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Author Topic: New XRite I1 Display Pro Calibration device  (Read 38634 times)
ericstaud
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« Reply #60 on: November 01, 2011, 12:56:51 PM »
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I'm a little confused about the NEC Hardware/Software options. I have Spectraview II already for my LCD2690wuxi. As far as adding new calibration hardware it looks like I have two options which have the same end result but at different prices....

A. The XRITE I1 Display Pro for $250.00 and use that with the Spectraview software or the I1 software.
B. The NEC SpectraSensor Pro for $200.00 and use that with Spectraview software or the I1 software.

Are these devices the same, or is the NEC specially filtered like the old colorimeter? Why would I or anyone buy the XRITE version for $50 more? In the press release for the NEC SpectraSensor Pro it looks like I get to use the I1 software for that device in addition to the Spectraview software.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2011, 01:06:02 PM by ericstaud » Logged
WillH
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« Reply #61 on: November 01, 2011, 01:41:23 PM »
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Since you already have the SpectraView II software, you just need a color sensor if you feel you need to upgrade.

You could either go with the the full X-Rite iOne Display Pro package (sensor+software), or the alternate is to get the NEC SpectraSensor Pro sensor for $200.

So the extra $50 would get you essentially the same device, but with the addition of the X-Rite software (which you wouldn't use with the LCD2690WUXi anyway).

Note that the NEC SpectraSensor Pro is not supported in the X-Rite software. However the NEC SpectraView II software supports both the NEC SpectraSensor Pro and the X-Rite iOne Display Pro sensors.
« Last Edit: November 01, 2011, 02:05:51 PM by WillH » Logged

Will Hollingworth
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NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
ericstaud
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« Reply #62 on: November 01, 2011, 08:17:47 PM »
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Since you already have the SpectraView II software, you just need a color sensor if you feel you need to upgrade.

You could either go with the the full X-Rite iOne Display Pro package (sensor+software), or the alternate is to get the NEC SpectraSensor Pro sensor for $200.

So the extra $50 would get you essentially the same device, but with the addition of the X-Rite software (which you wouldn't use with the LCD2690WUXi anyway).

Note that the NEC SpectraSensor Pro is not supported in the X-Rite software. However the NEC SpectraView II software supports both the NEC SpectraSensor Pro and the X-Rite iOne Display Pro sensors.

Thanks for the clarification Will. Seems the extra $50 for the XRITE version may be worth it in my case since I don't currently have a software solution for my laptop or iMac screens.
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shewhorn
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« Reply #63 on: November 02, 2011, 12:01:53 AM »
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Note that the NEC SpectraSensor Pro is not supported in the X-Rite software. However the NEC SpectraView II software supports both the NEC SpectraSensor Pro and the X-Rite iOne Display Pro sensors.

A very timely post, thanks for the info Will. One more question... since SVII will only calibrate and profile NEC monitors, will the SpectraSensor Pro work with other 3rd party software such as Color Eyes Display Pro, and BasICColor Display when they release versions that support the i1 Display Pro? I would think BasICColor would since Spectraview Profiler is BasICColor Display. I think that functionality is more important than working with i1 Profiler. Phenomenal software for making printer profiles. Not so much when it comes to monitors though. That it's not compatible with i1 Profiler isn't something that would concern me at all.

Cheers, Joe
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Czornyj
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« Reply #64 on: November 02, 2011, 05:37:33 AM »
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i1Profiler is not that bad - what more, it can be installed on unlimited number of computers and activated simply by plugging the device.

On the other hand - you can save 50$ getting NEC SpectraSensor Pro and use it with (as free as mighty) ArgyllCMS to calibrate&profile other displays as well.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2011, 05:41:23 AM by Czornyj » Logged

WillH
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« Reply #65 on: November 02, 2011, 08:54:56 AM »
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will the SpectraSensor Pro work with other 3rd party software such as Color Eyes Display Pro, and BasICColor Display when they release versions that support the i1 Display Pro?
Due to the device "locking" mechanism implemented on the new sensors, each software application must be given the keys to access each different device. We will work with other software vendors on this issue as necessary, however our immediate priority is supporting the NEC device in the NEC software.
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Will Hollingworth
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shewhorn
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« Reply #66 on: November 02, 2011, 11:42:02 AM »
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Due to the device "locking" mechanism implemented on the new sensors, each software application must be given the keys to access each different device. We will work with other software vendors on this issue as necessary, however our immediate priority is supporting the NEC device in the NEC software.

Thanks Will. So it sounds like it will just take a little time to see how things pan out.

Cheers, Joe
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natjencks
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« Reply #67 on: November 03, 2011, 12:23:57 AM »
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Hi Will, I have a brand new PA271W's which I purchases with spectraview II and the NEC branded i1 display 2.
I also have the i1 display pro 3 (i1D3) retail version which came with the i1 profiler software.

Would you recommend that I use the i1D3 device rather that the NEC i1d2 device?

When I try it I get a very very slightly higher delta e from the calibration, but overall the device may be more accurate compared a reference device?

Which device do you recommend that I use?

Thanks!
-Nat Jencks
« Last Edit: November 03, 2011, 12:26:11 AM by natjencks » Logged
WillH
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« Reply #68 on: November 03, 2011, 09:15:28 AM »
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Would you recommend that I use the i1D3 device rather that the NEC i1d2 device?

When I try it I get a very very slightly higher delta e from the calibration, but overall the device may be more accurate compared a reference device?

You should get very similar results from both devices since they are both optimized for the wide gamut of the PA series displays.

The delta-e results are more to do with how the display settles after adjustment, rather than the absolute accuracy of the measurement device (since you are calibrating and measuring with the same device).
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Will Hollingworth
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NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
j_g
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« Reply #69 on: November 04, 2011, 04:14:50 PM »
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The new I1 Display Pro is supposedly more accurate than the EyeOne Pro at low luminance levels.
I would like to know if anyone is getting more accurate measurements with the I1 Display Pro using Spectraview II? Is there a visible difference on displays like a MultiSync PA241W?

Does Spectraview II run on any I1 Display Pro or only those sold by X-Rite and NEC?

Thanks.
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WillH
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« Reply #70 on: November 04, 2011, 05:36:44 PM »
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The new I1 Display Pro is supposedly more accurate than the EyeOne Pro at low luminance levels.
I would like to know if anyone is getting more accurate measurements with the I1 Display Pro using Spectraview II? Is there a visible difference on displays like a MultiSync PA241W?

Does Spectraview II run on any I1 Display Pro or only those sold by X-Rite and NEC?

Since the PA series does a lot of the corrections and calculations internally based on it's self monitoring, the low luminance performance of the sensor doesn't have much influence on the calibration. Only the final results shown may have some differences in the contrast ratio and gray tracking due to the sensor performance.

Other models however do rely on the sensor for the full accuracy of the calibration, so there may be some visible differences.

SpectraView II only supports the NEC SpectraSensor Pro, X-Rite iOne Display Pro, and what X-Rite calls "low volume generic OEM" versions.
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Will Hollingworth
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NEC Display Solutions of America, Inc.
ComputerDork
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« Reply #71 on: November 28, 2011, 10:30:54 PM »
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Ok, so just to make absolutely sure I'm not missing something here:

- The X-Rite branded i1Display Pro will work with Spectraview II.
- The NEC "MDSVSENSOR3" won't work with X-Rite i1Profiler even though it's the same hardware. (Can you even buy i1Profiler by itself?)

Correct? So I should be safe buying the X-Rite branded i1 Display Pro for use with SV II?
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shewhorn
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« Reply #72 on: November 29, 2011, 10:45:58 AM »
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Ok, so just to make absolutely sure I'm not missing something here:

- The X-Rite branded i1Display Pro will work with Spectraview II.
- The NEC "MDSVSENSOR3" won't work with X-Rite i1Profiler even though it's the same hardware. (Can you even buy i1Profiler by itself?)

Correct? So I should be safe buying the X-Rite branded i1 Display Pro for use with SV II?

Correct. I have one (an X-Rite branded i1D3) and am using it with SVII.
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #73 on: November 29, 2011, 09:07:57 PM »
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I just bought the i1/Display Pro and will be using it with my MBP's and Apple displays.  I've calibrated two displays so far but am not sure about some of the settings.  Perhaps someone can steer me in the right direction.  The software gives me a choice of LED rgb or LED white (plus a few others) for my 27 and 24" displays, which should I choose.  Also, the tutorial suggests that photographers should use a whitepoint of 6500 while prepress users should pick 5000, is this correct?  My older 30 and 23" displays I believe are LCD's is that correct?  What settings would they use?  I would appreciate any info on this subject.  Thanks, Jim
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ComputerDork
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« Reply #74 on: November 29, 2011, 09:40:57 PM »
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It's hard to say whether or not you want RGB or white LEDs without the model numbers of the displays. If I understand this distinction properly, some "white" LEDs consist of a R, G, and B LED that, in combination, produce white light. The regular white ones are something like blue LEDs that use a phosphor to convert the blue light into a wider spectral distribution that's closer to white.

From the viewing perspective I'm not sure how much 6500K matters, but it matches the default white points of sRGB (for example) so should in theory, I guess, lose less information during color management. Also, I think most typical sRGB monitors tend to be optimized for 6500K as their "native" white point. 5000K is recommended for prepress because that's the 50D standard that's used for viewing booths and everything else. Of course if you're doing prepress or otherwise need D50 for some reason then you'll already know that and so probably don't need to be told.

Thing is though that the white point of ProPhotoRGB is D50 (5000K) which might mean that 5000K is better if you're using Lightroom, but I don't remember if MelissaRGB (Lightroom's internal version of ProPhoto) differs from D50 or not..... If anyone knows please tell me, and let me know how much it matters to use 5000K with lightroom if so.
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Czornyj
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« Reply #75 on: November 30, 2011, 07:29:07 AM »
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All modern Apple displays have W-LED backlight. Use D65 rather than D50, as paradoxically it usually gives better visual match, even with the standarized D50 viewing booth.
Don't worry about the difference between the wtpt of your editing space and calibration target, AFAIK the CMM of PS/LR uses color adaptation transform to correct the difference.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #76 on: November 30, 2011, 08:26:46 AM »
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There are very, very, very few RGB LED's out there (and none from Apple). So White.
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Andrew Rodney
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haefnerphoto
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« Reply #77 on: November 30, 2011, 08:58:10 AM »
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Thanks for the info and clarifications, I'm calibrating away!  Jim
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BillOConnor
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« Reply #78 on: December 03, 2011, 11:03:38 AM »
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Is there a NEC monitor with Spectra-View that you like better than its siblings? I'm not fussy about it being 24", 22 or 23 is fine.

Bill
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Czornyj
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« Reply #79 on: December 03, 2011, 03:06:53 PM »
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PA301W is a real king of the hill - not only the biggest, but also the only one with true 10 bit P-IPS matrix (rest has 8+2FRC).
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