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Author Topic: Working in ProPhotoRGB, deciding what to deliver  (Read 1928 times)
billrcahill
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« on: February 13, 2011, 09:07:11 AM »
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I am a studio photographer who uses a P45 into Capture one.  Until now I have always processed 8bit AdobeRGB files. I am now have new computers and I am considering changing my workflow, and considering working 16bit prophotoRGB. Then taking those into lightroom.
On the article about prophoto rgb, the last line states "Anyone receiving a copy of such a file who doesn't know what they have, and who doesn't function in a properly colour managed workflow, or who presumes that the file is sRGB, can inadvertently use it to produce some really horrid results." 
So ad agencies being what they are. Should I convert my files to AdobeRGB before sending to my clients?

www.bill-cahill.com
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2011, 10:21:25 AM »
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I'd always suggest asking clients what format they want their images delivered in.
If they don't know send them sRGB, it's the least likely to be wrecked by incompetent workflows.
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billrcahill
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2011, 10:23:35 AM »
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I have been fine with Adobe RGB. My clients aren't innept, I just didn't understand why the article states you can get horrible results from Prophotorgb.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2011, 10:47:34 AM »
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Hi,

Two issues.

1) ProPhoto RGB is much wider than either sRGB or Adobe RGB, any improper conversion of Prophoto RGB to lesser RGBs would give false color.

2) 24 bit color may not be appropriate for ProPhoto RGB.

So, if you send 48 bit files to your customers and they know about color management, send them Prophoto RGB and everyone is going to be happy.

If you send JPEGs or 24 bit TIFFs to your customers you may use either sRGB or Adobe RGB. The two are quite similar but Adobe RGB has larger gamut in the greens.

As long as the image is properly tagged colors will be OK if the customer has a color managed workflow. If the customers mixes up the difference between Adobe RGB and sRGB is not large enough to cause a real mess.

Finally, if all colors in the image fit within sRGB, there is little reason to use any wider RGB.

Best regards
Erik


I have been fine with Adobe RGB. My clients aren't innept, I just didn't understand why the article states you can get horrible results from Prophotorgb.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2011, 11:23:02 AM »
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In a nutshell, if you suspect someone on the receiving end of a document is weak understanding color management, send them sRGB. If you know they know the differences, its probably OK to send them ProPhoto RGB. While the later has a significantly larger color space, useful for output, its not beneficial if they treat them incorrectly.
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Andrew Rodney
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2011, 12:04:46 PM »
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It might also be worth considering that although ProPhoto has a wider gamut, very few commercial end uses will be able to utilise the extra colours possible.
Sending wide gamut images may be pointless anyway.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2011, 12:06:52 PM »
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It might also be worth considering that although ProPhoto has a wider gamut, very few commercial end uses will be able to utilise the extra colours possible.
Sending wide gamut images may be pointless anyway.

All or most of the colors yes. Some, many outside sRGB no. But the potential miss handling of ProPhoto RGB far out weight the benefits here.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011, 04:32:18 PM »
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So ad agencies being what they are. Should I convert my files to AdobeRGB before sending to my clients?

So, here's the thing...you simply can't assume ANYTHING...it'll come back to bite you and in the grand scheme of things, it's up to YOU professionally to save clients from themselves...

It all comes down to knowledge and experience. Do a test, ask the agency what version of Photoshop they are using. If more than 2 versions old, send sRGB.

Ask who handles the display profiling for the art directors, if they don't understand the question, send sRGB.

If they do profile the displays, ask what is there "standard RGB working space profile" in Photoshop. If they don't understand the question, send sRGB.

If they tell you that Adobe RGB is their standard RGB working space, send them Adobe RGB.

If you have a good working relationship and you know for an absolute fact they are color management savvy (and have their Photoshop Color Settings set to use embedded profile when opening) you could consider sending them Pro Photo RGB files. There are some advantages to converting from ProPhoto RGB vs Adobe RGB. Not a lot...cyan and yellow/orange might benefit from being converted from ProPhoto RGB instead of Adobe RGB. But if there is ANY question, use Adobe RGB.

The other thing you might consider is actually delivering final sized and output sharpened images in CMYK (and charging for the service).
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