Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Things that alter print size capability of a specific file.  (Read 498 times)
adam z
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 130


« on: June 30, 2011, 10:42:28 AM »
ReplyReply


Please forgive me if this is a long post! First, I hope the name of this thread made sense. If not, what I want to know is what factors affect the final print output size of a file. For example, my 7D has a resolution of 5184 x 3456. I do not wish to know how it compares with another cameras file when printed, but just the variables that can make a difference to printing a single file from my camera. The reason for this is I have a shop that wants to either stock or sell on consignment some of my prints. They want them in the next few weeks if possible. One of my main concerns is that I am unsure of how big I can print them before they will start lacking in quality as I have not made any decent sized prints from this camera as yet. Obviously quality is subjective, however I like to think that I have quite high standards, and refuse to sell something that I would not hang on my own wall. The most obvious thing would be to make test prints and evaluate what I personally consider to be acceptible, however right now I do not have a printer, so have to use a pro lab. The cost of doing this through a lab, not to mention the time involved would be prohibitive considering the short time I have to get the first few images ready. I am still undecided as to which paper (out of the ones that the lab have available) that I wish to use, and I think paper choice would probably be one of the things that makes a difference. I am assuming that smoother glossy papers produce sharper looking images, but require higher resolution output for a given print size, whereas on textured and/or matte papers I can probably get a way with printing slightly larger. Is this correct, and if so, how much difference is there?

I am also curious to know if uprezzing would be worthwhile, and if degradation of the final print would be noticeable on a 16x24 (or even 20x24) if done properly. The reason I ask is that a 360ppi 16x24 would require a native resolution of 5760 x 8640, which is obviously more that the cameras native resolution (My mention of 360ppi is my assumption that they are using an Epson printer, but I don't know for certain). It looks to me as though a 16x24 direct from the 7d would give only 216ppi. Without uprezzing, would this be likely to give a satisfactory result? By satisfactory, I mean someone looking at the print from up close, not just "regular" viewing distances. My instincts and reading tell me that it is probably not. That brings me back to the uprezzing. Is that something I should expect a highly regarded pro lab to take care of for me, or will I need to get some software and do it myself?

Sorry that this post is a little confusing, but I must admit it is because I myself am confused! Anyway, here are the papers that are available to me through the lab. I am not sure of what brands they use, so have just described tham as they have in their printing price list.

Standard Media:
Lustre
Gloss
Satin
Pearl

Art Paper:
German Etching
Photo Rag
Fine Art Pearl

I will most likely go with one of the art papers. I did notice that on some of the images on display at the lab, it mentioned Hahnemühle, so I assume that some of the papers mentioned above are by Hahnemühle. I am sure the lab will give me more details if I ask. From the information on paper types, what ones are most suited for which types of subject matter, and which would be likely to allow larger print size (if any).

One last factor I forgot to mention, is that I am pretty certain the level of fine detail in an image will also have an affect on the print size. How much difference is ther (in how big one could print with files from the same camera) if printing say, a portrait versus a highly detailed landscape?

I am sure other people will know of a few other factors that I might need to consider but have overlooked. Any help will be very much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Adam
Logged
Geoff Wittig
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1017


« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2011, 11:00:39 AM »
ReplyReply

Run a search and you'll find lots on this topic.
Short version, prints will look just fine at ~200 ppi, especially prints on more forgiving soft cotton rag papers like Photo rag or German etching, especially if they're properly sharpened. On glossy higher resolution papers images can look a bit better if they're carefully up-rez'd. Photoshop now does a remarkably good job of this on its own. I actually use a wonderful sizing/sharpening action from Charlie Cramer (provided only to attendees of his fantastic printing workshop), but simply up-rezing to 300 ppi or so in Photoshop will work pretty well for any image that doesn't have lots of fine/high frequency detail. For images that do, they'll require more finesse to avoid unpleasant artifacts as you uprez further.
Logged
adam z
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 130


« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2011, 11:11:27 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks, that is precisely the easy to understand information I was looking for. Obviously I will also discuss this topic with the lab, but want to have more understanding of what they are telling me.
Logged
Alan Goldhammer
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1616


WWW
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2011, 11:39:11 AM »
ReplyReply

A good reference is HERE.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad