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Author Topic: how much does museum glass cost?  (Read 23236 times)
framah
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« Reply #20 on: February 08, 2011, 04:00:12 PM »
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Yes, Museum Glass will show reflections as a green tint. It doesn't change the color of the art. Regular glass actually changes the color of art. Put a piece of regular glass next to a piece of MG on top of art and you will see the difference.
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juicy
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« Reply #21 on: February 08, 2011, 04:38:00 PM »
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I think the most expensive glass I've seen was called Mirogard. It's anti-reflective coated and laminated like a car windshield thus in case of an impact it won't damage the artwork. It's a pain to cut because of the laminated construction. You see it in museums guarding masterpieces when a 1,000 /sheet glass is not an issue.
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Sharon Van Lieu
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« Reply #22 on: February 08, 2011, 04:40:32 PM »
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Terry, I don't notice any tint with museum glass. It seems crystal clear.
Sharon
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JeffKohn
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« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2011, 05:44:03 PM »
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Am finally at my studio where I have my pricelist for glazing from my wholesaler. These prices are for the Pacific Northwest of the US:

TruVue Museum Glass 32x40" box of 3: $245.00
TruVue Acrylite Conservation Reflection Control 32x40" box of 3: $103.79
TruVue Acrylite Reflection Control 32x40" box of 3: $90.53
TruVue Acrylite Optimum Museum 48x96": $876.16

You can see why for my own work I go with the Conservation Reflection Control Acrylite. It's only $13 more expensive per box than the next grade down which is just Reflection Control, but less than half the price of Museum Glass.
Wow, why is the Optium (acrylic w/anti-glare optical coating) so much more expensive than the museum glass?
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2011, 06:44:09 PM »
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Wow, why is the Optium (acrylic w/anti-glare optical coating) so much more expensive than the museum glass?
It is abrasive resistant compared to their other acrylic offerings and has superior optical properties.  Whether this is worth the premium price is up to the buyer.  One thing to remember is that any paper with OBAs such as Epson Exhibition Fiber will not perform under this glazing because of the UV filtering.
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MHMG
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« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2011, 08:22:20 PM »
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The Optium Museum product also comes in greater thicknesses, for museum exhibition designers to make special display cases. The greater thickness allows pieces to be butted and seamlessly glued.

cheers,
Mark
http://www.aardenburg-imaging.com
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Aristoc
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« Reply #26 on: February 09, 2011, 09:47:36 AM »
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After all of the options/prices and debate, it just might be better to keep the off the shelf glass that comes packaged with the frame I bought from the art store. Unless there is a problem with it.
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neile
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« Reply #27 on: February 09, 2011, 09:51:45 AM »
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The only issues with it are the reflection and lack of UV protection. If you are hanging the print in a relatively dim location you don't need the UV protection. If you don't mind the reflection you don't need the anti-reflection properties.

Personally I love the look of the acrylite I use. It pretty much disappears in front of the image.

Neil
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Neil Enns
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AFairley
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« Reply #28 on: February 09, 2011, 10:36:47 AM »
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One thing to remember is that any paper with OBAs such as Epson Exhibition Fiber will not perform under this glazing because of the UV filtering.

I print on EEF and I don't really see this effect, either under the Tru-Vue regular UV protecting glass or under Museum Glass.  I wonder if this fear is overblown in terms of real world viewing.
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #29 on: February 09, 2011, 12:12:11 PM »
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I print on EEF and I don't really see this effect, either under the Tru-Vue regular UV protecting glass or under Museum Glass.  I wonder if this fear is overblown in terms of real world viewing.
If it is really UV protecting acrylic, you will not get any of the OBA effect as the UV needed to cause fluorescence is filtered out.  If you go to Ernst Dinkla's site and look at the spectrum plot for Epson Traditional Photo (the Euro trade name for EEF) you can see how there is very little light reflectance below 400 nm.  This is where the OBA is absorbing light and this gets emitted at 440 nm where the peak fluorescence occurs.  This is what give this paper the unique properties (though such behavior will decay with time as the OBAs decay).  I think Museum Glass provides UV protection so you would not see any difference between the three above assuming they all have pretty much the same UV filtering effect.  You would need to compare those samples with one framed under normal acrylic or even a bare print to see the difference.
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MHMG
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« Reply #30 on: February 09, 2011, 02:33:28 PM »
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I print on EEF and I don't really see this effect, either under the Tru-Vue regular UV protecting glass or under Museum Glass.  I wonder if this fear is overblown in terms of real world viewing.

Take a sheet of EEF. Lay a piece of ordinary framing glass, a piece of standard Acrylic, and a sheet of OP3 acrylic and/or Museum glass on portions of the EEF paper. Make sure you are illuminating it with natural daylight or an artificial source that has some UV energy component. It will be very hard NOT to see distinct paper color changes with this test. For those that don't see any difference, all I can suggest is that 8% of the male population is color blind ;-).
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #31 on: February 09, 2011, 03:33:04 PM »
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For those that don't see any difference, all I can suggest is that 8% of the male population is color blind ;-).
Or that their UV acrylic is misbranded! Cheesy
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2011, 11:12:01 PM »
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I would only advise tru-vue  either AR anti reflection blocks 76% of the UV which is about $145-175.00 depending wether its on sale and you get 3 32x40 pieces.  I will not frame with anything less.  You also can get this in 40x60 also for 2 pieces for 240-260.00.   Its easy to cut you need to get a good glass cutter.  If you buy one at the framing supply store you got ripped off.  Go to your local glass store and order what they use. 

The only other glass I would use is truvue Museum glass with anti-reflection blocks about 97-98% of the UV.  This glass is now offered in 5 sizes and often goes on sale. 

Now just get some great lighting and pick some great frames.  Of course there is more you have to know, like how to mount your print and use matts.  I may be at the convention in the upcoming year showing how to do this, but to busy this year.  Tim
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neile
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« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2011, 11:29:53 PM »
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I long ago gave up trying to cut plexi with a glass cutter (score + snap). Ruined so many sheets that way. I bought a proper saw blade and now cut it on my table saw. So much easier Smiley

Neil
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Neil Enns
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framah
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« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2011, 08:54:39 AM »
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"The only other glass I would use is truvue Museum glass with anti-reflection blocks about 97-98% of the UV.  This glass is now offered in 5 sizes and often goes on sale."

Actually there are 9 different sizes available:
16x20
18x24
20x24
22x28
24x30
24x36
32x40
36x48
40x60

At least that is what is available from my distributor.


Neil.... you need to get an actual plexi scorer. It has a hooked cutter which cuts a groove into the plexi. You need to score it at least 1/3rd of the way thru for it to run clean. A single score will not do it and will most likely break wrong.

Even using my wall mounted cutter,  I will score the plexi  3 times for 1/8th and a couple more times for 1/4. Then I just hold it at the edge on either side of the score and bend it back  and it will run right down the length of the piece.

Table saws are so messy with all that plexi schmutz plus it sticks to everything!

Get a catalog from United Manufacturers and they sell things like hand held plexi scorers and all sorts of stuff you do and don't need but will probably want anyhow.



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neile
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« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2011, 09:35:11 AM »
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Oh, I tried Farmah! I have an actual plexi scorer from my framing supply house. I'd score a good way through and try to snap, but no love. The table saw is quick, easy, and in the garage so it doesn't really matter if fluff gets around Smiley

Neil
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Neil Enns
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AFairley
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« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2011, 12:52:42 PM »
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Take a sheet of EEF. Lay a piece of ordinary framing glass, a piece of standard Acrylic, and a sheet of OP3 acrylic and/or Museum glass on portions of the EEF paper. Make sure you are illuminating it with natural daylight or an artificial source that has some UV energy component. It will be very hard NOT to see distinct paper color changes with this test. For those that don't see any difference, all I can suggest is that 8% of the male population is color blind ;-).

I stand corrected.  I did this with a scrap of museum glass and a sheet of EEF using the white area of a ceral carton and a while plasitc waste basket as controls.  I could in fact see that the EEF under the glass looked darker than the uncovered EEF, unlike the controls where there was little difference at all (the Musuem Glass has a very slight warming effect IMO).  So thanks for setting me straight.
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AFairley
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« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2011, 12:54:30 PM »
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The only other glass I would use is truvue Museum glass with anti-reflection blocks about 97-98% of the UV.  This glass is now offered in 5 sizes and often goes on sale.

Tim, is there any pattern to these sales, how do you find out about them?
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tim wolcott
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« Reply #38 on: February 10, 2011, 05:31:37 PM »
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I offer the framing to my gallery clients as a near cost price change.  I'm in the business of selling my exhibition prints and do not see the framing as a money making part of my business.  This way  get my print exhibited in the home or business just the way I want everyone to see my work.  This always leads to more sales in the end.  Most galleries bend over the client, with no happy ending.  This way I never have a complaint and I always get referrals.  Just my philosophy.  But I have been doing this for more than 20 years.  Even when showing in snooty galleries my images always look better than any others.  Bad glass, bad lighting, bad frames can ruin just about any artwork.  Take away the variables and you win considering everything else is equal. T

But I would never ever use reflection control glass, even if the client prefers it.  I show them the difference and they always go for the my glass
« Last Edit: February 10, 2011, 05:33:31 PM by tim wolcott » Logged
pindman
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« Reply #39 on: February 11, 2011, 09:30:23 AM »
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Where can you buy it if you're an end user.  Most of the places I've found only sell wholesale.  Thanks.

Paul

quote author=framah link=topic=51201.msg422230#msg422230 date=1297349679]
"The only other glass I would use is truvue Museum glass with anti-reflection blocks about 97-98% of the UV.  This glass is now offered in 5 sizes and often goes on sale."

Actually there are 9 different sizes available:
16x20
18x24
20x24
22x28
24x30
24x36
32x40
36x48
40x60

At least that is what is available from my distributor.


Neil.... you need to get an actual plexi scorer. It has a hooked cutter which cuts a groove into the plexi. You need to score it at least 1/3rd of the way thru for it to run clean. A single score will not do it and will most likely break wrong.

Even using my wall mounted cutter,  I will score the plexi  3 times for 1/8th and a couple more times for 1/4. Then I just hold it at the edge on either side of the score and bend it back  and it will run right down the length of the piece.

Table saws are so messy with all that plexi schmutz plus it sticks to everything!

Get a catalog from United Manufacturers and they sell things like hand held plexi scorers and all sorts of stuff you do and don't need but will probably want anyhow.




[/quote]
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