Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: custom profiles 1dmII  (Read 960 times)
Jonathan Wienke
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5759



WWW
« on: February 27, 2005, 08:32:27 AM »
ReplyReply

In regards to camera profiling, read Adobe Camera RAW Calibration. If you want to use a custom profile, shooting RAW is mandatory.

Canon has 3 tilt-shift lenses that allow movements similar to a 4x5 camera in 24, 25, and 90mm focal lengths. Unless you plan on consistently printing larger than 24x36, I would recommend skipping LF film and get the 1Ds-MkII. If you don't anticipate printing larger than 16x24, then get the 1D-MkII (with its 8FPS frame rate and 20-frame buffer) and use the extra money for glass. You may want to consider both, since by the time you get a LF camera, lenses and accessories, and a decent scanner, you could end up spending nearly the price of a 1Ds-MkII, and then you have the dollars-per-frame cost for film and processing plus the time and effort it takes to scan the film. If you plan on shooting very much, it won't take long for shooting LF to cost you more than the 1Ds-MkII.

If buying both bodies is financially unacceptable, decide which is more important, and choose your body accordingly.
Logged

Jonathan Wienke
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5759



WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2005, 04:21:07 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Having never used movements before, it may be easier to learn on a (cheap) LF camera.
LF is only cheap until you start shooting. For what you're contemplating, your best bet would be to shoot tethered to a laptop, so that the image comes up on the laptop screen after shooting. At that point, you can know if you've gotten your lines straight, and zoom in to check focus if you want. Regarding movement ranges, I've never shot LF, so I'll defer that question to someone with actual experience.
Logged

ozmatt
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2005, 03:57:29 AM »
ReplyReply

G'day all,

I'm new to digital. Actually I'm not fully there yet. I shoot landscapes with EOS film gear. I'm reasonably competent with Photoshop, to the extent of cleaning up and working with scans.

Now, with all the hype surrounding digital the following may sound strange. I plan to invest in both a LF setup as well as migrating to EOS digital. The LF part of the equation is for another thread, but I do have a question regarding digital.

I'm looking at the ID mark II. I would love a 1Ds mark II but simply out of my price range. Another reason for the ID mark II is that i want to get into wildlife photography too (fast frame rate).  In Micheal's review of the 1D mark II he commented unfavourably about the mark II's colour rendition, but that this can be fixed by a custom profile.

What exactly is a custom profile, and how does one go about making one?

If I shoot RAW, can such a problem be fixed during conversion instead? But that still leaves JPEG when fast frame rates are called for...

One final question: put your hands up if you think i should skip investment in a LF setup and put the extra money straight into a 1Ds mark II??? The main reason I'm going for LF too is for movements (i'll be shooting architecture as well).

Thanks for your time  

Matt ::
Logged
ozmatt
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5


« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2005, 09:45:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for the link, just what I was after. I'll keep it stored until the time comes...

As for 35mm PC lenses, how easy is it to see the effects of tilt/shift through a small finder? Having never used movements before, it may be easier to learn on a (cheap) LF camera. Also, how much movement do you actually get comapred to a LF camera? Is it suitable for most general applications? I mean, for landscapes i'm sure they'll be fine as often what is needed is just a little tilt, but i hear architecture requires a heap of movement at times.

cheers,

Matt
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad