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Author Topic: High Impact Paper for Color  (Read 4516 times)
Nino Loss
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« on: January 28, 2011, 07:09:40 AM »
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An unusual question for this forum:

For an exhibition I am looking for a paper which does not have to be archival! It does not matter, if it is or not. What does matter, is the overall impression: It should have the maximum possible impact. They´ll be color portraits 16x20 and 50x70 with or without glass, coated or uncoated, only impact counts.

I was thinking of Exhibition Fiber (Tradition Photo Paper), but there must be better papers out there. I am thinking of something like Canson Infinity Photo HighGloss Premium RC Paper (315 gsm), but I never tried it. Has anyone here used it? Maybe you have some other suggestions.

kind regards
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2011, 08:40:06 AM »
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Before I got to the last paragraph I was going to suggest Epson Exhibition Fiber and/or HFA Fine Art Baryta.
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Randy Carone
terrywyse
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« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2011, 08:49:00 AM »
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I'm working with 3 papers right now that all have some of the largest color gamuts I've tested...

* Epson Exhibition Fiber
* Ilford Gold Fiber Silk
* Canson Infinity Baryta Photographique

As far as "impact", the Ilford and Canson paper have the best paper white L* (97-98) while the Exhibition Fiber has a slightly better Dmax (L* 3-4). In terms of actual "dynamic range", the Ilford and Canson papers have the slight edge owing to their higher paper white L*....but they're all pretty damn close.

Both the Ilford and Canson are relatively neutral with a very minimal about of OBAs/FWAs while the Exhibition Fiber is quite blue and has a fair amount of FWAs.

Terry
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Terry Wyse, WyseConsul
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Sven W
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« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2011, 08:50:09 AM »
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You should look for Largest Gamut Volume for a certain printer/paper combo.
But there are different ways how to define that.

Maybe Pictorico Pro Hi-Gloss White Film or Ilford Smooth High Gloss Media. Probably not in the sizes you want.
And the Canson you mention is a killer, when talking about Dmax. It's the peak on Dane Creeks list with 2.46

/Sven
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neile
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« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2011, 09:54:28 AM »
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I was going to suggest something like the High Gloss White from Pictorico as well (just off the top of my head, no numbers to back that up), but if it's impact you're after you may want to look at the metallic paper options out there now as well. Maybe not as dynamic range as other papers, but the metallic look is definitely eye-catching when used with the right images.

Reviews at http://www.danecreekfolios.com/blog/2010/7/9/metallic-inkjet-paper-review-part-2-proofline-photo-chrome-a.html.

Neil
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Neil Enns
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Ramonn
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« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2011, 02:15:40 PM »
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While in New York this past summer I checked out papers at B and H. The sample photos printed on various Canson papers included a bird printed on a paper, that to my eye, stood out from the rest. The Canson paper was the one you mention.

Another alternative might be a luster paper. I am very interested in images with bold colors that in a way are almost primitive. Check out Pete Turner images to see what I mean. According to a few on line interviews, at one point, he was using Epsion Premium Luster paper.

http://www.peteturner.com/

http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/jsp/Pro/FocalPoints/Story/EmpoweredbyColor.do?BV_UseBVCookie=yes
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Gemmtech
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« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2011, 02:20:08 PM »
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How about a dye printer with Pictorico Pro High Gloss White Film?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=pictorico+pro+hi-gloss&N=0&InitialSearch=yes
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jdoyle1713
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« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2011, 01:38:20 PM »
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Just a quick answer..Before you go and buy samples.. You need to understand what papers come in 60" rolls and also what printer you are printing on..

Why look at material that doesnt fit the bill.. Canson doesnt have 60" material..and your question said a 50x70 print..

Cheers
Jim Doyle
www.shadesofpaper.com Wink
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2011, 01:43:46 PM »
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Canson doesnt have 60" material..and your question said a 50x70 print..

Oh thanks for that one! I completely forgot to check that. I have to check my options! Ilford does do 60" I guess...
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jdoyle1713
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« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2011, 02:23:06 PM »
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Ilford Silk comes in 50"
Hahnemuhle Fine Art & Photo Rag Baryta 60"
Epson Exhibition Fiber 64"
Innova Ultrasmooth Gloss,Warmtone & Semimatte 60"

Many Luster,Gloss,semi gloss & Matte

what printer.. Epson 11990 thats a 64" machine or Canon 9100 Thats a 60"
If using some other machine there may be an otion as well

Cheers
Jim Doyle
http://www.shadesofpaper.com Shocked
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2011, 02:24:36 PM »
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epson 3880 and 9900
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Sven W
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« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2011, 03:49:02 PM »
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epson 3880 and 9900

But you was talking about 50x70 prints Huh

/Sven
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2011, 04:49:33 PM »
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But you was talking about 50x70 prints Huh

/Sven


You are right, sorry, for the bigger ones, I give them to friend with a 11880. But, while I'm at it, I would like to get it for all combinations. The x880s should produce quite similar results, right?
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ftbt
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« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2011, 04:59:48 PM »
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I just tried some LexJet Sunset Photo Metallic on my Canon 8300, using LexJet's profiles. All I can say is WOW! I just printed some HDR's of some Italian vineyards I took during the harvest several months ago. The colors sure do pop.
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VitOne
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« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2011, 06:45:07 PM »
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What kind of light source will be used to show the prints? If you are using the "right" light a glossy paper could also be used. If the light in the ambient where you are going to show the prints is not uniform a glossy, luster and also a baryta paper could not be the right solution.
Do you belive me if I say to you that the paper the had the "wow" effect in my last display was the Hahnemuhle Bamboo paper (a matte paper)? The ambient was not very well illuminated and the light source where some lamps "shoot against the prints". There where also some big prints made with FA Baryta and GlossBaryta (by Harman) but looking at them was not a nice experience because of all the reflections.
Of coruse if you have the possibility to controll and check the light an high-gamut high-gloss paper could be a nice solution. It also depends on who you want to impress...
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Rob Reiter
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« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2011, 10:31:28 PM »
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I assume you're talking about printing on an inkjet printer, but if you don't find something with suitable impact, consider a LightJet or Chromira print on Fuji Crystal Archive Super Glossy. A mirror-like finish and higher color saturation than anything made for inkjet printing.
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Sven W
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« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2011, 04:52:23 AM »
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I assume you're talking about printing on an inkjet printer, but if you don't find something with suitable impact, consider a LightJet or Chromira print on Fuji Crystal Archive Super Glossy. A mirror-like finish and higher color saturation than anything made for inkjet printing.

Then you haven't seen any inkjet prints the last couple of years.
Both Epson Canon and HP produce prints on certain papers, with saturation which you never can achieve with the RA4 process.

Epson 9900/Harman Gloss to the left and LightJet to the right
« Last Edit: January 30, 2011, 04:53:56 AM by Sven W » Logged

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Gemmtech
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« Reply #17 on: January 30, 2011, 11:39:48 AM »
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However, let's not forget that pigment ink on glossy papers doesn't look very good.  Though the one print I have from a Canon 6350 is good, but no dye ink comparison


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Rob Reiter
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« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2011, 12:38:55 PM »
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Nino's quest was for a paper with maximum impact-not exactly quantifiable in laboratory measurements. Do your numbers for the LightJet come from the Super Glossy finish? You don't make that clear. While I'm not generally a fan of LightJet printing, I'll give credit where credit is due. I print on Harman glossy paper myself and refer it, generally, but it's semi-glossy finish has nowhere near the impact that the Super Glossy Fuji material has, so if 'impact' is the primary consideration, I still suggest that as an alternative Nino should consider if there is no requirement to stick with an inkjet print.


Then you haven't seen any inkjet prints the last couple of years.
Both Epson Canon and HP produce prints on certain papers, with saturation which you never can achieve with the RA4 process.

Epson 9900/Harman Gloss to the left and LightJet to the right
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2011, 02:58:14 PM »
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No, there is no limitation to ink jet. Obviously, "high impact" is subjective, but everybody seems to get what is meant, namely high dMax, gamut ...

I did consider the traditional Fuji solutions (As I would have to use and pay someone else's 11880 machine for the 50x70 prints, it would also be, in my particular situation, substantially cheaper to go the Fuji-Crystal-Archive-Super-Glossy way). The prints, as far as I can tell, do not compete anymore with the best of ink-jet printing, but maybe I'm wrong and somebody can show figures.

Regarding dye ink, I don't remember having seen a large format dye ink photo print.

regards
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