Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 5 6 [7]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: If art is goal does gear matter so much?  (Read 88792 times)
kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #120 on: March 30, 2012, 04:05:40 AM »
ReplyReply


So - lets just keep it at that and not mess up things.


Maybe we could lighten up a bit.  Grin
Logged

Christoph C. Feldhaim
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2509


There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #121 on: March 30, 2012, 04:09:49 AM »
ReplyReply

Maybe we could lighten up a bit.  Grin

 Wink
Logged

popnfresh
Guest
« Reply #122 on: March 30, 2012, 12:17:04 PM »
ReplyReply

I think it doesn't make sense to attempt to prove an experience.
How should I prove the smell of a rose to an Inuit?
I think exchanging positions and experience in a civilized manner is enough in the context of this forum.
Then let me ask you this. How do you know that in the act there is no "I"? I create art. I do all sorts of things. Yet I've never acted when "I" wasn't present and accounted for. You say there is no "I" in the action, I say if there is no "I" there is no action.
Logged
Christoph C. Feldhaim
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2509


There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #123 on: March 30, 2012, 01:18:53 PM »
ReplyReply

Then let me ask you this. How do you know that in the act there is no "I"? I create art. I do all sorts of things. Yet I've never acted when "I" wasn't present and accounted for. You say there is no "I" in the action, I say if there is no "I" there is no action.

It is clear we are not in the realm of strict logic here.
Logic just checks if named cause and consequence (the statement) follow certain laws (the laws of logic).

What I was trying here, was to point out a certain experience of being or a state of mind which is a real experience.
I also tried to give some lose hints why the concept how I expressed it in my opinion works.
But these are all just words and limited symbols.
The real experience of the "ego not existing" or "just being" in a sort of open, non-narrowed and free and especially unspectacular state of mind can not be told, just sort of be pointed to.
I am quite sure there are many on this forum who would maybe express this differently, maybe not even like the language how I tried to explain it, but still have this sort of experience - often most likely even without thinking about it.
There are things we can't share if the other person does not have the respective experience.
Its a dilemma, but it is just so.
And an experience of forgetting oneself and ones concepts and just be and perform (play, photograph, whatever) in the free and open way I attempted to describe is not explainable in a classical or even logical way.
It can only be explained in a sort of poetic, even illogic language.

And - it is not possible to "see" what I am trying to point out and really analyze it.
Its something different.
You can't grab it and take it home so to say.
And actually it is not so overly important as well.
Trying to improve as an artist and just not take ideas, concepts and oneself too serious is much enough.

The ego never vanishes while not being braindead. There you are right - of course. But thats not what I was trying to tell.

I think I can't make it much clearer here, and I think I won't try much more.
You are required now to understand for yourself or just forget this discussion and mark it as complete rubbish.

Cheers
~Chris
« Last Edit: March 30, 2012, 01:23:44 PM by Christoph C. Feldhaim » Logged

John Gellings
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 31


« Reply #124 on: November 29, 2012, 07:14:19 AM »
ReplyReply

It seems many people look for a simple technological fix to make good photographs.  If one gets the "right" printer, software, camera, then that beautiful scene will be automatically transferred to the print.


Well, technically speaking it could be good.  Equipment helps to give a certain quality to your output. However, what will never be a simple technological fix is framing and content.  You still have to point the camera and choose what to include / exclude.

Quote
I  like to equate it to the carpentry trade.  Very few people ask a carpenter what type of hammer, skill saw,  or level he/she uses after he/she has built a wonderful structure.  Why is it so important to photographers?  Certainly good equipment helps make good images, but when I goes back into the history of photography, there are books filled with great images made by very rudimentary equipment.

The difference is that photography is derivative (you are photographing something that exists already generally speaking) and carpentry starts from nothing but raw materials that are shaped into something completely different.  Of course there are exceptions to both.  
« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 08:04:59 AM by John Gellings » Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2834


« Reply #125 on: November 29, 2012, 10:51:45 AM »
ReplyReply

The hands down, #1 question I am asked,   "What kind of camera do you use?". It bugs me, but I am trying to sell, so I am polite and tell them.
...
Very few people ask a carpenter what type of hammer, skill saw,  or level he/she uses after he/she has built a wonderful structure.  Why is it so important to photographers?

Perhaps the slight equivocation makes this harder to understand than need be, once we change that to "Very few [carpenters] ask a carpenter what type of hammer, ..." I start to think it's likely most carpenters do ask other carpenters about technique.

"Why is it so important to [people]?" -- because so many people have some experience of photography and try to relate what they have done to what you have done. (Far fewer people have any experience of carpentry.)
Logged
kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #126 on: November 29, 2012, 03:03:34 PM »
ReplyReply

"Why is it so important to [people]?" -- because so many people have some experience of photography and try to relate what they have done to what you have done. (Far fewer people have any experience of carpentry.)
Exactly. And particularly, if they admire your work, because they hope that they could do something like it if they had your equipment. Take it as a compliment. People probably don't ask too many questions about what equipment was used to take photographs they hate.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2012, 03:06:38 PM by kencameron » Logged

Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2834


« Reply #127 on: November 29, 2012, 03:10:07 PM »
ReplyReply

People probably don't ask too many questions about what equipment was used to take photographs they hate.

Except when they are being polite :-)
Logged
kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #128 on: November 29, 2012, 03:29:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Except when they are being polite :-)

Or overtly hostile, I guess.  "What kind of camera did you use to take that?". But I am sure that LuLa members rarely get either of those responses.
Logged

Pages: « 1 ... 5 6 [7]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad