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Author Topic: Experience with Canson Rag Photographique 310gsm paper?  (Read 6499 times)
jule
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« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2011, 04:46:37 PM »
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I used to be a fan of Hahnemuhle Photo rag until I noticed variations in colour between different roll sizes and different batches of paper. I have found there is even a very distinct difference in colour results after printing between the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag rolls and the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Duo sheets, and have consequently had profiles made for the Duo sheets - even though to the best of my knowledge it is supposed to be the same coating as "Photo Rag" . Perhaps different mills and 'factories' are producing slightly different coatings even with the same 'recipe'.

I have custom profiles made by Les Walking and it was infuriating changing rolls and finding that the prints had variations in tonality or colour.... just marginally... but quite distinct and totally unacceptable when producing the work I make.

I then out of desperation tried Canson Rag Photographic and found it to be an absolutely beautiful paper - although a tad too smooth for my own preference, since I quite liked the tooth of the Hahnemuhle Photo Rag. Choosing the compromise between having a texture which wasn't totally what I wanted , and having slight differences in colour between rolls was a no brainer for me...and I went the consistancy route.

I haven't tried the Arches Vellum Museum Rag, but am using the Canson BFK Rives for some artist books, and this paper has a lovely feel when held and quite a beautiful texture which I like. I am experimenting with using this paper instead of Canso Rag Photographique for my next body of work, looking at the landscape and geology - where the texture of the paper I think may contribute to the overall 'feel' of the image and what I want to create.

I would suggest though whenever choosing a paper, I firslty hold it in my hand to determine its' physical characteristics. I then would look at the technical data and specs to see the DMax etc.... then I would get a profile made. I wouldn't wste any ink printing images before then because unless you work out how to get the best out of the paper by using a custom profile, you really can't determine the potential of the paper. Once the profile is made, I would test a couple of images using a couple of different papers and get someeone else to put them up on the wall so initally I don't know which is which.... sort of like a blind trial with my eyes open... (LOL - bad pun I know)... Then over a couple of days work out which image has the best 'presence'.... and that would be the paper i would go with for that particular style of image or body of work.

Julie
« Last Edit: January 29, 2011, 04:49:05 PM by jule » Logged

Brian Gilkes
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« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2011, 02:03:01 PM »
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Arches Velin and BFK Rives are very similar papers, same coatings, both mould made , both very good but slightly less gamut and DMax than the metal machine made and smoother Rag Photographique. If you need more texture there is Arches Aquarelle, which prints text and detail very sharply. I am currently using it for some book projects. Again this paper is mould-made.
As far as the hoary gloss versus matte debate, gloss blacks do indeed "pop", bur a good matte black has a mysterious depth. Gloss colours shine in the highlights, matte colours in shadows can be rich, like old tapestry. The opinions of others will no doubt differ. 
Cheers
Brian
www.pharoseditions.com.au
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2011, 02:22:19 PM »
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Quote
gloss blacks do indeed "pop", bur a good matte black has a mysterious depth. Gloss colours shine in the highlights, matte colours in shadows can be rich, like old tapestry. The opinions of others will no doubt differ.

Agreed on all counts. This morning the client and I discussed this as they had made  basic proofs on semi-gloss paper. Fortunately they understand the difference. As my long ago  British ex-girlfriend used to say "it's horses for courses" and Canson Rag Photographique 310 is proving to be basically the best horse for this suite of 21 images of a California vineyard and ranch. 
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
deanwork
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« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2011, 05:51:00 PM »
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I've been using the Canson Rag Photograhique in rolls for some time. My opinion is that it is by far the best smooth matte rag paper that I've ever used, and I've pretty much used them all. It produces awesome quality on the HPZ printers, especially with black and white neutral prints. I find it also a bit sharper than Photorag 308 and uses pigment whiteners not oba dyes. I just had a large print on it go up in a museum in New Orleans and everyone was raving about it. The Canson Edition Etching is my favorite etching surface media now as well. The Cason Montval Aquarelle Rag is my favorite significantly textured rag paper and is just unbelievably gorgeous with warm toned monochrome especially. It also doesn't scuff like William Turner's toothy delicate surface and I like the texture weave better.

I recently bought a roll of the Innova Soft Texture a couple of weeks ago, that used to be a pretty good paper for its price ( also an etching surface) and I was shocked at how horrible the coating was on this roll. It was uneven and blotchy all over and it curled so badly I could hardly use it. I guess you get what you pay for these days. And with the Canson you pay a lot. But what are you gonna do? Once you get addicted to it you can't stop using it.

Canson has been around since the 16th century and has always made some of the finest drawing papers every made.

john
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