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Author Topic: Burr Tral in Capitol Reef  (Read 6324 times)
howard smith
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« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2004, 04:19:14 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']It failed again, same way.  It must be me.  I've always had trouble with that .edu thing.  Anyway, thanks for the try.  I hope you liked it 'cause I'm on my way.  UVSC.  Sounds like you may be a "local."[/font]
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howard smith
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« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2004, 04:10:31 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']I just got back from Utah this hile I was there, I drove from Bull Frog Marina to Boulder, then from Boulder to Capitol Reef NP headquarters.  Of the entire drive, I really liked the the section from the Deer Creek campgound east to the top of the switchbacks.  About 11 miles of canyon with shear red sandstone cliffs.  Lots of trees in the canyon.  Spent a lot of time there and got a god shot.

My sons and I tried the Wave but backed down due to heavy thunderstorms for several days.  We saved the tri with Lower Antelope.  My sons had never been there but had seen my photos.  We had a grand time there.

Which do I like better?  Utah or the Sierra.  For sure.  No comparison.  (I like the one I am visiting.)  All in all, I find it a bit easier to find solitude in Utah.  As crowed as Antelpoe gets, the Muir Trail seems like an LA freeway.  I'm sure glad now I "did" the Appilacian Train in the 50's.[/font]
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gtal
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« Reply #22 on: August 27, 2004, 09:12:37 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Yeah, well, when in Utah I avoid Antelope and when in the Sierra I avoid the Muir Trail as much as possible.

Which is just as well since Antelope is in Arizona
The JMT is over 220 miles long, and having walked the whole length of it I know that other than a few "popular" spots, solitude can easily be found in many places after a couple of day's hiking. It's interesting to me to see these statements on various forums and I always wonder how these rumors get started.

Guy[/font]
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Scenic Wild Photography
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howard smith
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« Reply #23 on: August 27, 2004, 11:52:04 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']gtal, I didn't mean that the Muir is bumper-to-bumper.  It is I have never gone a day without company of some kind, and most on-trail camping areas will have company.  I frequently would leave the trail a 1/2 mile or so to camp or have a long lunch break and never see a soul.

The San Fafael Swell was lonesome.  Saw one car the first day, and two the second day.  There was a little more traffic as I got near Boulder, but much was local.

The Wave (Coyote Butte North area) is regulated so crowds are not a prblem unless all 10 of you get to the same place at the same time.[/font]
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b.e.wilson
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« Reply #24 on: August 28, 2004, 12:19:24 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']I've also noticed that the aspen in that area seem to be of many different specimen, so they do not all turn together. Last year I saw neighboring stands, one had already dropped it's leaves, the other just starting to turn. More variation there than anywhere else I've seen. The north end of Skyline Drive (Tucker to Highway 31) has the least variation in my experience.

About the confusion between the reefs down there, I'm still unsure how the three major reefs relate to each other. The North Cainville/Cainville reef seems to be a continuation of the San Rafael Reef (the Muddy has split them), but San Rafael is a dome (the reef is one side of the dome), while the Cainville reefs are monoclines (steps resulting from deep faulting), so they can't be of the same origin. The Waterpocket Fold is also a monocline, but it runs in a different direction (NW to SE) than the other reefs (NE to SW). Thing is, the San Rafael Reef looks a lot like the Waterpocket Fold, both having "teeth" of Navajo sandstone and "gums" of Carmel formation as a major feature, so it's easy to confuse them.

Anyway, the problem I found on Boulder Mountain (that you'll likely not have on Hell's Backbone) is vantage points for large fall vistas. Boulder Mountain is great for medium scenic shots of aspen, but since it's a single cone it offers no good views of aspen on an opposite slope. Maybe there are some on top, or on the western side, but I haven't been there.

The best Fall scenics I've seen are the cottonwood at the bottom of the canyons (especially Long Canyon on the Burr Trail) that turn late october/early November.[/font]
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