Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Calibration / Dell U2410  (Read 24338 times)
rc456456
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« on: January 08, 2011, 05:26:50 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi,  I recently got a new Dell U2410 wide gamut monitor.  Although it came calibrated from the factory I could not find a color preset that looked realistic.  The monitor has a number of presets icluding standard, Adobe rgb, srgb (elumated srgb) games, etc.  The monitor seemed to have an odd color cast, especially when editing gray scale images.

I calibrated it with my eye-one display 2 and everything looked much better afterward when using a color managed program such as PS or LR.

My question is, does it matter what preset mode the monitor is in when I calibrate it.  I assume, but am not at all certain, that if I calibrated it in standard mode the colors will relate to the recent calibration as long as I keep the monitor in standard mode. 

There was very little documentation that came with the monitor and not much on Dell's website.  I am confused and would appreciate any help.

Thanks.   
Logged
TKTeo
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2011, 12:05:02 PM »
ReplyReply

I set the U2410 to the Custom Color preset mode before calibrating it with the i1Display 2.

I don't know how to explain why Custom is the "correct" color preset for calibration, though. Sorry.
Logged
fike
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1372


Hiker Photographer


WWW
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2011, 02:52:12 PM »
ReplyReply

I have a U2410 and I am quite satisfied. Here is a thread we had about its performance and calibration.
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=40068.0;topicseen

Here is a review that talks about the presets and makes suggestions about where you should start when calibrating:
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/content/dell_u2410.htm

My sense is that it really doesn't matter too much which one you pick if you are able to get it within the bounds specified by the Eye1 software, just don't change it.  I think they recommended calibrating from the custom settings though because you could use RGB controls to normalize the neutral gray before the software begins the calibration.

There is probably much more discussion on this topic in the color management forum.
Logged

Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
TeeKay
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2012, 05:59:31 AM »
ReplyReply

I realise this is an old topic but it pops up in a Google search and therefore deserves some further info.

The "Custom" mode is to be avoided at all cost. The U2410 has a non-linear behaviour in that mode (the Asus PA246Q has the same problem).

One can use the "sRGB" mode but then one loses the wide-gamut property of the monitor, i.e., one wastes all the colours outside the (relatively small) sRGB space.

Good modes are the "Standard" mode and the "Adobe RGB" mode. In terms of gamut they are very comparable. The "Adobe RGB" mode has the advantage of a native gamma that is much closer to the typical target gamma of 2.2. If you are using the monitor for softproofing prints with a gamma of 1.8 then the "Standard" mode is your friend.

Calibration can get both modes to reach gamma 2.2 but when you do this starting with the "Standard" mode, you lose a bit more tonal values which may result in visible banding.

As the U2410 is a wide-gamut display, colorimeters are not suitable for hardware calibration, unless their software allows compensation for wide gamut displays. Spectrophotometer work straight away, but aren't as good at low luminance values. Apparently the golden path is to use both types of calibration devices...
Logged
mhk1058
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2012, 12:58:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Custom mode to be avoided at all costs? If you want to calibrate the monitor properly this is the only one that you can do it with as this is the only mode where you have access to the 6 color channels. Standard mode is just for general use - no use for accurate color work. If you don't have a calibration device, use the factory calibrated Adobe RGB mode.

The old X-Rite eye 1 Display 2 is no good for wide gamut monitors - the new Display Pro and ColorMunki Display are very good for wide gamut monitors.
Logged
TeeKay
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2012, 12:32:32 AM »
ReplyReply

Custom mode to be avoided at all costs?
A 100% "yes" to that.

If you want to calibrate the monitor properly this is the only one that you can do it with as this is the only mode where you have access to the 6 color channels.
1. If you are using a hardware calibrator, you do not need to adjust the 6 color channels manually. You may optimise the number of shades by doing so prior to hardware calibration but only the most advanced users would go there.

2. The DELL 2410's custom mode is broken. If you use it with anything but the default settings, your colours will be off. Period. Please do educate yourself on the matter, before misinforming other people.

Standard mode is just for general use - no use for accurate color work. If you don't have a calibration device, use the factory calibrated Adobe RGB mode.
The Standard mode is definitely not "for general use". Without calibration, it won't be useful with its wide gamut and non-standard gamma of 1.8. It is a good mode to use a hardware calibrator with, if you are intending to edit for printing.

The old X-Rite eye 1 Display 2 is no good for wide gamut monitors - the new Display Pro and ColorMunki Display are very good for wide gamut monitors.
What matters is the type. Spectrophotometers work with wide gamut displays like the U2410. Colorimeters do not unless you have access to a spectrophotometer to produce a correction matrix for your colorimeter copy and have the software that allows you to use such a correction matrix.
Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8108



WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 08:36:14 AM »
ReplyReply

What matters is the type. Spectrophotometers work with wide gamut displays like the U2410. Colorimeters do not unless you have access to a spectrophotometer to produce a correction matrix for your colorimeter copy and have the software that allows you to use such a correction matrix.

And without the proper matrix, one could probably get desired results (assuming the desired result is some match to a print or another display) by futzing around with differing white point settings, provided the software has adequate controls to do so. If you were forced into a few CCT values or Standard Illuminant settings, that would be very difficult or impossible to do. With custom CCT or x/y values, you should be able to get there.   
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
fike
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1372


Hiker Photographer


WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2012, 04:08:43 PM »
ReplyReply

I realise this is an old topic but it pops up in a Google search and therefore deserves some further info.

The "Custom" mode is to be avoided at all cost. The U2410 has a non-linear behaviour in that mode (the Asus PA246Q has the same problem).

I am disinclined to give this opinion any credence without some further substantiation.  Two people with very few forum posts and no profile information have come out strongly saying not to use custom mode.  Does anyone else know where this comes from?
Logged

Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
velja
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2



WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2012, 09:53:07 AM »
ReplyReply

I have this monitor, and have no means of getting my hands on a colorimeter anytime soon. I gather that best option in my situation is just to use the AdobeRGB preset.
But what ICC profile do i use with it ? AdobeRGB ?
I have the Dell ICC profile that came with the monitor, but i guess it is made for the "standard" preset.
Logged
deejjjaaaa
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 743


« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2012, 01:47:28 PM »
ReplyReply

I have this monitor, and have no means of getting my hands on a colorimeter anytime soon. I gather that best option in my situation is just to use the AdobeRGB preset.
But what ICC profile do i use with it ? AdobeRGB ?
I have the Dell ICC profile that came with the monitor, but i guess it is made for the "standard" preset.

1) you can borrow/rent a device locally from somebody

2) you can use factory defaults and OEM display profile

3) you can try to download profiles created by somebody else = http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/icc_profiles.htm#d
Logged
velja
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2



WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2012, 07:15:26 PM »
ReplyReply

For the moment, I would go with option number 2. This is what confuses me :
There are few presets on my monitor but only one ICC profile came on the disc. This profile can't be right for all of the presets and i'm guessing it corresponds to "standard" preset on the monitor. According to tftcentral, best preset to chose out of the box is the "AdobeRGB" (smallest deltaE or something). Does that mean i need to set my windows monitor profile to AdobeRGB(1998).ICC profile to use with that preset ?
Logged
kaelaria
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2184



WWW
« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2012, 11:40:38 PM »
ReplyReply

Wow lots of BS in this thread.  I've been using a 2410 for years and it's always been dead nuts on using my i1D2.  Nothing special needed.
Logged

DLpres
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2012, 04:51:41 PM »
ReplyReply

I am disinclined to give this opinion any credence without some further substantiation.  Two people with very few forum posts and no profile information have come out strongly saying not to use custom mode.  Does anyone else know where this comes from?

http://www.prad.de/en/monitore/review/2010/review-dell-u2410.html
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/dell_u2410.htm


I'm responsible for maintaining over a dozen U2410's at my company. As confusing as color management gets, there are two points of consensus:
- If you have a U2410, avoid the custom mode.
- The i1 Display Pro (aka i1D3) is the most accurate probe in its class compared to anything that came before it (such as the i1D2).

If you don't believe others, go measure it yourself. That's the beauty of science...

To work around the Custom mode problem:
1. Pick your preset (sRGB/Standard/Adobe 1998), and profile it.
2. Access the factory menu (Google to find how)
3. Write down the RGB values for the preset you picked
4. Use the factory menu controls to calibrate instead of Custom mode
5. Profile again
6. Compare the results, and go with whichever approach is more accurate (lower deltaE's).
 
Logged
dbvieira
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2013, 05:28:09 PM »
ReplyReply

I own two U2410s

Lately and I dont know why whenever i calibrate them with eye-one display 2 I get disappointing results, ie a bluisch cast and washed colors. Being aRGB the closest.

Im using ICC4 and large LUT (dont see diffence from the default) and choose advanced  mode for LCD targeting to 6.5K and I end with a bluish image (aRGB reads as 3900K). calibration done at night.

I had already calibrated this monitor before. I noticed everytime i calibrate the monitors something changed even after 5 min. But now is worse.

Do the colorimeter got "worn"? Does any one got a clue?

Regards

David
Logged
DLpres
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2013, 12:45:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Something else I noticed is how much the backlight drifts... Basically keep the probe in continuous measurement mode (like dispcalGUI's calibration step), make a brightness adjustment in the U2410, and watch as the readout keeps changing for many minutes, by as much as 1 cd/m2 per minute.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad