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Author Topic: Winter block  (Read 4137 times)
Diver
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« on: February 07, 2011, 01:26:00 PM »
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It's grey outside. The weak winter sun can't get through the thick clouds. Bicyclists struggle against the strong winds and rains that accompany the zillionth storm depression drifting in from the sea. Christmas season is over, dark, dreary, endless january has finally dragged itself to an end, but you know that there's no serious wheather change expected for months.
And all your great photo equipment sits in your closet gathering dust. You longingly touch the shutter button, stroke a fine lens. You dream about migrating to a better climate zone, but you know harsh realities make that impossible, it's no option.  Undecided
Sounds familiar? It certainly is for this guy from LensRentals, and he has some remedies too:
https://www.lensrentals.com/news/2009.02.08/breaking-photographer-s-block

If dealing with this kind of weather for months on end is your reality too, how do you handle it? Have you got tips that might inspire other photographers?

Regards,

Diver

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wolfnowl
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2011, 02:07:35 PM »
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Don't remember the author, but it's been said that writer's block is not when you're sitting there staring at the blank page (or screen).  Writer's block is when you're doing everything BUT sitting there staring at the blank page.  Photographer's block would be the same.  Photographer Jay Maisel says he never goes on photo shoots because he takes his camera with him wherever he goes.  Photography is about light, but it's also about seeing.  Teach yourself to see differently and you open up an entirely new world to your view.

Mike.
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mikev1
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2011, 01:08:43 AM »
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I struggle with this as well up here in Calgary.  I generally prefer large sweeping landscapes but when the weather is bad i slap on the longer lenses (100mm+) and look for the little details that I often overlook.  If it is overcast try to keep the sky out of the picture, look to the ground.
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bretedge
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« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2011, 08:06:23 AM »
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This is something I'm incredibly fortunate not to have to deal with.  I live in Moab, and with Arches, Canyonlands and Dead Horse Point SP 1/2 an hour away, there is always something to photograph - even in the dead of winter.  In fact, in winter the tourists are gone, snow on the red rocks is quite photogenic, and the light is outstanding.  However, I do tire of seeing nothing but red and brown and being cold all the time.  When that happens, I head for warmer climates.  Even just a few days at another location (Pacific NW?) is enough to rejuvenate me.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2011, 10:29:02 AM »
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I usually do a lot of photography in the winter, but this winter all of my usual spots are inaccessible because of the huge snow depth. So a couple of weeks ago I bought my first ever pair of snowshoes. With them I can now go anywhere I want to, and they are a great way to get healthful exercise. Since they have built-in crampons, I can even safely go down gentle slopes to get close to the edge of strams and ponds, where I wouldn't dare try to go on skis (OK, so I'm pretty clumsy).

Now I'm wishing I had bought snowshoes ten years ago when I was still a youthful sixty-something.  Smiley

No blocks for me!

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2011, 12:44:13 PM »
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Eric is right on the mark with this...my gut and spruce snowshoes from the 50's and 60's (pickerels) are long and extremely effecient in deep snow, but can get you hung up in some of the snow to ice to snow...Like Eric about 5 or 6 years ago I bought the new style (easily matched to your body weight and width of stride) and they are SLICK! Easy in easy out over all types of footwear, hiking boots etc and crampons built in to boot...slip on a back pack take one focal length with you, extra batteries, a thermos of something warm and handwarmers for your battery storage area of pack and you are good to really get engrossed in a way you wouldn't even have imagined when setting out..poles are most often included and really should be considered a must for stream and wall hopping...don't even take your camera the first time ...just take a looksee and enthusiasm can't help but follow...(also 2 types of gloves, thin and tactile for shooting, good and warm for snowshoeing...)
« Last Edit: February 26, 2011, 12:45:51 PM by Patricia Sheley » Logged

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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2011, 01:04:05 PM »
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Yes snowshoes are good: stable and secure. I use them just to get around my yard, where this picture was taken.

Hints? Wear mittens over your shooting gloves so you never have bare fingers, just slip off the mitts.

If you put your lens cap in a pocket, make sure the inside of the cap is facing out away from your body so that condensation doesn't collect on it and eventually end up on the lens.

Scott
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2011, 04:34:26 PM »
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This has been the best reason for forgetting about blocks and watching tv instead that I've come across in a long time!

You risk your life to take pictures - for fun?

I've just been watching a tv show on a Canadian songwriter/singer called Ron Sexsmith. Well, I did for the best part of an hour because I was still wondering why I'd spent the previous one watching another docu on Callas. I concluded that one opening riff from Chuck Berry was worth the pair of them. No, I recant: that would be to diminish Mr Berry. So what value a snapper's block?

I have no idea how the Sexsmith saga panned out; I'd rather just sit here and type.

Rob C

« Last Edit: March 04, 2011, 04:44:16 PM by Rob C » Logged

Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #8 on: March 05, 2011, 04:17:42 PM »
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You risk your life to take pictures - for fun?
Rob C
Water seethes toward frozen coast, ice and snow fall on her face, lighted cabin might be a better place , but wide journeys, sometimes filled with ghosts, sing a music of life well lived...do any of us know what time remains... venture now...heed the siren call to not regret...
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tom b
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2011, 05:14:37 PM »
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You could always come downunder…

Cheers,
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neile
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« Reply #10 on: March 06, 2011, 12:27:45 PM »
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In the last couple of years I've gotten into the habit of ensuring I have at least one dedicated photo trip per quarter. They don't have to be extravagant workshops; more often than not they are just a trip to the coast with a few close photo friends. It does an amazing job of getting the photography juices flowing again even if the weather is crappy (and in the Pacific NW, it seems in the fall, winter, and spring the weather is always crappy!).

Neil
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Rob C
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« Reply #11 on: March 06, 2011, 01:21:40 PM »
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Water seethes toward frozen coast, ice and snow fall on her face, lighted cabin might be a better place , but wide journeys, sometimes filled with ghosts, sing a music of life well lived...do any of us know what time remains... venture now...heed the siren call to not regret...



This is the first season that I've started to care about time remaning since I lost my wife.

It's all about photography now, a feeling of work yet undone - and there seem to be projects opening up (music, at the moment) that were totally unexpected even six weeks ago. So yep, never give up because even if it take one helluva huge thunderhead to provide it, that tiny silver lining really can show its blessed presence...

Rob C
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John R Smith
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« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2011, 02:32:30 AM »
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Well, you know there are other things in life besides photography, shocking as that may sound. Here in Cornwall we don't get much snow, just endless wet gloomy murk (or so it seems). But that is just the time to get down to another creative activity, like writing, or some guitar playing, or even some creative re-prints of past work . . .

And nothing beats settling down by a roaring fire with a good book and a glass of wine  Wink

John
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David Watson
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« Reply #13 on: March 07, 2011, 04:04:20 AM »
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Well, you know there are other things in life besides photography, shocking as that may sound. Here in Cornwall we don't get much snow, just endless wet gloomy murk (or so it seems). But that is just the time to get down to another creative activity, like writing, or some guitar playing, or even some creative re-prints of past work . . .

And nothing beats settling down by a roaring fire with a good book and a glass of wine  Wink

John

LOL Hear hear John.  Personally I prefer a fire with a roaring book and a good wine - not necessarily in that order.  On the East coast of England we see the sun before you do but not very frequently and not recently although today is an exception.  I know someone who only takes photographs in the spring and autumn, processes in the winter and spends time with family and friends eating and drinking in the summer.  Sounds like a plan.   Cheesy
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