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Author Topic: DSLR images shot direct from above.  (Read 2417 times)
PrintedSpace
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« on: December 29, 2010, 04:01:03 AM »
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Hi all, Found this forum today and it looks like it's right up my street.
We print digital vinyl cushion flooring. My question is this:-
We need to shoot a series of natural flooring images, Sand, pebbles, cobbles, Snow, cracked mud, Tarmac, grass, water and the list goes on. Any ideas will be welcome of how this can be done. Obviously I have my ideas and thoughts but it would be good to get some fresh new ones.
One thing I forgot to say that is important the final artwork whether stitched or not needs to be a minimum of 13ft sq (4m) square.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2010, 10:39:44 AM by PrintedSpace » Logged
David McCaughan
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« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2010, 09:29:54 AM »
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When I shoot more than a few large rugs I build a platform out of 2x4s and plywood and tilt it a few degrees and use a large rolling metal ladder with a tripod strapped to it. How controlled a situation are you planning to work in?
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2010, 09:47:07 AM »
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How 'bout a couple ladders with a 2x12 between them? Or a Gitzo super tele studex with a cross arm?

What's the big deal? What am I missing?
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PrintedSpace
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« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2010, 10:25:35 AM »
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Hi David, The large rolling ladder idea sounds good. I plan to work with the seasons as we get a clear day start shooting in the spring, and keep it rolling through the year. I was thinking of investing in a video camera boom so it is easy enough to move around and get a series of shots than can be stitched. Thanks for the feed back.
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PrintedSpace
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« Reply #4 on: December 29, 2010, 10:28:15 AM »
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Hi Chris, I'm just about to have a look at the Gitzo super tele studex with a cross arm, excuse lac of experience shooting location work. I'll come back to you when I've taken a look.
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PrintedSpace
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« Reply #5 on: December 29, 2010, 11:04:29 AM »
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Hi Chris, Checked out the Gitzo super tele studex, looks like its been dropped as a product on there site. I get the idea though and understand were your coming from. Any more say 9ft high level rigs will be more than welcome. Like the "bout a couple ladders with a 2x12 between them"? comment, It would actually work well in some cases. Not sure I would want to carry them far though. Smiley
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #6 on: December 29, 2010, 05:12:09 PM »
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Hi Chris, Checked out the Gitzo super tele studex, looks like its been dropped as a product on there site. I get the idea though and understand were your coming from. Any more say 9ft high level rigs will be more than welcome.

Bummer 'bout the product changes.

How 'bout this Gitzo, with this center column and this side arm?
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2010, 06:52:10 PM »
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Hi David, The large rolling ladder idea sounds good. I plan to work with the seasons as we get a clear day start shooting in the spring, and keep it rolling through the year. I was thinking of investing in a video camera boom so it is easy enough to move around and get a series of shots than can be stitched.

Yes, it's similar to what I wanted to suggest. Some stitching programs specifically allow to assemble images of flat objects taken from different locations (e.g. PTAssembler for Windows, the Camera Position Optimizer in the Beta version). It relaxes the requirements for plan-parallel shooting tremendously (as long as the image plane is within the Depth of field), and thus allows faster aquisition.

Cheers,
Bart
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ronkruger
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2010, 11:45:57 PM »
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You didn't mention equipment. Presuming digital, I'd want MF for maximum resolution and detail and a wide-angle lens. The wider you go (without distortion or bending) the less you will have to elevate it.
This, by the way, sounds like a great marketing idea for flooring.
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In the end, the only things that matter are the people we help and the people we hurt. Google Ron Kruger and click on any link to Photoshelter
PrintedSpace
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« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2010, 04:26:40 AM »
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Hi Ron, Great someone that gets the concept, I'm glad you like the idea. I have been looking at MF & DMF, I was thinking off shooting of somthing like. This http://www.google.co.uk/m/search?site=images&gl=uk&client=safari&source=mog&hl=en&aq=f&oq=&aqi=g1-k0d0t0&fkt=893&fsdt=4085&q=video+boom#i=4  Let's chat so more about the concept.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2010, 07:19:53 AM by PrintedSpace » Logged
PrintedSpace
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« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2010, 05:49:17 AM »
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Or this http://www.b-hague.co.uk/hague_hdv_boom_k8.htm
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ronkruger
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« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2010, 09:31:52 AM »
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If you use a WA lens, you won't have to get as high, but you will have to extend it quite a bit to avoid getting the boom itself in the shot, so I would think the Hague would be best. Looks very solid too. A DMF will give you maximum resolution, and having a WA lens allows you to get closer to the subject for even better control over lighting and more detail. I would flood the area with external lighting, even when shooting outdoors, use the lowest ISO possible and trigger the camera with a remote for mirror-up function.
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In the end, the only things that matter are the people we help and the people we hurt. Google Ron Kruger and click on any link to Photoshelter
ronkruger
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« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2010, 09:54:57 AM »
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I'm excited by your idea and think it will have a strong appeal to high-end users. You might also consider shooting a clear flowing stream for people to install in their hallways. I can images a shutter speed that would show movement, yet retain details of streambed rocks and slower water. How cool would that be?
No matter what you use or where you use it, photography is all about the light, and having shot quite a bit outdoors, I suggest you flood the area with strong lighting from at least two sides to avoid shadows. Even with the sun directly overhead, you're going to get shadows from ambiant light.
If you shoot water, however, you'll also need a good CPL to avoid hot spots and flair.
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In the end, the only things that matter are the people we help and the people we hurt. Google Ron Kruger and click on any link to Photoshelter
Chris_Brown
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« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2010, 10:25:01 AM »
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Booms don't lock down firmly. If you have to touch the camera, then there will be slight movement & change to the camera's position. If that's not a concern, and you want to shoot video, then go for it.
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PrintedSpace
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« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2010, 02:18:37 PM »
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Hi Ron, Sounds like you know what your doing, why don't you send me a mail. We may be able to get somthing going?
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PrintedSpace
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« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2010, 02:22:08 PM »
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Also like the idea of running streams. Let's see what we can do Smiley
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