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Author Topic: Review: Peter Lik App for iPhone and iPad  (Read 18361 times)
Anders_HK
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« on: April 18, 2011, 07:38:01 AM »
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Sheer inspiration on 532 pages (iPhone version)

For those who do not know of Peter Lik he is likely the most successful and skillful landscape photographer of our time and have a string of galleries across USA and in Australia where he is from. I first saw his work on a visit to his gallery in Cairns, Australia when I voyaged round the world in 2003. I was very impressed then and I remain so of his work today. His work is truly inspirational and top notch.

At first the interface felt a tad tedious, only to realize that it gave me the large format print size feel on my iPhone. Yes, in fact it felt so. I mean.. first each page shows a book page spread at smaller size than the iPhone screen, click a button that gives option to read text or zoom page to full screen size and to zoom in further... just to realize that this is the way I would look at his images printed in a gallery, first full size... then walk in closer and look at details and parts of image, read text, step back again...

Add together the text written to many of his images, and the chapter text, this app is a true inspiration and has been great on my daily commute. The iPhone version has 532 full spreads and I have been through all of them by end of today. Time to re-start, will read it again... gaze at his images like in a gallery on my tiny display  Grin. Nothing short of sheer and true inspiration with so many excellent images from his work. It also lends itself well to teach from his images in how he sees, and as such feels like a tremendous resource.

I can warmly recommend it.  Wink

Regards
Anders
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2011, 11:23:09 AM »
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For those who do not know of Peter Lik he is likely the most successful and skillful landscape photographer of our time

Yeah, I'll agree with the first part, but the second is pretty debatable.  

Exhibit A:



I would expect that "the most skillful landscape photographer of our time" would be able to make a photograph that is sufficiently sharp.  I would expect that he could get a straight horizon line in a photograph.   I would also expect that he would not clip the foreground rocks either.  There a many people on this forum that I know that could have made this photo or one even better had they been at that location at the same time.  

Peter Lik is a great marketer, his skills as a photographer less so....

For truly talented landscape photographers of our time see Tom Till, Ian Plant and Michale Fatali


« Last Edit: April 18, 2011, 11:27:29 AM by Lonnie Utah » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2011, 12:07:49 PM »
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Ditto, marketing is very important. An average photographer can seem great if you measure just by sales figures and fans. Lik spends a ton of cash promoting himself.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2011, 12:14:47 PM »
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Ahhhmm... Sour grapes, anyone?
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Slobodan

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« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2011, 12:16:26 PM »
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No sour ones here - mine are very sweet! Those are just the facts of life - lots of money is the key to this guy. And now that some really big money is behind him, no telling....
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feppe
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« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2011, 12:49:55 PM »
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Yeah, I'll agree with the first part, but the second is pretty debatable.  

Exhibit A:

Reminds me of this classic TOP post.
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Tim Gray
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« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2011, 01:22:46 PM »
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2 things I do like about Peter Lik - he prints BIG and (at least the galleries he has in Las Vegas - I assume it's consistent everywhere) his presentation of the images is very compelling - you'd swear they were backlit.  Fuji Crystal Archive - silver halide, not inkjet,  if I remember correctly.
 
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2011, 02:28:19 PM »
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Ahhhmm... Sour grapes, anyone?

Not at all, it's just my opinion.  If you disagree, why not prove me wrong?  I will 100% stand by what I say.  Peter Lik is the most marketed photographer of our time.  Good on him for that.  I don't begrudge anyone success.  

However, he is nowhere near the best.  In fact, I've see lots of stuff by amateurs that I personally think is 1) Better composed and 2) better processed than some of Peter Lik's work (see the example above & below).  As much as I've seen you make negative comment towards over saturated photograhs here, I'm surprised you haven't mentioned it in this case, because most of his are just that. His work is "unique" in the fact that he shoots with a 6x17 format camera and lots of folks aren't use to that perspective.  So it's unusual in that respect and that catches people eye.

Exhibit B:
http://my.pho.to/peterlik/s2/albums/35_mm_photography_ofpeter_lik_/fs_30.jpg

If you are going to take this photo and sell it as fine art, they why in the world do you clip the light beam at the bottom and leave the bird's nest with the poop running down of the side of the rock still in the upper right of the frame?  (It's much more evident in the photo on his new gallery) These are compositional basics.  

I'm not saying I don't like all of his work.  Some of it I like very much, but "the best"?  No way.  Somebody has taken a TALL drink of the cool-aid.  
« Last Edit: April 18, 2011, 02:46:04 PM by Lonnie Utah » Logged
sailronin
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2011, 03:37:19 PM »
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As a photography student I was told.."If you can't make it good, make it big. If that doesn't work, frame it."

Lik's work is good and certainly eye catching, he is the most commercially viable fine art (landscape) photographer to date, is he the best?  Well, his work is really big.....
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2011, 04:07:13 PM »
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... he is nowhere near the best...

The OP used the term "likely the most... skillful", a relativized statement in itself (note the "likely" part). Nobody said he is the best (and good luck agreeing on the definition of the best).

Quote
... In fact, I've see lots of stuff by amateurs that I personally think is 1) Better composed and 2) better processed than some of Peter Lik's work (see the example above & below).

I have no doubt that might be the case. I have no doubt that someone, somewhere, managed to produce a single shot (or even a few) that is superior to a single shot of another photographer (especially if you are allowed to cherry pick the best from the former and the worst from the latter). There is a bunch of Ansel Adams shots that anyone with a phone camera these days could replicate and perhaps even better it. What ultimately counts is a body of work.

Quote
... As much as I've seen you make negative comment towards over saturated photograhs here, I'm surprised you haven't mentioned it in this case...

Because I was not trying to defend that particular photo. I actually totally agree with your technical assessment and I do not like either photo in your examples. The first one is especially ugly. But note that is just my/your opinion... if enough people think otherwise (and apparently they do), and these shots keep selling, all we can do is to lament the existence of "poor, uneducated masses".

At the risk of repeating myself (from an earlier, unrelated post), I once talked to a photographer with a gallery in one of the most prominent spots in a major American metropolis (and obviously selling enough to support the location). I mentioned to him that one of his landscapes/seascapes has a particularly nasty case of chroma noise, obvious from a mile to any photographer. His reply? That was one of his best-sellers, he said, and one of the buyers explained that as "reminding him of impressionistic/pointillistic palette". Non-photographers definitely use different criteria that we do, much more skewed toward emotional impact vs. technical merits.

And I am perfectly aware that my comments (as well as yours or anyone else's) run the risk that is very nicely described in the TOP link, as provided by Harry (feppe) above.

I have to admit I do not know much about Peter Lik and have not seen much (if any) of his work (I think I walked into one of his galleries once, in Miami, just before they were closing for the evening). But I do know there are others (lots of them) willing to fork out some serious money for his work, so there must be something in it. And that "something" probably has to do with how non-photographers appreciate photography, as mentioned above.


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Slobodan

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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2011, 05:20:17 PM »
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At the risk of repeating myself (from an earlier, unrelated post), I once talked to a photographer with a gallery in one of the most prominent spots in a major American metropolis (and obviously selling enough to support the location). I mentioned to him that one of his landscapes/seascapes has a particularly nasty case of chroma noise, obvious from a mile to any photographer. His reply? That was one of his best-sellers, he said, and one of the buyers explained that as "reminding him of impressionistic/pointillistic palette". Non-photographers definitely use different criteria that we do, much more skewed toward emotional impact vs. technical merits.

And that's the key: it doesn't matter what photographers think of his work, since photographers are not his target audience. He is in the business of selling photographs, and is presumably very very good at that; apparently that concept is alien or even offensive to many (not only on LL).
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Anders_HK
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« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2011, 09:31:15 PM »
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The OP used the term "likely the most... skillful", a relativized statement in itself (note the "likely" part). Nobody said he is the best (and good luck agreeing on the definition of the best).

Correct, I used the term "likely the most... skillful" as a means of recognizing that fine art is in the eye of the beholder and that such views can differ...

As for my personal view I do find Peter Lik to be the by far best at fine art landscapes of our lifetime. There is something fresh and alive in his images and they provoke a feeling and artistic brilliance I do not experience in the work by others.

I also find Peter's processing exceptional and in some images it reminds me of the style to bring out landscapes as that of the Hudson River School of painters.

As I mentioned in above I saw his work already in 2003 in Cairns, Australia. That was at a time when possibly that was his only gallery and when he obvious was not making same $$$. Nor did he at such time have the string of awards and recognition for his photos and photography that he now has. Obvious something has happened since. Peter was good back in 2003, very good, and has since managed to continue to produce much quality works and continued to do so after his move to the "land of capitalism". In above posts it appears some obvious see something wrong with that. So… I gather what we should do is to educate people what pixel peeping is and what is correct way to capture a photo??? Or… is it actually the perception by ordinary and skilled arts collectors that counts? B.t.w. the app also states that two of his older photos were sold at Sothebys… so I gather by that fact that the pixel peeping must be the correct approach??? Smiley


@ Lonnie Utah;

One should be very careful making such strong remarks without sound backing…

First rule in arts: learn the rules.
Second rule: break them within reason of your own artistic view.

 
Exhibit A:

And… why should all photos be sharp? Pixel peeping? Or is there a written rule we must all obey??? The point is artistic vision. I rather like that photo. Not sure I would produce the same… but it conveys a feeling. Sharp? Does it have to be??? I gather soft focus lenses of 19th century are thus wrong also… or are those also about feeling and art? Smiley

While I personally strive for horizontal horizons this image does come across as somehow impressive. I had to think awhile when I first saw it, but it passes by my book. I like it. It reminds of a painting.

I do like this one, and very much. I find it spectacular, fabulous composition, view and to convey a tremendous feeling. My focus when viewing it is not looking for poop in pixels in corners… but the view and impression it makes on me… art is about the feeling it envokes… and far more than poop… Smiley

 
For truly talented landscape photographers of our time see Tom Till, Ian Plant and Michale Fatali

Thanks for showing those. I know of Michale Fitali who is very good but I find his images to lack response of life and feeling in me. My admiration is far more for Jack Dykinga’s images that I find evoke feeling, but not at the same level as Peter Lik’s. I believe you already guessed that my personal view is that Peter Lik blows them both out of the water? Albeit I was not familiar with the other two you linked I do not find their work pleasing at all as fine art landscapes.

As a photography student I was told.."If you can't make it good, make it big. If that doesn't work, frame it."


Let us remember, when make larger, the mistakes shows loud and clear as larger… however… at same time it is a totally different experience in viewing an image, just as I described as of viewing and reading the app. In regards to panoramic vs. 4x5 or 4:3 there is also the format factor. Panoramic images can be totally striking, but it takes something in arriving to make them become such… or else they are not good at all…

Alright, some do not like Elvis or Michael Jackson. Art is in the beholder… yet what I given you folks is information of that I found this application to be a sheer inspiration. It is to me. My post was thinking it can be to bunch of you here also. I warmly recommend this app.

Regards
Anders
« Last Edit: April 18, 2011, 09:35:53 PM by Anders_HK » Logged
NashvilleMike
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« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2011, 11:24:41 PM »
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I'm also of the opinion that Peter Lik is a world-class marketer, but, frankly, a rather pedestrian landscape photographer.

He's not bad by any means and has produced some nice images, but IMO he's FAR from being in the same league as Art Wolfe, David Muench, Carr Clifton, Jack Dykinga, the late/great Galen Rowell, Tom Till, or even some of the more unheard of guys like Jon Ortner, and probably a lot more names that escape me at this hour.

Overall, to be characteristically blunt, I just am not that impressed with him; neither his work, nor with his somewhat arrogant attitude he seems to display on his TV specials.

-m
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« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2011, 01:16:02 AM »
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And that's the key: it doesn't matter what photographers think of his work, since photographers are not his target audience. He is in the business of selling photographs, and is presumably very very good at that; apparently that concept is alien or even offensive to many (not only on LL).

+1!
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Anders_HK
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« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2011, 03:39:39 AM »
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+1!

I cannot help but to think... was not also Ansel Adams at his time?? but... he also taught us photographers a whole bunch...   Wink
« Last Edit: April 19, 2011, 03:49:00 AM by Anders_HK » Logged
sailronin
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« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2011, 07:51:41 AM »
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"Overall, to be characteristically blunt, I just am not that impressed with him; neither his work, nor with his somewhat arrogant attitude he seems to display on his TV specials."



I enjoy his work, just would not put in the same league as Weston (Edward or Brett), Adams, Wolfe or some of the others mentioned in this thread. He is a MASTER at marketing his work, supplying what his fans desire and crafting an image for media.  Showing up on TV interviews in his "outback hat" and cutoff vest seems a bit over the top, but that's what his fans expect. I've never met Mr. Lik but his "persona" on air does seem very "crafted" for effect.

Ansel Adams was a gifted educator as well as photographer and even when reviewing student work was not condescending or dismissive.
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2011, 11:31:43 AM »
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One should be very careful making such strong remarks without sound backing…

It's my opinion, and I think that I provided ample evidence to back up my opinion.  I personally wouldn't include the two photos I highlighted in my own portfolio.  

I will say it again.  Peter Lik is a great marketer.  He succeeds not because of his skills as a photographer, but he has targeted famous high end clients and because of his over the top personality.  I'm not saying he doesn't have any skill, I'm saying that there are many other lesser known (to the general public) photographers that are WAY more talented than Mr. Lik.  It seems that a majority of the respondents agreed with my point of view.  

Albeit I was not familiar with the other two you linked I do not find their work pleasing at all as fine art landscapes.

You haven't heard of Tom Till or Ian Plant?? This kind of gets to my point.  How many other photographers work do you really know?  You might think Hershey's chocolate is really great, if you've never tasted any other brands...

You like Lik's work, good for you.  I'm not a fan.  Those are our opinions, and by nature, opinions are neither right nor wrong.  

Edit:  Here is an un-comprehensive list of other great landscape photographers, each having their own merits and faults....

Aaron Reed - http://aaronreedphotography.photoshelter.com/
Adam Barker - http://www.adambarkerphotography.com/
Adam Burton - http://www.adamburtonphotography.com/
Adam Clutterbuck - http://www.adamclutterbuck.com/
Adam Salwanowicz - http://www.panoramio.com/user/588149
Alain Briot - http://alainbriot.com/
Alain Proust - http://www.alainproust.com/Artist.as...&Akey=H5XCHM8A
Alex Nail - http://www.alexnail.com/
Andris Apse - http://www.nzlandscapes.co.nz/
Andris Apse - www.andrisapse.com
Andy Mumford - www.andymumford.com
Ansel Adams - http://www.anseladams.com
Antony Spencer - http://www.antonyspencer.com/
Art Wolfe - www.artwolfe.com
Ben Jacobsen - http://www.benjacobsenphoto.com/
Bill Hatcher - http://www.billhatcher.com/
Bob Hudak - www.bobhudak.com
Bruce Dale - http://www.brucedale.com/
Bruce Hucko - http://www.brucehuckophoto.com/
Camille Seaman - http://www.camilleseaman.com/
Carr Clifton - http://www.carrclifton.com/
Charles Cramer - http://www.charlescramer.com/
Charlie Waite - www.charliewaite.com
Chip Phillips - http://www.chipphillipsphotography.com/
Chris Friel - http://www.chrisfriel.co.uk/
Christian Fletcher - http://www.christianfletcher.com.au/
Christophe Carlier - http://www.christophecarlier.com/
Christopher Burkett - http://www.christopherburkett.com/
Colin Prior - http://www.colinprior.co.uk/
Cristal De Givre - http://www.cristaldegivre.com/
Dan Baumbach - http://www.timelesslight.com/
Daryl Benson - http://www.darylbenson.com/
David and Marc Muench - http://www.muenchphotography.com/
David Burdeny - www.davidburdeny.com/
David Clapp - http://www.davidclapp.co.uk/
David Fokos - http://www.davidfokos.net/
David Langan - http://www.thenorthlight.co.uk/
David Noton - http://www.davidnoton.com/
David Tolcher - http://www.davidtolcher.co.uk/
David Ward - http://www.into-the-light.com/
Dennis Frates - http://www.fratesphoto.com/
Everton Mcduff - http://www.macduffeverton.com/
Fran Halsall - http://www.fran-halsall.co.uk/
Galen Rowel - www.mountainlight.com
Garry Brannigan - http://www.garrybrannigan.com/
Geoff Ross - http://www.geoffrossphotography.com/
George Lepp - http://www.georgelepp.com/
gordon wiltsie - http://www.alpenimage.com/
Guy Edwardes - http://www.guyedwardes.com/
Guy Tal - http://guytal.com/
Helen Dixon - http://www.helendixonphotography.co.uk/
Iain Sajeant - http://www.iainsarjeant.com/
Ian Cameron - http://www.transientlight.co.uk
Ian Plant - http://ianplant.com/
Jack dykinga - www.dykinga.com
James Kay - http://www.jameskay.com/
Jay Patel - http://www.jaypatelphotography.com/
Jeff Jones - http://lumnos.com/
Jeff Swanson - http://www.interfacingnature.com/
Jeff Vanuga - http://www.jeffvanuga.com/
Jeremy Walker - http://www.jeremywalker.co.uk/
Jim Brandenburg - http://www.jimbrandenburg.com
Jim Clark - http://www.jimclarkphoto.com/
Jim Paterson - http://www.jimpattersonphotography.com/
joe cornish - www.joecornish.com
John Greenwood - http://www.exposingbeauty.co.uk
John Sexton - http://www.johnsexton.com/
John Shaw - http://www.johnshawphoto.com/
Jon Gibbs - http://www.jon-gibbs.co.uk/
Jon Cornforth - http://www.cornforthimages.com/
Josef Hoflehner - http://www.josefhoflehner.com/
Kah Kit Yoong - http://www.magichourtravelscapes.com/
Keith Aggett - http://www.keithaggettphotography.com/
Ken Duncan - http://www.kenduncan.com/
Ken Schory - http://www.kenschory.com/
Kennan Ward - http://www.kennanward.com/
Kevin Mcneal - http://kevinmcnealphotography.com/
Lee Frost - http://www.leefrost.co.uk/
Maciej Duczynski - http://www.lonelywolf.pl/
Marc Adamus - www.marcadamus.com
Marcin Bera - http://www.marcinbera.com/
Mark Denton - http://www.markdentonphotographic.co.uk/
Mark Gray - http://www.markgray.com.au/
Mark Voce - http://markvoce.com/
Matt Lauder - http://www.mattlauder.com.au/
Michael Anderson - http://www.michaelandersongallery.com
Michael Fatali - http://www.fatali.com/
Michael Frye - http://www.michaelfrye.com
Michael Gordon - http://www.michael-gordon.com/
Michael  Kenna - www.michaelkenna.net
Michael Levin - http://www.michaellevin.ca/
Michael Nichols - http://michaelnicknichols.com/
Michael Reichmann - www.luminous-landscape.com
Michael Schlegel - http://www.michaelschlegel.com/
Mike Mc Farlane - http://www.mikemcfarlane.co.uk/
Murray Fredericks - http://www.murrayfredericks.com.au/
Nat Coalson - http://www.natcoalson.com/
Olivier Seydoux - http://www.oseydoux.com/
Patrick Endres - http://www.asmpalaska.org/members/EndresP/Endres.html
Patrick Smith - http://www.patricksmithphotography.com/
Paul Schilliger - http://www.paulschilliger.com
Paul Wakefield - http://www.paulwakefield.co.uk/
Peter Eastway - http://www.petereastway.com.au/
Peter Watson - http://www.peterwatson-photographer.com/
Rafael Rojas - http://www.rafaelrojasphoto.com/
Randy Dyar - http://www.ryandyar.com/
Rhys Davies - http://www.rhysdaviesphotography.com/
Ricardo Silva - http://www.theuntappedsource.com/res...p?category=407
Rob Hudson - http://www.open-aspect.co.uk/section426194_357575.html
Rodney Lough Jr. - http://www.rodneyloughjr.com/
Rolfe Horn - http://www.f45.com/html/recent/recindex.html
Ryan Dyar - http://www.ryandyar.com/
Sally Gall - www.sallygall.com
Samuel Bitton - http://www.samuelbitton.com/
Shawn Thompson - http://shawnthompsonphotography.com/
Simon Beedle - http://www.simonbeedle.com/
Tad Moyseowicz - http://www.tm-photography.co.uk/
Tom Mackie - http://www.tommackie.com/
Tom Till - http://www.tomtill.com/photography/index.cfm
Tomas Kaspar - http://www.tomaskaspar.com
Tony Sweet - http://www.tonysweet.com/
Tristan and Cyril Campbell - http://www.absolutelynothing.co.uk/
Tristan Campbell - http://www.tristancampbell.co.uk/
Uwe Steinmuller - http://www.outbackphoto.com/
Varina Patel - http://www.photographybyvarina.com/
Vincent Munier - http://www.vincentmunier.com/
William Neill - http://www.williamneill.com
Xavier Jamonet - http://www.ecrinsdelumiere.com/
Yann Arthus-Bertrand - http://www.yannarthusbertrand.org
Zack Schnepf - http://homepage.mac.com/zackschnepf/...phy/index.html
« Last Edit: April 20, 2011, 11:43:31 AM by Lonnie Utah » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2011, 03:17:03 PM »
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Peter Lik is simply a descent photographer but with a huge marketing team behind him. What annoys me about is this horseshite he comes out with that he doesn't do any post production, that he's a purist and doesn't use photoshop. I even saw a video clip of him at a volcano where he was standing in front of a medium format digital camera going on about how difficult it was getting the image on film!! He is a descent photographer who makes big saturated photos (with no use of photoshop honest) which appeal to the masses...JMO
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« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2011, 03:19:06 PM »
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Peter Lik is simply a descent photographer but with a huge marketing team behind him. What annoys me about is this horseshite he comes out with that he doesn't do any post production, that he's a purist and doesn't use photoshop. I even saw a video clip of him at a volcano where he was standing in front of a medium format digital camera going on about how difficult it was getting the image on film!! He is a descent photographer who makes big saturated photos (with no use of photoshop honest) which appeal to the masses...JMO

A photographer appealing to the masses - oh the horror.
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« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2011, 12:38:51 AM »
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You haven't heard of Tom Till or Ian Plant?? This kind of gets to my point.  How many other photographers work do you really know?  

And who are you to make such statement of my person? That is improper.

For benefit of my doubt I took a closer look at the websites of Tom Till and Ian Plant. Following are my personal impressions:

Tom Till - Photos in bright day and not good light, amateurish landscape images.
Ian Plant - Photos in better light but sensor not up for capture, amateurish landscape images.

Funny thing though… I was reminded that I had seen Ian Plant's website before because I had purchased his eBook Chasing Light since it sounded good per his advertising. It taught me zip zil and nothing of landscape photography and I found it worthless. Frankly I should ask for money back. In my opinion he is far from a master of landscape photography. Oh, and someone was speaking of Peter Lik being over marketed and sales…?? Sweet Smiley. For someone looking for a good beginner resource of landscape photography I can much rather recommend eBooks and books by John Shaw, or books and articles by Galen Rowell. Those are excellent and QUALITY.



@ All,

Lets recapture.... what was my original post about???

It was a review of the APP of Peter Lik’s work. It was not a review of Peter Lik’s work. I said I found the APP a sheer inspiration and recommend the APP as such. Did someone in above misread and turn discussion from that into one of like or not of Peter Lik??
If you do not like Pete Lik, why care? Just move on and be happy. However, chances are you are missing an APP that can teach you something of landscape photography, if you are capable to see art and beyond fundamental basics, and not merely poop on some pixels in corner and straight horizons or their not… Smiley

Of APPS of landscape photography I have found so far the one with Peter Lik’s work is the only one I can rate as excellent in what it taught me about photography. And yes, very far above that Chasing the Light by Ian Plant which I found worthless, basic and amateurish. If anyone know of any other APPS of landscape photography and at an advanced level please let us know!

And heaven forbid if it is by someone who actually has won even a few of such awards that Peter has won, sold at Sotheby and been decorated by piers with title Master Photographer (not here at LuLa obvious…)… Smiley

I can suggest when looking at Peter Lik images, to observe how he has worked with contrast of colors, with light and with contrast of light. I found that impressive and a great lesson from a master (also to be somehow reminiscent of Hudson River School of Painters). My own observation is that his way of doing so at times frank reminds me of how Ansel Adams did in BW, however Peter does it in color. It appears he also use filters to aid in this process, I suspect some specific ones from Singh-Ray, along with ND grads and CP. If he did not use Photoshop, then my personal guess is it must be another software for adjustments also of his 617 film images… else I find difficult to see how it could be possible to render in the ways he does, unless for the 617 with curves and more in scanning software....

I found it interesting stuff. Perhaps some of you will also… Smiley

Cheers
Anders
« Last Edit: April 20, 2011, 12:40:30 AM by Anders_HK » Logged
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