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Author Topic: NEC PA 301W  (Read 5744 times)
Jeff Kott
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« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2011, 12:35:56 PM »
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Andrew,

Thanks for your time and explanations. I'm still wondering if I should just exchange the colorimeter.

Have you noticed much sample variation in colorimeters or do you think I'm barking up the wrong tree?  Smiley

Jeff
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digitaldog
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« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2011, 12:37:45 PM »
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Have you noticed much sample variation in colorimeters or do you think I'm barking up the wrong tree?  Smiley

Not having more than one sample of product, I can’t say. But I suspect that by altering the WP values, you’ll end up with a target that works.
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Andrew Rodney
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2011, 07:50:32 PM »
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Try to calibrate the display to D65 without a sensor using NEC Multiprofiler software, and tell us if the green cast is still there.

I just profiled using the Multiprofiler software and no sensor and the result was a slightly greener cast than when I use the Spectraview II and the NEC Colorimeter.
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2011, 08:29:18 PM »
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You have to adjust the white point using x/y custom values. See: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=55782.new#lastPost:

When people report their display is too green/magenta, the fix can be zooming in on the central white point of the CIE xy diagram in the SpectraView software. It will give you a better idea of how changing the x and y values will affect the white point. If the screen is too green, you‘ll want to move the white point down and to the right (vise versa for magenta). Make tiny adjustments (i.e. 0.002) and recalibrate. Understand that this only works if the calibration software allows you to enter specific CIE xy values.

Andrew, I apologize for not understanding the Spectraview II software better, but I've been through the manual and I'm still not sure how to do what you've suggested.

From the main control window if I go to Edit>Target Settings>Edit (under White Point), I get a dialog box with a radio button for CIE coordinates, which shows x - 0.3127 and y-0.3290.




I can raise or lower those values in increments of 0.001, but which way is "down and to the right"? Is this the correct dialogue box? Do I put the sensor on and click measure?

Thanks in advance for your assistance.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2011, 11:53:24 PM by Jeff Kott » Logged
digitaldog
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« Reply #24 on: July 19, 2011, 09:22:04 PM »
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White Point>Custom, click on Edit button.
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Andrew Rodney
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2011, 09:51:49 PM »
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White Point>Custom, click on Edit button.

I still don't follow.

From the main Spectraview II window under Edit, I go to Target, then I get the Edit Calibration Target, under White Point I click Edit and I get the Custom White Point window that I showed above. Correct?

Now what - what values are down and to the right to reduce the greenish cast?
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howardm
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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2011, 10:12:18 PM »
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You might want to consider downloading the free NEC 'Multiprofiler' software.  That has an XY color coded CIE graph taht you can move the target value cursor to any position you want.  The Spectraview software doesn't have that, only the XY input boxes which is why you're confused Smiley
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #27 on: July 20, 2011, 12:17:39 AM »
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You might want to consider downloading the free NEC 'Multiprofiler' software.  That has an XY color coded CIE graph taht you can move the target value cursor to any position you want.  The Spectraview software doesn't have that, only the XY input boxes which is why you're confused Smiley

Yes, Andrew has me very confused. I thought I made it clear that I was in the Spectraview II software and he didn't mention that I had to go into the MultiProfiler.

I followed your advice and went into the Multiprofiler software, Custom>Full Custom>

then, selected the memory location to be "Spectraview II";

then, went to the White Point setting and dragged the little blue ball down and to the right a teensy bit which gave me a "Correlated Color Temp" of 6680 and clicked "Finish" and now to my eyes the whites on screen look more white and less green to me and they look more like the whites on my prints.

What I don't understand is how the MultiProfiler software correlates to the Spectraview II. If in two weeks I recalibrate using the Spectraview II and my Colorimeter will it undo the change to the white point that I made in the Multiprofiler software? And then do I have to go back into the Multiprofiler to redo the white point?

Thanks for your advice.

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howardm
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« Reply #28 on: July 20, 2011, 07:21:59 AM »
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You don't technically *have* to go into Multiprofiler but it's a whole lot faster ultimately.

Multiprofiler is open-ended 'setter' w/o any ability to actually calibrate (ie. use a puck for closed loop feedback) but it's nice because it's interactive (although it seems to need a few bugs squashed which make using it a bit of a pain)

Once you find the correct white point, scribble down on a Post-It Smiley the XY coordinates.  Put those #'s into Spectraview as the target white point for the calibration.  You could easily create a setup file/condition  in Spectraview so that all you need to do is select that setup and press Calibrate.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 07:38:28 AM by howardm » Logged
digitaldog
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« Reply #29 on: July 20, 2011, 08:25:48 AM »
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I still don't follow.
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Andrew Rodney
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #30 on: July 20, 2011, 12:52:44 PM »
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You don't technically *have* to go into Multiprofiler but it's a whole lot faster ultimately.

Multiprofiler is open-ended 'setter' w/o any ability to actually calibrate (ie. use a puck for closed loop feedback) but it's nice because it's interactive (although it seems to need a few bugs squashed which make using it a bit of a pain)

Once you find the correct white point, scribble down on a Post-It Smiley the XY coordinates.  Put those #'s into Spectraview as the target white point for the calibration.  You could easily create a setup file/condition  in Spectraview so that all you need to do is select that setup and press Calibrate.

Howard, that makes sense. Thanks for clearing it up for me.
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Jeff Kott
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« Reply #31 on: July 20, 2011, 01:58:20 PM »
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As you can see above, I had no trouble finding the suggested dialogue box.

For anyone who may stumble on this thread later on, as Howard pointed out above, unlike the custom white point setting in the NEC Multiprofile software, there is no way to physically move the white point down and to the right in this dialogue box. To accomplish this objective in the Spectraview II software, you have to input lower x and lower y CIE Coordiantes to "move the white point down and to the right" and if you have a magenta cast you would input higher x and higher y coordinates to "move the white point up and to the left."
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davidh202
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« Reply #32 on: July 20, 2011, 07:14:09 PM »
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Jeff, I was a total failure at math  Roll Eyes
 but I seem to recall plotting graphs from way back in the day
Changing the numeric value of the x coordinate (negative or posative) will move the target 'point' left or right.
Changing the numeric value of the Y coordinate                "                 will move the target point up or down.

Coordinate the two and you can move your target point  straight across at any given y axis, straight up or down at any given x axis, or  in any direction diagonally, by the correct input of both X & Y.

 
« Last Edit: July 20, 2011, 07:35:46 PM by davidh202 » Logged
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