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Author Topic: Changing approach to fit the client - architecture & interiors  (Read 1726 times)
OwenR
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« on: January 10, 2011, 01:04:57 AM »
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I'm curious to hear from the architectural/interior photographers here how you change your approach according to the needs of your client, specifically, in changing the mood and tone between straight 'design' images for architects and interior designers, and a more lifestyle lead requirement for hotel chains, clubs and restaurants.

The vast majority of my clients are designers and are looking for precise images that show clearly their intent and the space in the best possible way. In in a way, this can be very much 'right brain' photography. Hotel chains, on the other hand, often want this approach for much of the set, but also a more evocative, mood led set that communicates the level of service and pampering that they offer. Sometimes, the design is also not really strong enough to focus on purely, or the place is not in perfect condition after a few years of heavy use (restaurants and bars can often be like this).

I'd love to hear how people change their approach and/or style in order to fit the different requirements. For my part, it often involves lighting the rooms in pools of warm light, and focusing more on the little details rather than creating technically perfect architectural shots.

Cheers,
Owen
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 08:44:41 PM by OwenR » Logged
OwenR
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2011, 08:40:54 PM »
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Agreed, any shoot should always start with a detailed discussion with the client, it informs whatever may come next. Adapting to the client and the project is the most rewarding thing for me in photography.

As you often photograph for hotels (and rather well, too), your images show a sense of what it's like to stay in that hotel. They're well propped, wonderfully lit. Often straight architectural shoots - and I shoot predominantly commercial interiors - are successful based on how well they pick out details in design (specific wall coverings, fabrics, textures, how the space is used), have perfectly balanced light to reveal the whole space, and have very tight leading lines. They're very technical, and this is a mindset that many generalist photographers sometimes miss out on. Hospitality photography, whilst it shows the room and has exceptionally high production values, often aims to show something a bit different, but using the same physical space. It's this well propped, evocative style which an architectural photographer has to take on board and which, if you spend a huge part of your life looking for precision, can require a change in mindset.

Another way to show this is in the differences between photographing a high-end office and a rustic home. One is focused on the structure and materiality of the room, the other on the small things there that give it its uniqueness.

Same skills, different approaches. How do people change their approach? Lighting (natural and added), props, stylists, time frame, use of people in the shots, tighter compositions, unusual angles...?
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JoeKitchen
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« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2011, 09:18:03 AM »
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I feel it has to come down to focus, which is something I sell to my clients.  I tell them that I want to focus on what is important to them and want to hear what they feel is important, or what they need to show to their prospects.  And then I build my images around those items.  I do not look at it as a change in style, but a change in focus with the same style. 
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Joe Kitchen
www.josephmkitchen.com

"Photography is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent moving furniture."  Arnold Newman
"Try not to be just better than your rivals and contemporaries, try to be better than yourself."  William Faulkner
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