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Author Topic: High Impact Paper for Color  (Read 4358 times)
Sven W
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« Reply #20 on: January 30, 2011, 03:57:00 PM »
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Nino's quest was for a paper with maximum impact-not exactly quantifiable in laboratory measurements. Do your numbers for the LightJet come from the Super Glossy finish? You don't make that clear.

I was talking about highest possible saturation, not "highest impact".
A Diasec or facemounted print (inkjet or RA4) is what I call an "impact".

The measurement comes from Fuji Crystal Archive Glossy, but according the LightJet printmaker, the saturation is equal to
Super Glossy.

/Sven
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Stockholm, Sweden
jdoyle1713
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« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2011, 06:17:45 PM »
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Opps I Meant 11880 .. Sorry.. Embarrassed

Cheers
Jim Doyle
http://www.shadesofpaper.com
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elliot_n
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« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2011, 06:50:49 PM »
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How are you going to display these prints?

Given that your subject is portraits, is high gamut even relevant? (Colourful clothes, maybe?)

Not sure what you mean by 'high impact', but if you're showing bare prints (pinned, bulldog-clipped etc), Fuji Super Gloss on a Lightjet might fit the bill.
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2011, 05:03:06 AM »
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Gloss and High-Gloss paper don't go with glass over it. Too much reflections between the glass and the paper. So no glass but framed is my option for the moment.

Yes, the portraits include vivid colors from  clothes etc.

"High-Impact" agreed is maybe not the best choice of words, not very technical indeed, but it describes well, I think, what it is: Gamut, dMAx... the usual suspects.

Regarding the lighting, I will change the standard halogen bulbs against Solux 3600K.

kind regards
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elliot_n
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« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2011, 06:15:05 PM »
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For my own exhibition prints I have a strong preference for digital c-types over inkjet prints, but if you want to preserve vivid colours then inkjet is your best option.
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Nino Loss
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« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2011, 06:18:42 PM »
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For my own exhibition prints I have a strong preference for digital c-types over inkjet prints, but if you want to preserve vivid colours then inkjet is your best option.

Would you mind to tell me why you prefer the c-prints. (I'm biased because, for me, in an "art art" gallery environment they sell better ;-)
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elliot_n
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« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2011, 07:45:01 PM »
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Would you mind to tell me why you prefer the c-prints. (I'm biased because, for me, in an "art art" gallery environment they sell better ;-)

Yes, there's that - the art buyer's preference. Also:

- the way they hang when just the top two corners are pinned to a wall
- the total absence of any gloss differential
- the size (72" wide Lightjet)
- the fact that they look and feel like photographs used to look and feel

I'm not bothered by gamut and dmax. digital c-types have plenty of both for my work.

I like inkjet prints too. I print my portfolios on Harman FB Gloss. For that purpose (bare 16"x20" prints) the Harman paper handles better than c-types (which would kink when handled).
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Gandalf
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« Reply #27 on: February 16, 2011, 12:30:05 AM »
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I will admit that I am not up on the latest and greatest inkjet technology, but if you are talking about impact, I have never seen a print that surpasses Fuji Supergloss. When it comes to labs, they are not all created equal and therefore the prints are not equal, regardless of the equipment. One of my local labs runs the same Chromira printers as Westcoast Imaging, but can't match output quality by a mile. Another local lab (Photo Craft) runs a Lightjet 430, which I have been told is somewhat inferior to a Chromira, and their print quality is the best of the three. A Lightjet or Chromira is inferior to a new inkjet in pretty much everything you can measure, but if you want huge prints that blow people away, they are tough to beat.

All that said, I am not familiar with the inkjet papers recommended above, but I'm not sure I would want to deal with a 50x70 print on Supergloss. That stuff is a little fragile and is hard to work with (it's basically like Cibachrome), but it is absolutely stunning.
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