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Author Topic: Portfolio Review - Request for a presentation recommendation  (Read 8135 times)
JerryReed
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« on: April 28, 2011, 06:13:27 PM »
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I intend to schedule several portfolio reviews later this year and next, and would appreciate responses from photographers as to HOW the reviewer expects that the work will be presented.  I bought a clam-shell type box that will accommodate 16 by 20 inch items.

Specifically, do reviewers expect the images to be 1) mounted 2) mounted and with a matte or 3) loose images?  Incidentally, all my images are shown  in square format.

A consideration for me is that the paper that I like, Epson Exhibition Fiber, is quite easily scratched.  Does someone have a work around for this aspect of my art pieces?

Jerry Reed
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ckimmerle
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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2011, 03:19:30 PM »
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It really depends on the type of photography you do. Fashion, architecture, reportage, etc. are usually shown in books with each photo in a polyethylene or polypro page. Landscapes and fine-art are usually shown in clam-shell boxes. The issue of whether to mount, mat or display loose depends a lot on your personal preferences and those of your intended reviewers. Many of the older, traditional landscape and fine-art photographers prefer prints to be mounted or matted as it's a more formal presentation. However, it's becoming more and more acceptable to show loose prints, especially at organized portfolio review events where time is quite limited with little room for overly aesthetic presentations.

Depending on your backing board (foam core vs. 4-ply mat board), a 2" box will hold less than than a dozen over-matted prints. You may actually get close to 2-dozen surface matted prints, and definitely more than 50 loose prints with interleaving paper. The number of prints you want to show will definitely be a factor.

Interleaving paper is a good choice for fragile print surfaces, but be aware it can become rather cumbersome to work with when time is short. Still, it may be better than having scratches.

BTW, if you intend to show loose images, be sure to include plenty of white space. It gives a more refined look compared to printing up to the paper edge.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2011, 03:21:11 PM by ckimmerle » Logged

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DennisWilliams
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2011, 03:17:39 PM »
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Distance yourself from images in a portfolio with sleeves (Pratt)  and especially loose in a box (I love aluminum).  They will get dinged crimped and eventually destroyed.   Replace them as necessary.  Very few who will ever review your work will show the class of a Susan Spiritus and put on gloves and carefully examine one piece at a time.
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