Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: New PC advise for Medium Format  (Read 6954 times)
Dave Gurtcheff
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 464


« Reply #20 on: March 28, 2011, 03:04:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Thank you Feppe. I changed the secondary drive (where my files will be) to a 1 TB 7200 "Black", in lieu of 1.5 TB "Green". I don't need the extra space, but do prefer faster read/write times. The primary 500 gb drive will be home to programs.
Thanks again
Dave
Logged
jalcocer
Guest
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2011, 06:33:42 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Dave, was reading your post and I'm glad you are getting a new system. Just a comment, that motherboard from Puget does not come with a 1394 port, nor has a 1394 conector on board, don't know if you already noticed that, or if you are planning to keep using your device with the old pc.

If you intend to use it in the new system you'll need a pci card with some 1394 ports. May I recommend you ask puget about a pci 1394 card for your new system?, if they don't give you that option is not that much of a problem, those cards are really cheap and sold everywhere, and easy to install.

Regards
Logged
Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 760



WWW
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2011, 11:24:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Thanks all here for the help and advice. Several people pointed out I should not be pinching pennies here, as the PC is 1/3 the work flow. I went over my budget a bit, but the folks at Puget Systems have been very prompt and helpful configuring a system for me knowing my end use. What they suggest (copied and pasted from their site, I hope they don't mind) is as follows (comments welcome):

System Core
Motherboard  Asus P8H67-M EVO REV 3.0     
CPU  Intel Core i5 2500K QUAD CORE 3.3GHz 95W   
Ram  Kingston 16GB DDR3-1333 (4x4GB) 
Video Card  XFX Radeon HD 5670 512MB   
 
Storage
Hard Drive  Western Digital Caviar Green 1.5TB

  Comments: Secondary drive.
 
 
 Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB SATA 6 Gb/s

  Comments: Primary drive.
 
   
CD / DVD  Asus 24x DVD-RW Lightscribe SATA (black)   
 
Case / Cooling
Case  Antec Mini P180 (Black)   
Power Supply  Antec TruePower 650W Power Supply   
CPU Cooling  Scythe Katana 3 CPU Cooler   
 
Software
OS  Windows 7 Professional 64-bit OEM SP1   
Software: Security  Microsoft Security Essentials [NO SUPPORT]   
 
Accessories
Services  Warranty: Lifetime Labor, 1 Year Parts

Thanks again for your help
Dave



If you don't mind sharing, what was the price quote for this machine?
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
Steve Weldon
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1445



WWW
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2011, 01:15:51 AM »
ReplyReply

Some of the components are low end, some better.

Will this machine work for image processing?  Yes. 

Could you build a much faster one?  Yes.

Have you priced these parts separately?  If not, try www.newegg.com

Once you do, then you'll know how much you're paying them to put the machine together for you and for their one year warranty.  As already mentioned, many of these parts are warrantied for much longer than 1 year.  The video card for instance is probably 3 years, the hard drives at least 3 and maybe 5.. the motherboard 3 years.  RAM is often lifetime.  Low end power supplies 1 year.. These warranties are all things to weigh when you build your own machine because 'generally' longer warranties indicate a higher quality item. 

Logged

----------------------------------------------
http://www.BangkokImages.com
degrub
Guest
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2011, 07:58:55 AM »
ReplyReply

Here is a way around the driver issue -

http://www.hamrick.com/vuescan/polaroid_sprintscan_120.html

Should be able to get decent results.


Didn't see Bart's earlier post.

Frank
« Last Edit: March 29, 2011, 08:00:35 AM by degrub » Logged
Dave Gurtcheff
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 464


« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2011, 10:31:53 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Dave, was reading your post and I'm glad you are getting a new system. Just a comment, that motherboard from Puget does not come with a 1394 port, nor has a 1394 conector on board, don't know if you already noticed that, or if you are planning to keep using your device with the old pc.

If you intend to use it in the new system you'll need a pci card with some 1394 ports. May I recommend you ask puget about a pci 1394 card for your new system?, if they don't give you that option is not that much of a problem, those cards are really cheap and sold everywhere, and easy to install.

Regards
Hi Jalcocer:
The machine has 4 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0, and firewire ports on the rear along with SATA4; four of these (what are these for?), a SATA 6.0 Gbps: two (Huh?), and a front panel with 2 USB 2.0, audio in, audio out,  and eSATA: one (what is this?).
The quote is $1600.
Thanks again all: very educational process.
Dave
Logged
Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 760



WWW
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2011, 11:23:21 AM »
ReplyReply

Looks like they are charging you 400 bucks, give or take to assemble this machine for you, based on Newegg pricing.  Newegg does not have the exact case or cpu cooler so I priced similar stuff. 

400 bucks would go a long way towards upgrades like an i7 processor for example.  This is a pretty simple build.  I think you could handle it.
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
Steve Weldon
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1445



WWW
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2011, 11:53:57 AM »
ReplyReply

Looks like they are charging you 400 bucks, give or take to assemble this machine for you, based on Newegg pricing.  Newegg does not have the exact case or cpu cooler so I priced similar stuff. 

400 bucks would go a long way towards upgrades like an i7 processor for example.  This is a pretty simple build.  I think you could handle it.
+1  I wanted to say that. 

The company I think is charging him a fair fee considering the warranty, but it's a price he'll have to weigh against his desire to tackle the learning curve of putting one together himself.


Dave -  One more thing you need to be SURE to check on.  Make sure to ask if the motherboard has the latest B3 stepping revision.  When the new Sandy Bridge CPU's first came out the supporting motherboards had issues with their SATA controller chipsets and they ALL had to be replaced or revised at the factory.  It was a huge thing some months back, most likely all current stock is fine but..
Logged

----------------------------------------------
http://www.BangkokImages.com
jalcocer
Guest
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2011, 01:29:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Jalcocer:
The machine has 4 USB 2.0, 2 USB 3.0, and firewire ports on the rear along with SATA4; four of these (what are these for?), a SATA 6.0 Gbps: two (Huh?), and a front panel with 2 USB 2.0, audio in, audio out,  and eSATA: one (what is this?).
The quote is $1600.
Thanks again all: very educational process.
Dave

Hi Dave, well, really good you are getting those firewire. eSata is an external sata port, most of the recent motherboards come with it as well as with the new usb 3.0 along with the usual usb 2.0, some cases even have that port to be connected directly to the motherboard.

In the pc environment eSata began to be used a lot, like firewire 800 is used in the mac environment (the transfer speeds are the same that those allowed by the internal sata ports). There are a lot of external hard drives that today come with both usb and eSata ports, and you'll find a lot of hard drive cases that come with this port too.

REgars
Logged
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2909

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2011, 01:47:54 PM »
ReplyReply

Not really my business, but I can't pass since I'm quite dismayed. The builder who quoted the price worked for it, was in contact with the prospective customer with back-and-forth, took the customer's feedback and adjusted the setup; and now you are encouraging him to build the same computer himself and the builder is left to eat the time and cost it took to get there.

Imagine if a pro architecture photographer was asked to shoot a complicated living room in tough lighting. He'd show the prospective client how he plans to set up the lights, what time of day is best for the shoot, what kind of lens, etc. Then the customer drops him an email that "I'm doing it myself, thanks for the tips."
« Last Edit: March 29, 2011, 01:50:12 PM by feppe » Logged

Steve Weldon
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1445



WWW
« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2011, 03:17:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Not really my business, but I can't pass since I'm quite dismayed. The builder who quoted the price worked for it, was in contact with the prospective customer with back-and-forth, took the customer's feedback and adjusted the setup; and now you are encouraging him to build the same computer himself and the builder is left to eat the time and cost it took to get there.

Imagine if a pro architecture photographer was asked to shoot a complicated living room in tough lighting. He'd show the prospective client how he plans to set up the lights, what time of day is best for the shoot, what kind of lens, etc. Then the customer drops him an email that "I'm doing it myself, thanks for the tips."
I understand your point, but I don't think it's worth getting 'dismayed' over, especially since it's not quite the same thing.

1.  Building a PC is not a specialized skill anymore.  The only equipment needed to assemble a PC is a screwdriver and sometimes not even that.  The knowledge isn't specialized either.  Quite different from the equipment and skill set needed for your analogy.

2.  You really think the PC Builder spent all that much time?  Every business spends a certain amount of time trying to land clients.  I don't know about anyone else, but I freely give information to prospective clients about my competitors.  Only through being educated and knowing what's available (alternatives) will they end up choosing me for the reasons I'd prefer.. which would be why they should hire me knowing the differences.

3.  I think in todays world it's a mistake to feel loyalty to someone just because they've taken the time to give you a quote.  Or conversely expect a prospective client will select you 'only' because you took the time/effort to give them a quote.  If you want their business you'll need to do much better than that.  You'll need to let them know why choosing you is in their best interest, help them feel comfortable with you, and make doing business with you both enjoyable and hassle free.  You'll need to let them know these things better than the next guy, and in such a way that 'building it themselves' is ill advised.  Salesmanship.

The market is much more complex and competitive.  Its the consumers responsibility to obtain several quotes (and you're not going to buy from them all despite the time and effort they took) for any service in such a competitive marketplace.  It's also the consumers responsibility to evaluate alternatives and make the best decision based on their criteria.  When someone comes on a forum requesting advice/help, then that forum becomes part of the decision making process.  And while I'd love for us all here to get a check for offering our learned opinions.. I don't expect to find one in my mailbox anytime soon.

But most of all.. please don't try and tell us we shouldn't offer advice we see in the OP's best interest.  That's totally counterintuitive to a functioning forum where information is shared.  I personally think the OP is doing exactly what he should be doing.  He's gathering information, asking for quotes, and letting someone EARN his business.  If they do then he'll give it to them.  Or maybe he'll evaluate the costs in such a way where he'll decide to build his own.  Either way, the PC builders name/link came from this thread as did our advice.  Exactly what a forum is for.
Logged

----------------------------------------------
http://www.BangkokImages.com
Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 760



WWW
« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2011, 03:51:44 PM »
ReplyReply

Not really my business, but I can't pass since I'm quite dismayed. The builder who quoted the price worked for it, was in contact with the prospective customer with back-and-forth, took the customer's feedback and adjusted the setup; and now you are encouraging him to build the same computer himself and the builder is left to eat the time and cost it took to get there.

Imagine if a pro architecture photographer was asked to shoot a complicated living room in tough lighting. He'd show the prospective client how he plans to set up the lights, what time of day is best for the shoot, what kind of lens, etc. Then the customer drops him an email that "I'm doing it myself, thanks for the tips."

No, I suggested he build his own machine prior to him showing us what a builder suggested. And I suggest he can build a BETTER computer for less money. 

I also freely share my work practices and processes.  My relationship with my clients goes well beyond the specfic workflow for producing the photos.  They hire me for lots of reasons, not just how I might light a certain subject for example.

Now the OP might feel the price is fair, the product satisfactory and the company solid enough to stand by the warranty. He might not what to build it himself.  But he WILL be an informed consumer.  He now has  more options.  Is there a problem with that?
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2909

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2011, 04:35:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Enjoy the race to the bottom.
Logged

Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 760



WWW
« Reply #33 on: March 29, 2011, 05:36:08 PM »
ReplyReply

Enjoy the race to the bottom.

Race to the bottom?  Surely you jest....
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
feppe
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2909

Oh this shows up in here!


WWW
« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2011, 06:14:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Race to the bottom?  Surely you jest....

You haven't read the news in the last 30 years?

Anyway, this is not the time or the place. If you guys see no problem with this, so be it.
Logged

Craig Lamson
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 760



WWW
« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2011, 06:24:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Don't race to the bottom next time you crank out a few prints instead of running down to the local printer....silly.
Logged

Craig Lamson Photo
www.craiglamson.com
BartvanderWolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3440


« Reply #36 on: March 29, 2011, 06:34:32 PM »
ReplyReply

You haven't read the news in the last 30 years?

Anyway, this is not the time or the place. If you guys see no problem with this, so be it.

+1

I'm reasonably comfortable with PC configurations myself, and the various variables available to compose a theoretical system. In practice though, and I've whitnessed it close up, just combining superior components is no guarantee whatsoever that the configuration will actually work (reliably). I've seen that even an experienced electrical engineer can get stuck, just because a memory stick is of the wrong brand, or a motherboard's timing is not optimal, or the latest firmware is not installed, or ...

To recommend such an enterprise to someone less experienced is plainly naive, irresponsible, stupid.

The extra money paid to someone with the responsability of providing a working solution, is well spent.

Cheers,
Bart
Logged
DeanChriss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 268


WWW
« Reply #37 on: March 29, 2011, 06:46:46 PM »
ReplyReply

For what it's worth... I ordered a Core i7-2600 (Intel Sandy Bridge) computer from Puget in late January and got it a short while later, on the very same day everyone found out about Intel's Sandy Bridge recall. Of course this created a hassle, but Puget paid for shipping it back across the country replaced the mother board and I got it back before anyone else was even selling Sandy Bridge PCs again. On top of that, their workmanship is first class, as are their technicians and technical support staff. My day job is as an engineering consultant in the computer field so I could have built this myself, but I'm very glad I did not.
Logged

- Dean
Farmer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1624


WWW
« Reply #38 on: March 29, 2011, 08:41:45 PM »
ReplyReply

I put together ("build: would suggest more to the effort than there ever really is) a PC for the first time around 1996, and before that I happily installed modifications and upgrades to my Amiga.  Before that, dating back to 1980 when I first had a personal computer (Z-80 based), I opened them up for a look, but never did anything to them.

I put together dozens for friends and family and myself over the years - perhaps over a 100 in all.  I long ago gave up doing initial "builds", though.  It's just not worth my time and effort compared to having someone else do it (although the rates around here are about $100- on top of the components).

There are always options to do it cheaper, as with almost anything in life, but it's the after sales support and service that costs you money and, ultimately, is well worth it.

I tend to agree with Bart, although less emphatically :-), that for someone who hasn't done it before and isn't up with the latest info or have a technical background, it can be quite a drama (it can also go surprisingly well, as I've seen many times) - but it's always a risk.

For a commercial/business use, it's almost always worth paying a little extra for piece of mind - at least at the beginning.
Logged

jalcocer
Guest
« Reply #39 on: March 29, 2011, 08:44:24 PM »
ReplyReply

For what it's worth... I ordered a Core i7-2600 (Intel Sandy Bridge) computer from Puget in late January and got it a short while later, on the very same day everyone found out about Intel's Sandy Bridge recall. Of course this created a hassle, but Puget paid for shipping it back across the country replaced the mother board and I got it back before anyone else was even selling Sandy Bridge PCs again. On top of that, their workmanship is first class, as are their technicians and technical support staff. My day job is as an engineering consultant in the computer field so I could have built this myself, but I'm very glad I did not.

He is right, it is a really huge weight of your back to have the certainty that if something goes wrong, the vendor is going to replace it, and that the assembly is made by people who really knows their business. It is true that you could save a lot of money building it your self, but me, being a computer builder here in Mexico where we are not that ahead (mainly because people dont want to spend), sometimes I have so much trouble when there is some compatibility issues with something that on paper should work together.

You should check also digitalstormonline.com, they have really good systems, huge gamer market but also sell systems for other type of customer, maybe have good price in something similar, you may also try velocity micro, by experience with some people I know that own both brands is good, about a price comparisson I couldn't tell you, but I understand those three vendors (including puget) are really really good.

Regards
Logged
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad