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Author Topic: Cabrillo  (Read 2513 times)
jule
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« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2011, 07:18:30 PM »
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Julie, I don't think Andres or anyone else can find a "middle ground." Either you're shooting for a client, in which case his opinion of the work is all that matters, or you're shooting for yourself, in which case what anyone else thinks about it is nothing compared with its impact on you. I think Elliott Erwitt had the right idea. He'd go on a shoot for a client that put food on his table, but when he'd finished the day's grunt work he started shooting for himself. The finest part of his work is what he did for himself -- what he called "personal best." He once said something to the effect that he'd always been an amateur. Someone asked him how that could be since he made his living that way. He said, I love what I do. That's what amateur means.
Yep, well said Russ. the bottom line is that you're either are influenced by others to opinions and adjust your work accordingly or you're not. If you choose to earn your bread and butter from your photography for the masses of opinion, there is no point in just producing images which don't sell.

It may also be said that there are those who earn their bread and butter and fame from their images and don't give two hoots about catering to others opinions - these of whom I'm pretty sure are in much smaller numbers.

Everyone makes choices about where they stand according to one's own priorities, but from my expereince, and as you have illustrated above using Elliot Erwitt as an example, there is something more powerful, strong, fine, authentic... about work which has come from an artist whose expression is done for oneself and has not been moulded or altered to cater to 'the middle ground' of opinion.

Julie

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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #21 on: January 22, 2011, 11:22:53 AM »
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Julie, I don't think Andres or anyone else can find a "middle ground." Either you're shooting for a client, in which case his opinion of the work is all that matters, or you're shooting for yourself, in which case what anyone else thinks about it is nothing compared with its impact on you. I think Elliott Erwitt had the right idea. He'd go on a shoot for a client that put food on his table, but when he'd finished the day's grunt work he started shooting for himself. The finest part of his work is what he did for himself -- what he called "personal best." He once said something to the effect that he'd always been an amateur. Someone asked him how that could be since he made his living that way. He said, I love what I do. That's what amateur means.

Russ it is always a pleasure to read your posts since they have great references on photography and influential artits.
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Andres Bonilla
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« Reply #22 on: January 22, 2011, 11:50:15 AM »
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Yep, well said Russ. the bottom line is that you're either are influenced by others to opinions and adjust your work accordingly or you're not. If you choose to earn your bread and butter from your photography for the masses of opinion, there is no point in just producing images which don't sell.

It may also be said that there are those who earn their bread and butter and fame from their images and don't give two hoots about catering to others opinions - these of whom I'm pretty sure are in much smaller numbers.

Everyone makes choices about where they stand according to one's own priorities, but from my expereince, and as you have illustrated above using Elliot Erwitt as an example, there is something more powerful, strong, fine, authentic... about work which has come from an artist whose expression is done for oneself and has not been moulded or altered to cater to 'the middle ground' of opinion.

Julie



Julie I think I am able to find a “middle ground maybe” (Which seems to be the part you are stuck on) on the saturation of the photo, which seems to be the debatable point, without changing the essence and purpose of the photo. By now, having posted the photo on several forums, the picture has had several thousands hits and close to a hundred comments; most of them favorable or at least curious about the style. Yes, I had a gentleman telling me I went for the easy route with the lovely sunset and I should have done it the opposite direction and in black and white. Curiously, he also used the terms authentic and strong with courageous, as he referred to his version. Doing half of his suggestions with maybe a little of my initial post would have definitively be a compromise or “middle ground maybe” but backing of a tad the saturation hardly qualifies as a sell out or an unauthentic compromise with the initial work.

The great Fernando Botero got crushed in Italy when he first came out with his paintings of obese people, he did not change a thing ….except he moved away a bit from Colombian themes and made his paintings more universal; now he is one of the most recognizable painter in the world. Now he paints what he wants including many Colombian scenarios and nobody can call him unauthentic or weak. That would be naive.


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