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Author Topic: Epson 7890...a not so favorable review  (Read 13907 times)
Farmer
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« Reply #40 on: April 21, 2011, 06:37:54 AM »
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Scrinch - it's worth noting that Ian's tutorial is talking about CS2...which makes it a bit outdated.  I'm not sure whether the advocates that as a viable workflow anymore, but I think the majority will tell you that you have greater control and greater consistency with the method we're proposing - half a decade more experience and oh so many changes under the hood of PS and OS X and Windows and, well, just experience backs up the preference :-)
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Schewe
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« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2011, 10:46:51 AM »
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As far as being a beginner, well I admit I am not a techie, but I have been as a working full time photograher for over 20 years now.  ( No trust fund or rich wife or doting parents carrying my load either)  I am opening myself to further criticism by some I am sure, but you can see my work and profile at www.jkwhitephoto.com.

Your photography is quite nice...but your experience in shooting doesn't equate to experience printing to a fine art printer like the 7890. The craft of preparing and printing digital images is an art that needs to be learned.

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If you've just upgraded to Photoshop CS2 from an earlier version then Let Printer Determine Colors is the direct equivalent of Printer Color Management in Photoshop 7 and CS. Let Printer Determine Colors is probably the easiest and safest choice for new Photoshop users or those who are not yet familiar with how to integrate printer ICC media profiles into their workflow.

Note, the Let Printer Determine Colors may be "the easiest and safest choice" but Ian doesn't say it's the best. It isn't. If you have good printer/paper profiles you will get superior results (particularly for a modern wider gamut printer) letting Photoshop Manage Color and select the correct profile. This really is inkjet printing 101.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2011, 03:33:10 PM »
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As far as a printing workflow goes.. I use Adobe RGB in PS  then select that space also in the Print driver and select Let Printer Determine and select the correct paper type in the driver. 
Despite what you may have read, this is definitely not the best workflow with current software and drivers. true it may yield acceptable results, but that doesn't mean its the best. Letting the printer control colors is never a good option when doing high quality printing on epson printers.  This forum is full of experts and very experienced printers - none of which would recommend your workflow for practical use.  Despite your years of experience as a photographer, as mentioned by Jeff this doesn't translate to knowledge in producing high end prints from inkjet technology.

Letting Photoshop determine colors is the best way to insure a completely color managed workflow - anything else and there are too many things that can get in the way.
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Sharon Van Lieu
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« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2011, 04:31:50 PM »
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These videos will save you so much time and money. I highly recommend them. I know they are working on a new one now. Maybe the old series will be  discounted.

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/videos/camera-print.shtml

Sharon
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scrinch
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« Reply #44 on: April 21, 2011, 06:30:46 PM »
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Scrinch - it's worth noting that Ian's tutorial is talking about CS2...which makes it a bit outdated. 

Yes,  I too am also outdated as I am still using CS2.  I though about going to CS5 but my G5 PowerPC isn't supported by the new PS.  Money keeps me from changing too much too quickly.   

I am very willing to go to a new better workflow, my  point was that this is a viable workflow, and for good or bad, the one I chose to use for all my images on the 1280.  My concern is that the image will look different if run through another workflow and again all my images in each size will need tweaking to print correctly on the 7890.  This would be a phenomenal amount of work.  Only so much time in the day,  and I really would rather shoot new images rather than go back over old images trying to get them to print correctly..That said I definately will give it a go tomorrow and see the results using the "Let Photoshop Determine" and print out on the 7890.

Thanks again for the positive input 

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Rick Popham
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« Reply #45 on: April 23, 2011, 11:45:02 AM »
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I am very willing to go to a new better workflow, my  point was that this is a viable workflow, and for good or bad, the one I chose to use for all my images on the 1280.  My concern is that the image will look different if run through another workflow and again all my images in each size will need tweaking to print correctly on the 7890.  This would be a phenomenal amount of work.  

Very nice photography, Scrinch.  I know that change can be tough, but I think you'll probably have to do it.  Your current workflow has tied all of your output to one specific printer -- which is no longer available.  Any new printer, with different printing technology and a different inkset is going to produce a different result from files tuned to work with a 1280.

When you use a color managed workflow, rather than a printer specific workflow, this problem largely disappears.  Using a properly calibrated monitor and proper printer/paper profiles with Photoshop managing colors will produce much more consistent results no matter what printer you use.  Everyone is recommending this workflow because in the long run, it will SAVE you work; especially if you switch printers.

One last thing I'd like to point out.  Adobe has changed their upgrade policy to 3 versions back.  So if you're using CS2, then CS5 is the last version eligible for the upgrade price.  You'll have to pay full price for CS6.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2011, 11:46:51 AM by Rick Popham » Logged
Mark D Segal
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« Reply #46 on: April 23, 2011, 11:58:59 AM »
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Excellent observations. I would add to that as drivers and applications advance, support with legacy operating systems can also disappear. It's kind of circular treadmill between OS - applications - drivers and around, or wherever the chain begins and ends. Main point is that sooner or later it gets you at one critical juncture or another.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
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« Reply #47 on: April 24, 2011, 05:07:31 AM »
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Excellent observations. I would add to that as drivers and applications advance, support with legacy operating systems can also disappear. It's kind of circular treadmill between OS - applications - drivers and around, or wherever the chain begins and ends. Main point is that sooner or later it gets you at one critical juncture or another.


So true.  I think the saying is,  "the only real constant is change."

I did manage to write a PS action to correct previous images printed on the 1280 so I could run them through the PS driven workflow.  Ended up being quite easy after all.  Amazingly, where my monitor has always been profiled and I made adjustments within the 1280 printer to give me correct looking prints very little actual tweaking was needed.
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Farmer
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« Reply #48 on: April 24, 2011, 07:23:28 AM »
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That's good news! :-)
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dave230862
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« Reply #49 on: April 24, 2011, 08:11:45 AM »
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Interesting thread.

I bought the 7890 about 6 weeks ago when Vistek advertized the "Golden Ticket" (additional $500 off the printer).

I was using the 3800 with extremely happy results on Ultrasmooth Fine Art and Ilford Gold Fibre Silk. Perfect renditions on paper, matching the screen (calibrated).

I set up the 7890 then discovered that not so many of the paper makers (Illford, for example) had updated their profiles. Oh well, stick to Epson for now, fair enough. Instead of photo paper I decided to try the Epson Hot Pressed Natural and picked up a 24 inch roll.  The near blacks were totally muddy. I did a side by side print from the 3800 and there was nothing to compare, the 3800 was exactly matching the screen, the 7890 was muddy. After tweaking the file in CS5 I could reproduce "somewhat" close to the 3800 print.

In the end, I went to California on a business trip and came back with a Spyder3 Print system, created a profile for the Epson paper, ran the printer via Photoshop Manages Colour and Voila!....perfect prints again.

How is it that Epson's profiles could be that bad?

On the ink usage values, I'm running between 1.5 and 2 ml per square foot, noting that I tend to have dark subjects/backgrounds so may actually be slightly higher than typical. No complaints on cost of operation, just the poor profiles.
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