Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Alpa 12 STC  (Read 3562 times)
TH_Alpa
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214



« on: July 03, 2011, 01:25:03 PM »
ReplyReply

Dear andalucia,

Yes, The Alpa 12 STC can be turned  by 90 degrees, clockwise when standing behind, to get rise/fall shift capability.

- Handgrip: it is a specific handgrip for the STC, alternatively for the Alpa Max, which can be fixed on the right side of the camera (when standing behind). It cannot be mounted as a right handgrip when the camera is turned by 90 degrees.

- Viewfinder: it is fixed by means of 2 screws on the top (see image), since each side is fitted with the same threaded holes it is possible to fix this viewfinder on any side of the camera.

Some images below.

Best regards
Thierry






As I understand, the STC is natively made for shifting left/right. Obviously one can turn it 90 degrees and get rise/fall, but my question is if I all four sides of the body will take on the grip and viewfinder? I would prefer to have rise/fall as my default position. I cannot see by the pictures if this is possible!

« Last Edit: July 03, 2011, 03:16:13 PM by TH_Alpa » Logged

dchew
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 572



WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2011, 02:26:08 PM »
ReplyReply

Thierry,
Just want to be clear: From standing behind the camera, you can rotate it 90 degrees clockwise to get rise and fall, but you cannot rotate it 90 degrees counterclockwise and utilize rise/fall.  When shifting the camera, the left side moves out beyond the camera frame, so if that left side is down, you cannot move the back down.  You could still raise the back, but that is probably the less-useful movement. 

I place a second small Kirk (or RRS) plate on the grip-side of the STC in order to mount the right side down for rise/fall of the back.

Dave

Yes, The Alpa 12 STC can be turned  by 90 degrees, left or right, to get rise/fall shift capability.
Logged

design_freak
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1074



« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2011, 02:40:39 PM »
ReplyReply

Thierry,
 best to make a video and put on youtube, some people have trouble imagining it. For me, it is clear.
Logged

Best regards,
DF

-------------------------------------------
WORK HARD AND BE NICE TO PEOPLE
-------------------------------------------
TH_Alpa
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214



« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2011, 03:14:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Dave,

Yes, that's correct, it was not clear enough. Thanks for jumping in (post edited).

For the clarity, some more images below.

Best regards
Thierry


Just want to be clear: From standing behind the camera, you can rotate it 90 degrees clockwise to get rise and fall, but you cannot rotate it 90 degrees counterclockwise and utilize rise/fall.   

I place a second small Kirk (or RRS) plate on the grip-side of the STC in order to mount the right side down for rise/fall of the back.

Dave

Logged

siebel
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 59


WWW
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2011, 05:09:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Just a users perspective - I am an architectural photographer and as such use the STC almost exclusively with vertical (rise/fall) shifts.
This places the handgrip on the bottom when shooting. It sounds awkward, but I have not had problems holding the camera in the field.There are small ridges on the left and right front of the body (when in the vertical position) that make it feel quite secure in the hand.
Mostly, it is sitting on a tripod anyway, so its completely a non issue.
One thing that I have found very handy is having the electronic level on the IQ180 back. I'm finding this, combined with the bubble levels on the Alpa very useful.
I have had discussions with the team at Alpa about introducing a handgrip that suits those of us who prefer vertical shift as our default movement. They took the feedback on board and I'm sure will give it due consideration.
The fact that the viewfinder fits on all sides of the body is very handy if you use it a lot. You can fit it wherever it suits, though I did find the screws a little tricky to fiddle with with gloves on when it is cold (I was shooting in Snow at xmas in Switzerland). The camera still feels secure in the hand in the summer heat, even with sweaty hands (its currently in the mid 40degC range in Dubai and will be up into the 50s in a few weeks). I certainly appreciate its light weight!

Cheers,

Siebel
www.bryansiebel.com

In the end, it's all about the pictures.
Logged

Bryan Siebel

In the end, it's all about the image.
www.bryansiebel.com
DanLindberg
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2011, 06:36:48 AM »
ReplyReply

I would use it almost exclusively with vertical shift, so it is good to have this explained. I have looked at the SWA closely and is still my favorite, but I thought the STC could be a contender for its lighter and smaller package. Thanks!

Siebel, great portfolio  Smiley
Logged

Alpa FPS & MAX & SWA & TC | SK 28XL | SK 35XL | SK 72L | SK 90N | SK 120N | Leaf Aptus II 5 & Leaf CREDO 60
http://www.danlindberg.com
https://www.facebook.com/danlindbergphotography
JerryReed
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 276


jerry@jerryreed.net


WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2011, 06:55:46 AM »
ReplyReply

Seibel,

I reviewed your web site.  Your portraits serve as wonderful examples for anyone wanting to see how to improve their work.  Really exceptional.

Jerry
Logged

TH_Alpa
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214



« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2011, 04:45:44 PM »
ReplyReply

Dear Bryan,

We need this type of field experience, practical, reasoned and critical, positive and/or negative. This is what brings others forward as well as us manufacturers.

Thanks
Thierry

Just a users perspective - I am an architectural photographer and as such use the STC almost exclusively with vertical (rise/fall) shifts.
This places the handgrip on the bottom when shooting. It sounds awkward, but I have not had problems holding the camera in the field.There are small ridges on the left and right front of the body (when in the vertical position) that make it feel quite secure in the hand.
Mostly, it is sitting on a tripod anyway, so its completely a non issue.
One thing that I have found very handy is having the electronic level on the IQ180 back. I'm finding this, combined with the bubble levels on the Alpa very useful.
I have had discussions with the team at Alpa about introducing a handgrip that suits those of us who prefer vertical shift as our default movement. They took the feedback on board and I'm sure will give it due consideration.
The fact that the viewfinder fits on all sides of the body is very handy if you use it a lot. You can fit it wherever it suits, though I did find the screws a little tricky to fiddle with with gloves on when it is cold (I was shooting in Snow at xmas in Switzerland). The camera still feels secure in the hand in the summer heat, even with sweaty hands (its currently in the mid 40degC range in Dubai and will be up into the 50s in a few weeks). I certainly appreciate its light weight!

Cheers,

Siebel
www.bryansiebel.com

In the end, it's all about the pictures.

Logged

design_freak
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1074



« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2011, 03:40:42 AM »
ReplyReply

Dear Bryan,

We need this type of field experience, practical, reasoned and critical, positive and/or negative. This is what brings others forward as well as us manufacturers.

Thanks
Thierry


Thierry,
I am glad that there are people like you and companies like Alpa. Approach worthy of emulation.
Logged

Best regards,
DF

-------------------------------------------
WORK HARD AND BE NICE TO PEOPLE
-------------------------------------------
TH_Alpa
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214



« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2011, 03:03:59 PM »
ReplyReply

Just wanted to inform and show that there are some more options available, when it comes to handgrips for the STC, namely the rotatable handgrip (add-on handgrip left/right, available in rosewood natural and in black).

Shown in the pictures is the alternative with release cable, with or without STC handgrip.

The rotatable grips can be set in over 20 securely locked positions by loosing one single screw. In this position and with the viewfinder one can shift vertically up by 18 mm (18 mm vertically down on the backside).

The viewfinder can obviously as well be mounted on the side, allowing for rise/fall shifts simultaneously

These handgrips are not displayed currently in the Alpa catalog of products, but some are available from stock and can be manufactured any time.

Best regards
Thierry
Logged

wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5744



WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2011, 04:35:18 PM »
ReplyReply

Interesting - hadn't seen those before.  I'm sure they don't rotate freely - is it a ball detent or some sort of lock mechanism that keeps them at a specific angle?

Mike.
Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
TH_Alpa
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 214



« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2011, 10:55:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Mike,

Yes, right, it doesn't rotate freely.

There is an axis around which the whole is rotating (360). There is a cogwheel in the middle of this axis: when the screw is tightened the whole grip locks in position, firmly and without possibility to move.
As said, there are around 20 different positions.

Thierry

Interesting - hadn't seen those before.  I'm sure they don't rotate freely - is it a ball detent or some sort of lock mechanism that keeps them at a specific angle?

Mike.
Logged

wolfnowl
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5744



WWW
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2011, 01:21:41 AM »
ReplyReply

"The rotatable grips can be set in over 20 securely locked positions by loosing one single screw. In this position and with the viewfinder one can shift vertically up by 18 mm (18 mm vertically down on the backside)."

See, I got so caught up in your images I didn't even read what you had written!   Tongue  Never a 2x4 around when you need one...

Mike.
Logged

If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad