Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Guide to Cinematography Pt 2 - What do you want?  (Read 11859 times)
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1921



« on: April 29, 2011, 05:31:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Jeff Schewe's thread on suggestions for the new Camera To Print & Screen Tutorial worked so well that I would like to ask for the same type of input from forum readers for the upcoming Guide to Cinematography Part 2

In another thread, examples of DoF use and non-optimal shutter speeds for video have been asked for.

Any other topics or examples?

Part Two of Ci4P will be more on Shooting (capture) and Equipment. Part Three will concentrate on Editing & PostProduction.
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
Henk Peter
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 9


« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2011, 11:43:38 PM »
ReplyReply

Re. my suggestions in the other thread: it's not that Michael and you Chris do not clearly explain in a "visual" way all these new (to me) things but after watching the two of you for fifteen minutes I thought - wait - this is a video about video, why do I not get to see the examples of the things these people talk about?

It was like watching a sound track, to put it disrespectful. Part 01 to 05 could have been .mp3 sound files and I would not have missed a thing. ;-)
In fact I have only been listening to part 04 and 05.

Just 3-5 seconds examples of the thing you talk about will do, I'm sure you have these somewhere in your archives so not much additional work will be involved.
I look forward to the next part of the series, your "video books" or tutorials have a great potential.

Regards,
Henk
Logged
W.T. Jones
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 121



WWW
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2011, 07:32:07 AM »
ReplyReply

I will certainly purchase & watch the part II as this whole video thing is black magic to me. Maybe touch a little more on the use of external sound equipment & its use while capturing.

However I really want to know the specifics of editing & post production. So I guess I will have to wait a bit longer. I assume that integrating sound with the movie part will be in part three.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2011, 07:34:14 AM by W.T. Jones » Logged

Warren
Kevin Gallagher
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 274



WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2011, 09:35:13 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Chris, I'd like to see more on the editing and post production aspects as well. Been stumbling around in PP and FCP.
Logged
BFoto
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 241



WWW
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2011, 05:07:56 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Chris, I'd like to see more on the editing and post production aspects as well. Been stumbling around in PP and FCP.
+1 here.

One of the target audiences i presume is the still photog who wants to get into it, like myself. Technology and gear is important, especially how to use, but while the product placement is nice to see what the industry is bringing to the forefront, seeing a "real world" workflow is what's needed next.

'From Camera to Screen' if you will.



Logged

FDewannieux
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 17


« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2011, 04:02:48 PM »
ReplyReply

I would be very interested in

-DAM for video and in relationship to DAM for stills (Like many I use Lightroom that can catalogue some (5D2) but not all (GH2) video footage)
-Workflow
-Sound: synchronization with an external recording device (like a Zoom)
-Sound: sound editing (using Audacity for example)
-Standard formats (for editing and outputs), standard bit rates
-Some basic editing principles (sequences length, transition)

Looking forward to the next videos !

Franck
Logged
jwhee0615
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51


« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 09:22:43 PM »
ReplyReply

Chris, when is part 2 due out?
Logged
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1921



« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2011, 09:30:22 PM »
ReplyReply

I think not until I have completed Camera to Print & Screen - at least a couple of months.

Also, the whole Final Cut X debacle has rather altered my plans for a Post-Production Ci4P Part Three.

I am a Final Cut user and there is no point in doing a tutorial on a dead-ended piece of software. Final Cut X is useless to me at the moment but perhaps once I have mastered Adobe's Premiere and got a walking acquaintance with a FCP X that is improved and updated, we will proceed to that too.

Chris
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
jwhee0615
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 51


« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2011, 09:44:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Ah, ok thanks for the reply Chris. I very much enjoyed part 1 and have been looking forward to the rest. Will definitely check out Camera to Print & Screen. Have a great evening.

Jeff
Logged
Sareesh Sudhakaran
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 547


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 11:25:53 PM »
ReplyReply

First topic:

One of the challenges I face is to achieve the film look on a feature film - mainly in relation to dynamic range and tonal response - WITHOUT heavy color grading in post production. I'm not talking about a specialized color graded look like orange-teal, matrix green, or whatever.

These things are constant (between film and video):
1. 24p
2. 180 degree shutter or 1/50th shutter
3. Enough lighting to control the shadows and highlights at will, from shot to shot
4. Good production values - sets, costumes and props
5. Slow pans and tilts, etc.

Most feature films are made with cameras that fall into these categories:
1. DSLRs like the 7D, 60D, GH2, D5100, etc
2. 'High-end' Consumer grade, like the Panasonic AG-HMC40, Sony NEX-VG10, Canon XA10, JVC GY-HM100U, etc
2. Prosumer Cameras like the FS100, XF series, AF series, EX1, EX3, Sony F3, etc
3. Broadcast quality HD Cams, like the Sony PDW series, the Panasonic HPX series (AJ, AK), etc
4. Professional systems specializing in feature films, like Alexa, Red, Cinealta, etc

Various tests have been conducted to test the dynamic range, resolution, sharpness, etc of possibly every system, but nobody has created a real-world side-by-side test involving human beings in different lighting conditions to verify if the film look is even possible with any or all of these systems.

Another topic is:

Choosing the right codec and post production workflow has become part of the cinematographer's responsibility, since he/she will have to tailor, change or manipulate the lighting design of a video based on it. It would be very helpful in defining and outlining a methodology to select the right system for each project. Unfortunately, unlike 35mm or 16mm film, it is the limitation of each system that defines and categorizes it, and the lower you go, the more compromises or corrections you might have to make. A cinematographer who does not understand these technical issues is doing a disservice to the project, in my opinion (as a director).

Last topic for now:

Stereoscopy and 3D filmmaking, with its issues, challenges and rewards.

Hope this helps.


Logged

Get the Free Comprehensive Guide to Rigging ANY Camera - one guide to rig them all - DSLRs to the Arri Alexa.
snoleoprd
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 472



WWW
« Reply #10 on: August 13, 2011, 10:37:07 PM »
ReplyReply

I would love to see Premier Pro to be covered in detail.

In the links doc you might want to add Cinema5d.com as a resource.

Just starting to go through the first part.

Alan
Logged

Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1921



« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2011, 09:25:05 AM »
ReplyReply

I will (eventually) cover both Premiere and FCP X but first I have a few hours of Camera to Print & Screen to complete!

There are many good online Tutorials for both apps, so the coverage will be more by principle & workflow rather than what button to push in every situation.
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
fredjeang
Guest
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2011, 04:12:29 PM »
ReplyReply

If the #2 is going to be more "on set" orientated, I'd like to hear about basic techniques of narrative maybe more than too much tech aspects because as photographers, I think that this is maybe the weakest part for us.
Logged
Chris Sanderson
Administrator
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1921



« Reply #13 on: August 14, 2011, 04:29:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Yes, I think practical examples might be used:

CU Michael; MS Chris; ECU Michael finger tapping; CU Chris [hurrying up]; CU Michael [interruption]; WS SMA street - Chris w/donkey; End Credits.

Did you like that movie?

 Roll Eyes
Logged

Christopher Sanderson
The Luminous-Landscape
fredjeang
Guest
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2011, 02:40:39 PM »
ReplyReply

Yes, I think practical examples might be used:

CU Michael; MS Chris; ECU Michael finger tapping; CU Chris [hurrying up]; CU Michael [interruption]; WS SMA street - Chris w/donkey; End Credits.

Did you like that movie?

 Roll Eyes

WS CHris explaining the codecs;  ECU on CHris mounth sacarstically laughing knowing we don't understand anything; OSS Michael's entering while Chris on background is now falling about laughing imaginating us in front of the editing pipeline trying 2 million dollars equipment when we could do the same for 800 bucks; CU Michael joining Chris in the sofa with a new camera for testing; Zooming on camera and voice-off Chris: "What do you bring today?";
Michael: "My brand new Epic"; TS Chris falling in tears, Michael laughing sacarstically...he he he... Tongue
 
« Last Edit: August 16, 2011, 05:34:51 PM by fredjeang » Logged
PierreVandevenne
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 512


WWW
« Reply #15 on: August 17, 2011, 07:09:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Depends on the speed of Michael fingers, and the effect it demonstrates. :-)
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad