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Author Topic: Absolute beginners  (Read 28676 times)
NigelC
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« on: February 14, 2011, 02:43:39 PM »
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Hope someone will find time to answer some very basic queries about storage, download, editing and playback. I've never been much into video - when I do with LX3, usually play back on HD TV with component lead and then delete. Generally not found 5D2 video easy to use, but that's another matter. I will be getting GH2/14-140 + 20mm soon and intend to use video more, but at current time only for personal use. So here are my questions.

1. 5D2 has HDMI, GH2 had mini HDMI, LX3 has component out. I take it these all need separate leads, not one lead with adaptors to play straight onto TV?

2. My preferred mode of playback is onto HD TV rather than on computer (with 5D2 I've been restricted to playing back in zoombrowser). Presumably, once downloaded from card, only way to play on TV is converted file burnt onto DVD?

3. I know nothing of recording formats for video. All I want to do is minimum necessary to get movie clips onto DVD, so that I can play on HDTV or on computer in Quicktime/Windows Media Player. Editing will be probably limited to cutting/splicing (yes I remember clockwork 8mm!) and adding soundtrack. So 5D2 and Panny use different recording formats - is there one (not expensive!) Windows software package that will convert output from both? (Does Premiere Elemsnts 9 do the job - what about Ulead Studio 11?)

4. When I've downloaded 5D2 movie files onto Jobo Giga One portable HD, laptop doesn't recognise those files. Is this just an issue of old portable storage medium?
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #1 on: February 14, 2011, 02:57:34 PM »
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As far as a video codec converter is concerned, I cannot recommend more highly than a free app called MPEG StreamClip. It is available free for both Windows & Mac

I would not put your files on a DVD Video which requires special software and very old-fashioned encoding.

Find a video playback app that you like and output your video via HDMI from a set-top box Media Player
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Christopher Sanderson
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NigelC
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« Reply #2 on: February 14, 2011, 04:42:50 PM »
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As far as a video codec converter is concerned, I cannot recommend more highly than a free app called MPEG StreamClip. It is available free for both Windows & Mac

I would not put your files on a DVD Video which requires special software and very old-fashioned encoding.

Find a video playback app that you like and output your video via HDMI from a set-top box Media Player

You'll have to forgive me, I don't possess a smartphone and am not of the twit(ter) generation - you mean having converted my video and edited in some sort of software, I then copy form laptop onto a "set top media Player" - this is like a hard drive which connects to TV via HDMI?
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #3 on: February 14, 2011, 09:24:23 PM »
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Exactly
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Christopher Sanderson
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2011, 02:08:20 PM »
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OK, for those of us who even more absolute beginners than others, can anyone recommend a set top media box thingy that works in the UK (PAL)?  Googling brings up  a bewildering array of technical data which is beyond me.  I want to edit in FCP or Premiere Pro and output to a HD Television.  In a Mac orientated house is Mac TV of any interest or do I want to buy something with an integral hard disk and deal with that?  Any beginner's tips or sources with names and descriptions of what these things actually do?

Thanks
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Chris Sanderson
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« Reply #5 on: February 17, 2011, 05:08:22 PM »
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Since your household is Mac orientated, yes, an Apple TV is a reasonable place to start and fairly inexpensive. It basically allows the playback of HD (720P not 1080) and SD onto your TV via the network (Ethernet or Airport wireless) through an HDMI cable.

But -- why is there always a 'but'?

The device is controlled by iTunes, so any media it plays needs to be imported into iTunes first (unless you jailbreak/hack it). Also it is not a storage device; all media would reside on a designated HD attached or in your computer.

The device is really a marketing conduit to media on the iTunes Store.

Alternatives are Sony Playststion, X-Box, WesternDigital Media Player.

I just looked at the Curry's Web site to see what may be in general use in the UK - nothing of the WD sort yet...
« Last Edit: February 17, 2011, 05:14:27 PM by Chris Sanderson » Logged

Christopher Sanderson
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« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2011, 05:30:56 PM »
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Since your household is Mac orientated, yes, an Apple TV is a reasonable place to start and fairly inexpensive. It basically allows the playback of HD (720P not 1080) and SD onto your TV via the network (Ethernet or Airport wireless) through an HDMI cable.

But -- why is there always a 'but'?

The device is controlled by iTunes, so any media it plays needs to be imported into iTunes first (unless you jailbreak/hack it). Also it is not a storage device; all media would reside on a designated HD attached or in your computer.

The device is really a marketing conduit to media on the iTunes Store.

Alternatives are Sony Playststion, X-Box, WesternDigital Media Player.

I just looked at the Curry's Web site to see what may be in general use in the UK - nothing of the WD sort yet...

Not quite true. The Apple TV is not controlled by iTunes, it has its own interface with remote control. The Apple TV can also stream from cloud computing such as an Apple .me account, idisk, YouTube, podcasts, Netflix, internet radio as well as iTunes.
It can stream directly from an iPhone, iPod or iPad.

Is is limited to 720p resolution.
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Gerald J Skrocki
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« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2011, 08:24:48 PM »
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Yes, but to play ones own video files, they have to be imported into the iTunes library
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Christopher Sanderson
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« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2011, 11:17:37 PM »
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Yes, but to play ones own video files, they have to be imported into the iTunes library

Again,no. You can simply upload your video files to your mobile me account and stream them directly to your TV through this device.
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Gerald J Skrocki
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NigelC
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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2011, 04:20:19 PM »
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As far as a video codec converter is concerned, I cannot recommend more highly than a free app called MPEG StreamClip. It is available free for both Windows & Mac

I would not put your files on a DVD Video which requires special software and very old-fashioned encoding.

Find a video playback app that you like and output your video via HDMI from a set-top box Media Player

Can I revisit this? I thought that video editing software allowed you to burn it onto DVD. What if you want to distribute a video to many people, as a momento, for example. DVD is easily the most convenient way to do this. What's the problem - is it a quality, or a convenience issue?
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2011, 05:12:59 PM »
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I thought that video editing software allowed you to burn it onto DVD.
Well sort of.
Burning to disc can be fairly complex in terms of specific files structures, building menus etc. so most editing packages come with a separate program for building the disc.

DVD is primarily a standard definition format, so you'd have to down convert 5D/GH2 material for distribution on DVD.  For proper HD you really need to be looking at Blu-Ray discs.

Optical discs remain the only practical way of distributing high quality video content, online just involves too many compromises or difficulties.
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NigelC
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« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2011, 03:07:03 AM »
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Well sort of.
Burning to disc can be fairly complex in terms of specific files structures, building menus etc. so most editing packages come with a separate program for building the disc.

DVD is primarily a standard definition format, so you'd have to down convert 5D/GH2 material for distribution on DVD.  For proper HD you really need to be looking at Blu-Ray discs.

Optical discs remain the only practical way of distributing high quality video content, online just involves too many compromises or difficulties.


But a set top player willl deliver HD?
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2011, 03:23:27 AM »
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But a set top player willl deliver HD?
DVD players aren't capable of HD output, you need a Blu_Ray player for that.
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NigelC
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« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2011, 05:23:03 AM »
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DVD players aren't capable of HD output, you need a Blu_Ray player for that.

Well  my DVD player (Denon) does a sort of emulated HD which is very close to the real thing; but I thought there were actual HD DVD players - it may be different for PAL.

Anyway, bit beside the point - what I meant to say in respect of set top players wasn't a DVD player but the sort of Hard Drive thing Chris was referring to - I think Western Digital make one. Not sure if you can use Apple TV if everything else you've got is PC.
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Les Sparks
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« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2011, 11:21:12 AM »
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If you have the right software, you can write about 20 minutes or a bit more of high definition Blu Ray video using normal DVD media and the DVD burner on your computer. If you're using a PC, Magix's MEP17 Plus allows you to this. The video's I make this way play back fine in all their HD (1080i since my HD Camcorder using 1080i) glory on my Sony Blu Ray player. I'm sure that other editing programs provide the same functionality but MEP17 Plus is the only one I have direct experience with.

If you want longer play, then you need to invest in a Blu Ray burner and Blu Ray media both expensive.

If you want to provide copies to people who do not have Blu Ray players, then you need to burn a normal DVD (MEP17 Plus allows this too as do most other video editing products).  Up to date DVD players  can provide close to HD when they up convert normal stand definition DVDs. 

Les
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