Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 2 [3] 4 5 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: New Camera To Print video–what do you want?  (Read 10929 times)
Les Sparks
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 204


WWW
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2011, 07:40:01 PM »
ReplyReply

I would like to see something about how to recognize when something has gone wrong and how to troubleshoot the C2P process to see where I've messed up. Perhaps  demonstrate common problems--poor sharpening, banding, plugged nozzles, color management failure. Many of us make a print that just doesn't quite look as good as we think it should, but don't know how to determine if we messed up sharpening, profile choice, or whatever.

Also since Michael so highly recommended the xrite ColorChecker Passport it would be nice to have a discussion of how to make best use of it in the C2P workflow.
Les
Logged

Steve House
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 223


« Reply #41 on: April 17, 2011, 07:25:43 AM »
ReplyReply

I also second the suggestion for in-depth discussion on what makes a proper print and how to evaluate them.  Many people have never actually seen an original exhibition Fine Print made by a darkroom or printing Master and have no visual memory of what is possible against which to judge their own work, a situation made even worse today with the demise of the chemical darkroom.  For many, a 'photograph' is a jpeg viewed on a monitor and physical prints are relatively rare.  I remember back in the day, Fred Picker offered some hand-printed B&W reference prints of a few typical scenes through his Zone VI catalog, expressly for the purpose of allowing one to see what a full-range fine print actually looked like in real life.  Not quite sure how one might accomplish the same thing in a video, especially since what the viewer will see on his screen is as dependent on his hardware and its setup as it is on what the filmmaker does on his end but an in-depth discussion of the evaluation of the artistic and technical qualities of a print would certainly be welcome.
Logged
Adam L
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 182


WWW
« Reply #42 on: April 17, 2011, 07:54:39 AM »
ReplyReply

I always wish I had the your custom settings available for my use.  I would love access to your most important custom LR Presets, your favorite photoshop actions, custom brushes & print profiles...those customized tools you use repeatedly in your workflow process.   A companion set of download files as it relates to the C2P discussion topics would help me get the most out of these lessons.

I would like a document that lists all of the vendors mentioned in the videos.  I know I took notes as I watched the first version - it would be so nice to have crib notes pre-printed as I watched the videos.

I have been reading through your Ultimate Workshop book with Martin Evening and have been so impressed with the content.   It brings home the need to fully visualize a project - how PS and image capture should work together.   While this book is technical it also served as a source for creative inspiration!  Well done.
Logged

"That's a lot of money to move a few pixels around"
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6880


WWW
« Reply #43 on: April 17, 2011, 08:08:01 AM »
ReplyReply

I also second the suggestion for in-depth discussion on what makes a proper print and how to evaluate them.  Many people have never actually seen an original exhibition Fine Print made by a darkroom or printing Master and have no visual memory of what is possible against which to judge their own work, a situation made even worse today with the demise of the chemical darkroom.  For many, a 'photograph' is a jpeg viewed on a monitor and physical prints are relatively rare.  I remember back in the day, Fred Picker offered some hand-printed B&W reference prints of a few typical scenes through his Zone VI catalog, expressly for the purpose of allowing one to see what a full-range fine print actually looked like in real life.  Not quite sure how one might accomplish the same thing in a video, especially since what the viewer will see on his screen is as dependent on his hardware and its setup as it is on what the filmmaker does on his end but an in-depth discussion of the evaluation of the artistic and technical qualities of a print would certainly be welcome.

I think even in video format one can go a long way to describing and showing the attributes of what makes a fine print; in the final analysis, however, there really is no substitute for going to good galleries and seeing some. What the video can do is instruct people on what to look for as markers of print quality.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
walter.sk
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1328


« Reply #44 on: April 17, 2011, 09:42:57 AM »
ReplyReply

I use an out-of-the-box print viewer with variable brightness and I am comfortable with it and can depend on the results.  But what I would like to see in the CM section of a new video would be some visual examples of setups using Solux lamps, also adjusted for brightness by distance from the prints.  If possible, show examples from the shoestring budget level to the more sophisticated, and what they look like in use.

I'm on the board of a very large camera club with many people interested in color management, and if something like the above were included they would be eager to purchase a DVD or download it when it comes out.
Logged
digitaldog
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8776



WWW
« Reply #45 on: April 17, 2011, 11:47:01 AM »
ReplyReply

I use an out-of-the-box print viewer with variable brightness and I am comfortable with it and can depend on the results.  But what I would like to see in the CM section of a new video would be some visual examples of setups using Solux lamps, also adjusted for brightness by distance from the prints. 

And how one needs to calibrate the display for either/both, the advantage of having a display system that allows one to load on the fly, either when appropriate (something one can easily do with SpectraView).

You have a printer profile, you use it to soft proof. It has two tables (one for output, one for soft proof). There’s a disconnect (common). Do you (and how do you) ‘fix’ this using the custom display calibration, do you edit the preview portion of the profile?
Logged

Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
Alan Goldhammer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1616


WWW
« Reply #46 on: April 17, 2011, 01:55:05 PM »
ReplyReply

I also second the suggestion for in-depth discussion on what makes a proper print and how to evaluate them.  Many people have never actually seen an original exhibition Fine Print made by a darkroom or printing Master and have no visual memory of what is possible against which to judge their own work, a situation made even worse today with the demise of the chemical darkroom.  For many, a 'photograph' is a jpeg viewed on a monitor and physical prints are relatively rare.  I remember back in the day, Fred Picker offered some hand-printed B&W reference prints of a few typical scenes through his Zone VI catalog, expressly for the purpose of allowing one to see what a full-range fine print actually looked like in real life.  Not quite sure how one might accomplish the same thing in a video, especially since what the viewer will see on his screen is as dependent on his hardware and its setup as it is on what the filmmaker does on his end but an in-depth discussion of the evaluation of the artistic and technical qualities of a print would certainly be welcome.
Actually what Michael and Jeff could do is distribute one or more JPEGs that are full developed and sharpened so that users can print these out on their own printers to see what the print looks like (they could also distribute some less than perfect prints (though for Jeff that would be quite hard as it goes against his grain) for comparison).  I don't think that anyone will get an understanding from watching a video clip because of the limitations of the filming and display.  Just a thought as I've received a free image from Ronny Nielsen who posts to LuLa and it was quite nice when I printed it out.
Logged

Gemmtech
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 526


« Reply #47 on: April 17, 2011, 02:34:04 PM »
ReplyReply

I apologize for not reading the entire thread, but I think taking different types of images from camera to print would be nice.  I mean step by step, take a photo of a person, process it and then print it, do a landscape, a sunset, architecture, water, a beach scene, art reproduction etc.  show all the adjustments from camera to print and then print the image.  I agree with Alan, maybe allow us to download some images you have completed showing the steps involved to get there.  Naturally they would be images with little or no value (everybody has one, right? :-) ) 
Logged
Steve House
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 223


« Reply #48 on: April 17, 2011, 02:52:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Actually what Michael and Jeff could do is distribute one or more JPEGs that are full developed and sharpened so that users can print these out on their own printers to see what the print looks like (they could also distribute some less than perfect prints (though for Jeff that would be quite hard as it goes against his grain) for comparison).  I don't think that anyone will get an understanding from watching a video clip because of the limitations of the filming and display.  Just a thought as I've received a free image from Ronny Nielsen who posts to LuLa and it was quite nice when I printed it out.

Problem with that is the optimum print is made from a file tailored to the specific printer/ink/paper combination that is used to print it.  No way could they send a jpg that would print the same on my printer as it prints on theirs, unless we happen to have absolutely identical setups.  The only way to do that would be to send both a paper fine print and the original source file so the user could attempt to duplicate the print result on his own setup.  Of course that might not be out of the question - there's no reason they couldn't offer an actual physical reference print delivered by snail mail at some nominal cost, along with a download of the unprocessed original source file.
Logged
natas
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 256


« Reply #49 on: April 17, 2011, 02:53:05 PM »
ReplyReply

I would like to see you guys explain how you cut prints. A nice discussion on what resolution to send to a printer and your thoughts on that. Often times I struggle with uprezzing in fractals or just sending the file to the printer and letting it Ypres.

I agree with others saying color management talk would be great. I struggled with dark prints for years before I got it right.

Advanced topics you could discuss like the options on Epson printers for color density, and the proper paper to choose when making custom profiles with non third party papers.
Logged
Alan Goldhammer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1616


WWW
« Reply #50 on: April 17, 2011, 02:59:36 PM »
ReplyReply

Problem with that is the optimum print is made from a file tailored to the specific printer/ink/paper combination that is used to print it.  No way could they send a jpg that would print the same on my printer as it prints on theirs, unless we happen to have absolutely identical setups.  The only way to do that would be to send both a paper fine print and the original source file so the user could attempt to duplicate the print result on his own setup.  Of course that might not be out of the question - there's no reason they couldn't offer an actual physical reference print delivered by snail mail at some nominal cost, along with a download of the unprocessed original source file.
To make it simple they merely need to sharpen for gloss paper (this would encompass most of what all of us print) and let the end use pick the particular brand of paper, profile and printer setting.  I can think of no easier way to do this.  I don't think Michael and Jeff want to set up a print shop just to send out sample prints; there are enough sources (including many members of LuLa) where one can purchase quality prints.  For teaching purposes, the JPEG approach makes sense.
Logged

Andrew Makiejewski
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64


WWW
« Reply #51 on: April 17, 2011, 09:13:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Lots of good thing to be covered have already been mentioned. A big one for myself would be more detail and examples on tweaking the images so they print what we see on screen. Curves tweaks, saturation and so on.

Well back to packing as I am moving at the ens of the month. So much to be done yet.

Andrew
Logged

Capture the moment.
Rocco Penny
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 482



« Reply #52 on: April 20, 2011, 09:49:34 AM »
ReplyReply

there's another thing that seems to be a pressing concern for so many of us;
work space-
table, chair, desk, storage, environmental conditions etc.
Hope this isn't too late or too esoteric Smiley
Logged
KeithR
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 630


« Reply #53 on: April 20, 2011, 05:56:05 PM »
ReplyReply

A section on the latest advances in Black and White printing.

I'd 2nd this and would even have Mr Eric(madman)Chan discuss his soft proofing technique with ABW in the Epson printers.
Logged

The destination is our goal but it’s the journey that educates us.
lausanne
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


« Reply #54 on: April 23, 2011, 08:29:06 PM »
ReplyReply

Yes, black and white printing issues - please.

Maybe impossible but, as above - an overview of how much is enough on various equipment levels. Which level of printer, level/specs of monitor, etc. per level of intent.  Like, some kind of matrix showing as many variables as possible.  (Now there's a project for someone.)

And, I can't wait for this!  The first was so helpful.

Will this have to be a stand-alone effort?  Or could you build it assuming folks already had the first set of videos?  That might be risky from a marketing standpoint but it seems a shame to have to repeat the parts that still stand.  Like a "Volume II" ?
Logged
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1899



« Reply #55 on: April 24, 2011, 07:05:13 AM »
ReplyReply

Will this have to be a stand-alone effort?  Or could you build it assuming folks already had the first set of videos?  That might be risky from a marketing standpoint but it seems a shame to have to repeat the parts that still stand.  Like a "Volume II" ?

Yes, C2P-2 will be stand-alone: a complete re-do of most of what was covered in C2P. Some things have changed, some not. However as is the way with our fairly freeform approach, I am certain that there will be different styles of approach to many of the topics that are unchanged.

Also, recognizing the great support the original C2P received from customers - it remains our biggest seller - there will be a healthy discount offered buyers of C2P-2 who already own the original.

Many thanks to all who have contributed to this thread - it is invaluable.

Chris

PS No repeat of old shirts is anticipated...
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #56 on: April 24, 2011, 03:51:04 PM »
ReplyReply

I often deliver my larger pieces directly to buyers' homes and workplaces.  I am constantly struck by how dismal the lighting is in many of those places!  Solux bulbs are NOT common in the field.  Might be useful to touch on how to "punt" in processing for those kinds of situations.  No easy task.

And dare I recommend some discussion on the presentation of photographs in the context of decor?  Photographers seem to have a willing blind-side to that really very important topic which has a big effect on sales.

Also, is there is a checkbox somewhere in the printing dialogue that will turn my boring, pedantic images into prize-winning best-sellers?  If so please cover it in exquisite detail.  Haven't been able to find it.


Logged
Schewe
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 5453


WWW
« Reply #57 on: April 24, 2011, 06:55:03 PM »
ReplyReply

Also, is there is a checkbox somewhere in the printing dialogue that will turn my boring, pedantic images into prize-winning best-sellers?  If so please cover it in exquisite detail.

Alas...no. There is however a button in the soft proof viewing conditions to make your image look like "crap". Maybe somebody could come up with an inverse :~)
Logged
SiddharthMalik
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2


« Reply #58 on: May 03, 2011, 03:20:22 AM »
ReplyReply

I would also request for "the art of upres" be covered in detail. Though Mr. Schewe has written a very good detailed article I do believe that it could do with updating.

Also there are several software options available..I do hope that some comparisons can be made with alternates to bicubic smoother and give your suggestions on best practice

Thanks and really look forward to the new C-P video

Siddharth
Logged
gdi
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13


« Reply #59 on: May 03, 2011, 06:49:16 AM »
ReplyReply

I never purchased the first video -but I could use the help!  Should I wait for the second, or is the first still valuable after all these years ? Smiley  (Also, how much money would I save by waiting for the second?)

Thanks
Logged
Pages: « 1 2 [3] 4 5 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad