R-0 failure.  (Note that with a RAID-0 image array, I have to assume I *will* loose it at some point, and hence the back-up arrays are mandatory.)

Cheers,  
« Last Edit: December 19, 2010, 09:41:37 PM by Jack Flesher » Logged

richardhagen
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« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2010, 12:16:21 AM »
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thanks for taking the time, jack!

rh

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