Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 2 [3] 4 5 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: A bit off topic...Bernard Languillier  (Read 12995 times)
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2907

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #40 on: March 20, 2011, 07:10:25 PM »
ReplyReply

To put things into perspective, a radiation dose chart:

http://xkcd.com/radiation/

The chart contains Fukushima plant radiation as well.

Now that's an inconvenient truth.
Logged

Schewe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5253


WWW
« Reply #41 on: March 20, 2011, 07:31:59 PM »
ReplyReply

The chart contains Fukushima plant radiation as well.

As is stands now...the Japan emergency isn't over yet...and those workers who are trying to bring the reactors (and spent fuel) under control are seriously risking very high doses of radiation and their very lives...the chart listed above doesn't really count for those workers because we don't really know what their individual exposures were/are yet.
Logged
eronald
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 3624



WWW
« Reply #42 on: March 20, 2011, 08:46:56 PM »
ReplyReply

Maybe you are french? Every time something happens, the french media start looking at the role of the other media rather than try and establish facts on the ground. Nombrilisme (navel-centerdness) is what the french call this behavior of the french press looking at the press Smiley

I think I used to be a scientist (in France Polytechnique is considered a decent scientific institution although it is unknown outside France) and I have taken a few courses in some science subjects when much younger, and about 5 minutes of looking at the media would make me run as far as possible from Fukushima as humanly possible. It's impressive that you think differently.

As long as it is not necessary to leave Tokyo, it will be possible to leave Tokyo. When it will be necessary, it won't be possible.

Edmund


Hello my friends,

Just a quick message to confirm that my wife and I are indeed doing well. I do appreciate your concern! We have been in Osaka for a few days and currently intend to move back to Tokyo on Monday.

Our own situation is comfortable in absolute term and shamefully so compared to what folks in Northern Japan are now facing. We are now looking at ways to help.

Regarding the nuclear thing. The situation in Fukushima has indeed shown some signs of improvement but remains serious. We have now basically accepted the fact that there would be no clear cut miracle with a sharp transition from disaster to normal. It is going to take more time and there are going to be a certain level of impacts that will vary gradually depending on the distance from the source. I do not believe that Tokyo will be affected in a major way, it seems more likely to have a limited increase of ambient radioactivity for some time. How much and how long is unclear but most experts do not anticipate any negative effect on health outside a narrow area surrounding the Fukushima plants.

Today, there is a growing irritation in Japan regarding the cheap sensationalism of the WW media. We are getting tired of reading mild disappointment in the eyes of commentators when there is no new explosion to report on or a drop in radioactivity. Let's face it, it looks like CNN would really prefer this to stay hot as long as possible. BBC World is once more the international media outlet coming very far on top of the rest of the herd.

Many people from different nationalities and background I have spoken with these past few days consider this crisis to seal the death of journalism as we have known it, more so than the death of Nuclear technology. I know understand how millions of people have felt all these years about being reported upon that way. We do of course understand though that some of that is the result of the work performed by different lobbies with vested interests, for or against Nuclear energy, for or against a healthy Japanese economy,...

A lot of positive things can also be seen though. Many countries have really tried to help Japan in various ways, we do feel a huge solidarity from citizens from various countries that have started to provide huge amounts of money to help with the reconstruction. That really is moving.

Cheers,
Bernard

« Last Edit: March 20, 2011, 08:48:32 PM by eronald » Logged

Edmund Ronald, Ph.D. 
ErikKaffehr
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6891


WWW
« Reply #43 on: March 21, 2011, 12:12:16 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi,

TEPCO is reporting on the doses and what doses are regarded acceptable. Initially one single employee had a dose of 100 millisievert but now TEPCO raised the limit to 150 millisievert. Those does rates would not cause acute radiation sickness nor would they lead to a detectable increase in cancer rates. No doubt the work is dangerous, anyway.

Best regards
Erik

 

As is stands now...the Japan emergency isn't over yet...and those workers who are trying to bring the reactors (and spent fuel) under control are seriously risking very high doses of radiation and their very lives...the chart listed above doesn't really count for those workers because we don't really know what their individual exposures were/are yet.
Logged

kikashi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3669



« Reply #44 on: March 21, 2011, 03:37:01 AM »
ReplyReply

I think I used to be a scientist (in France Polytechnique is considered a decent scientific institution although it is unknown outside France) and I have taken a few courses in some science subjects when much younger, and about 5 minutes of looking at the media would make me run as far as possible from Fukushima as humanly possible.
5 minutes of looking at the media would make me want to run as far as possible from newspaper offices. The level of half-baked scientific pontificating, based almost entirely on ignorance, is staggering. Even the BBC, normally at least semi-responsible, has been scaremongering to an alarming degree, desperate to talk to anyone, no matter how ignorant, who can speak English. A few days ago Newsnight, their flagship news analytical programme, discussed the situation in the reactor with a Japanese concert pianist, a Japanese writer and a Japanese actress who once appeared in a play about the Kobe earthquake. Ye Gods.

And yes, I do have a scientific education.

Jeremy
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7523



WWW
« Reply #45 on: March 21, 2011, 06:31:40 AM »
ReplyReply

As long as it is not necessary to leave Tokyo, it will be possible to leave Tokyo. When it will be necessary, it won't be possible.

Same thing with ordering Geiger counters. Smiley

Cheers,
Bernard

p.s.: I am not French by the way
Logged

A few images online here!
bcooter
Guest
« Reply #46 on: March 21, 2011, 09:30:18 AM »
ReplyReply

It's a small world and just about anywhere most of us have friends and associates in most areas of the world, so when a tragedy like this hits, it hits close to home.

My heart goes out for everyone that is suffering through this catastrophe and we're doing what we can to help.

After talking to people we know, there is a lot of frustration and some fear with in correct information.  

Some of it probably is non professional reporting, though a lot of it comes from the crisis itself, as things change quickly and verifying rumors is much more difficult that starting one.

The upside, if there is an upside, is the Japanese are a strong, sophisticated and proud culture that will make it right in time.

JR
Logged
Dick Roadnight
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1730


« Reply #47 on: March 21, 2011, 04:27:31 PM »
ReplyReply

The BBC report today re the nuclear situation is more encouraging... but, with the wind in the right direction, hopefully most of the nuclear contamination will blow away - but how much Agriculture is there in the area, and how long will it be before the Food from the area is safe to eat? (farms in the UK ere affected by Chernobyl.)

...but has everybody forgotten about the earthquake and tsunami?

The UK GNP dipped because we had one snowstorm - but the effect on the Japanese economy must be considerable - even if most of the population and Industry is in or South of Tokyo.
Logged

Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1722



« Reply #48 on: March 22, 2011, 09:40:28 PM »
ReplyReply

I work in Tokyo also and it was a day off for me when the quake hit. People were generally calm and disciplined, one of the reasons I like working for a Japanese airline, as a culture, they are disciplined and hard working. I was on an overnight in Nagoya when the central Japan quake hit and had just landed in Ibaraki when a 3rd quake hit. Ibaraki is about 70 kilometers south of the fukushima reactor and some had concerns flying in and out of Ibaraki. In general one usually has 2 or 3 infants onboard, these flights we had 35 to 50! many mothers, children and infants. Although some refused to fly these flights I found them rewording. I don't think there is a concern for the curent level of radiation it is the potential catastrophe if something went wrong in the future. Most of my expat friends sent their families home as a precaution. The sunami devistation is unbelievable some think in the end 40,000 casualties  Cry we have some flight attendants that still have not made contact with their families.
I will however spend my days off back in Hawaii!
Marc 
Logged

Marc McCalmont
Dick Roadnight
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1730


« Reply #49 on: April 10, 2011, 05:30:09 AM »
ReplyReply

How near normality is Japan now?
Logged

Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7523



WWW
« Reply #50 on: April 10, 2011, 08:42:11 AM »
ReplyReply

How near normality is Japan now?

It depends where in Japan. Situation is basically normal in Tokyo and less and less so the closer you get to the affected areas in the North East.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Eric Myrvaagnes
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7441



WWW
« Reply #51 on: April 10, 2011, 03:08:14 PM »
ReplyReply

I can't imagine that anything like "normalcy" will be achieved in the Northeast for a very long time.

Eric
Logged

-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #52 on: April 10, 2011, 04:07:17 PM »
ReplyReply

And with fresh quakes since the big sunami one, normal seems a distant concept.

I think I heard there are over 50 nuclear power plants in Japan; the mind boggles at the faith in human workmanship.

Rob C
Logged

marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1722



« Reply #53 on: April 10, 2011, 04:42:19 PM »
ReplyReply

Bernard
I'm wearing a dosimeter while I fly just to be safe and all the research that was done after Chernobyl indicates red wine is much more effective than potassium iodide for protection against radiation, so drink up! I've got several Ibarake flights this month and flying to Haneda from Chitose they vector us close to Fukushima so I'm sure I'm breathing more of that fine air than most.
Marc
Logged

Marc McCalmont
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2907

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #54 on: April 10, 2011, 06:32:16 PM »
ReplyReply

Bernard
I'm wearing a dosimeter while I fly just to be safe and all the research that was done after Chernobyl indicates red wine is much more effective than potassium iodide for protection against radiation, so drink up! I've got several Ibarake flights this month and flying to Haneda from Chitose they vector us close to Fukushima so I'm sure I'm breathing more of that fine air than most.
Marc

The risk is non-existent. And here I hoped media had already moved to the next Bugaboo Of The Month.

You will get more radiation from the flight itself: there is less atmosphere to protect you from cosmic radiation than at ground level *. Not to mention the "normal" pollution you breath in on the way to the airport, in big part thanks to the most dangerous power production technology which kills more people per year than nuclear power has ever done (including nuclear bombs): coal.

* just realized that's probably not reassuring for someone who carries a dosimeter... The dosage you get from flying planes as a profession is not a significant risk factor.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2011, 06:37:14 PM by feppe » Logged

Clyde RF
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 33


« Reply #55 on: April 10, 2011, 11:48:23 PM »
ReplyReply

The nuclear vs fossil fuel debate will continue to rage while the life support capacity of the planet continues to be consumed by both approaches . There is a natural balancing function (put any name you wish to it) that has been operating from day one which will eventually bring about some form of stability ; as always . Technology and general understanding are pluses , but man's combined wisdom does not make him significantly less subject to the effects of unanticipated developments than are lower order life forms (there is so much more we don't know than that we do) .  In critical areas of choice , emotion seems to override reason , so with full awareness of that fact I have hope that (in descending order of importance in regard to not unrelated probabilities) : The world population explosion can be stabilized soon and painlessly ; Negotiation will be able to trump armed conflict ; Various forms of disaster can be bypassed during the process of bringing about a situation whereby a world population is willing and able to function effectively using only benign firms of energy production (solar wind etc.) .     
Logged
Dick Roadnight
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1730


« Reply #56 on: April 11, 2011, 03:03:49 AM »
ReplyReply

You will get more radiation
I am glad things are getting back to normal for you in Tokyo, Bernard.

My wife works with someone who lost both parents... but the most significant disaster was not the nuclear incident, nor the quake, but the Tsunami?
Logged

Hasselblad H4, Sinar P3 monorail view camera, Schneider Apo-digitar lenses
marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1722



« Reply #57 on: April 11, 2011, 03:35:39 AM »
ReplyReply

The risk is non-existent. And here I hoped media had already moved to the next Bugaboo Of The Month.

You will get more radiation from the flight itself: there is less atmosphere to protect you from cosmic radiation than at ground level *. Not to mention the "normal" pollution you breath in on the way to the airport, in big part thanks to the most dangerous power production technology which kills more people per year than nuclear power has ever done (including nuclear bombs): coal.

* just realized that's probably not reassuring for someone who carries a dosimeter... The dosage you get from flying planes as a profession is not a significant risk factor.
I wasn't concerned until they pulled our airplanes off line to decontaminate the engines (radiation) and change the HEPA filters (all the air you breath in an aircraft is first ingested in the compressor section of the engine!) No company would cancel flights and perform unnecessary maintenance unless there was a good reason. So for $72 I have 6 dosimeters for 6 months of monitoring. I'll be able to sleep better that way. Marc
ps I agree the increase in radiation that a pilot is exposed to in a career should do no harm I do know some pilots that will not fly above 30,000 ft because of the increased radiation. A bigger concern are the new Xray machines that the US is starting to use they haven't reached Hawaii yet thank God!
« Last Edit: April 11, 2011, 03:39:52 AM by marcmccalmont » Logged

Marc McCalmont
UlfKrentz
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


WWW
« Reply #58 on: April 11, 2011, 04:39:56 PM »
ReplyReply

The risk is non-existent. And here I hoped media had already moved to the next Bugaboo Of The Month.

You will get more radiation from the flight itself: there is less atmosphere to protect you from cosmic radiation than at ground level *. Not to mention the "normal" pollution you breath in on the way to the airport, in big part thanks to the most dangerous power production technology which kills more people per year than nuclear power has ever done (including nuclear bombs): coal.

* just realized that's probably not reassuring for someone who carries a dosimeter... The dosage you get from flying planes as a profession is not a significant risk factor.

The radiation emitted in Japan is serious, far from turning to normality within some weeks. I wonder if youŽll love your cancer like your nukes.

http://theconversation.edu.au/articles/just-in-case-you-missed-it-heres-why-radiation-is-a-health-hazard-315

Logged
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2907

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #59 on: April 11, 2011, 04:55:05 PM »
ReplyReply

The radiation emitted in Japan is serious, far from turning to normality within some weeks. I wonder if youŽll love your cancer like your nukes.

http://theconversation.edu.au/articles/just-in-case-you-missed-it-heres-why-radiation-is-a-health-hazard-315

I skimmed through the article, and all it did include was alarmism and often irrelevant figures, with zero information on the risk Fukushima radiation presents to humans.

Funny (?) thing how they neglected to complete the passage "the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, for instance, has resulted in an epidemic of thyroid cancer with 6,500 children affected so far" with the rather relevant survivability figure: 99%.

Once again: coal kills an order of a magnitude more people than Chernobyl, Three Mile Island and the two nuclear bombs dropped in Japan combined each year.

Keep it coming, I'm not letting the misinformation, disinformation, propaganda and FUD get through here.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2011, 04:57:22 PM by feppe » Logged

Pages: « 1 2 [3] 4 5 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad