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Author Topic: X-Rite i1 Display PRO v X-Rite ColorMunki Display  (Read 18655 times)
Mr_S
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« on: July 28, 2011, 01:58:06 PM »
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Hi All,


I've decided to take the plunge and buy a colorimeter.  I'm looking at the two models (in the subject above) and was wondering what the difference was?  From what I gather, the main difference is the operation speed of the unit and the bundled software...and about £60!  Being fairly new to all this, I could do with some pointers if possible and to avoid me making a purchase faux pas...

I'm going to be using the unit on my Dell u2711 and at present I'll only be using sRGB, with perhaps Adobe RGB later on down the line.  I'm interested in getting a decent profile for prints that I'll be hopefully selling - so would the ColorMunki suffice for my needs?

Thanks in advance...

Mr s.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2011, 03:01:44 PM »
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The EyeOne Display-2 has just been replaced by the EyeOne Display-3 and its a much better instrument!

Its a Colorimeter, its sole task is for calibration of a display. Its the ideal instrument for this task.
The ColorMunki is a Spectrophotometer. Its able to calibrate displays, albeit not to the accuracy in dark colors as a good Colorimeter but it also allows you to build profiles for printers (and for calibrating and profiling a projector). Cost more, does more.

If you don’t have a need to build paper profiles, go with the EyeOne Display-3.
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Andrew Rodney
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Mr_S
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2011, 03:38:31 PM »
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Thanks for the info.  We might have got our wires crossed though, I was looking at the ColorMunki display http://www.warehouseexpress.com/buy-x-rite-colormunki-display/p1526087 not the ColorMunki Photo...unless I've got it backwards  Huh Would you still rate the ColorMunki display?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2011, 05:06:57 PM »
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Thanks for the info.  We might have got our wires crossed though, I was looking at the ColorMunki display http://www.warehouseexpress.com/buy-x-rite-colormunki-display/p1526087 not the ColorMunki Photo...unless I've got it backwards  Huh Would you still rate the ColorMunki display?

Sorry, the naming is confusing...

That is the EyeOne Display-3 (new Colorimeter) which comes in two flavors. One is slower and provides less options for calibration. There is a competitive matrix on X-Rite’s site (http://www.xrite.com/custom_page.aspx?PageID=260). Speed isn’t a big deal but the options for calibration are, so if possible, go for the more expensive unit. Not having the ability to specifically target a white point and luminance is kind of a big deal if your goal is to nail the display to print matching. The ‘predefined’ settings mean you have to target to a specific preset, you can’t season to taste.
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Andrew Rodney
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Mr_S
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2011, 03:28:29 AM »
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Heh heh, I thought it was just me that thought the naming was confusing..! I wish these companies would just make it easy...I'm looking at you too Nvidia... Smiley

Thanks again - I'll splash the cash and get the display PRO.

Just out of interest - I've stumbled upon a forum where they were talking about storing colorimeters - they were saying the best place would be a drawer with an anti-moisture pack to help keep the unit from `drifting` over time.  Is this the preferred way of doing it as I don't fancy having to invest in a new unit sooner than I have too?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2011, 08:01:06 AM »
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Just out of interest - I've stumbled upon a forum where they were talking about storing colorimeters - they were saying the best place would be a drawer with an anti-moisture pack to help keep the unit from `drifting` over time.  Is this the preferred way of doing it as I don't fancy having to invest in a new unit sooner than I have too?

First I’ve heard that. I mean, sure, store the pup outside of the sink, but anti-moiture pack? Seems excessive. But then where I live, its really dry...
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Andrew Rodney
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Mr_S
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2011, 09:17:53 AM »
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It does seem a bit ott but...there seems to be people saying that it can prolong the life...Well, it couldn't hurt I guess.... Grin
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K.C.
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2011, 01:36:11 AM »
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It does seem a bit ott but...there seems to be people saying that it can prolong the life...Well, it couldn't hurt I guess.... Grin

Nothing quite like the photoforums to spawn a little urban folklore based on nothing more than conjecture. The part I find entertaining is the suggestion that a drawer can create a moisture barrier.

Back to the topic, I too looked at the Xrite site and it's really confusing and hard to decide where to jump in.

So for basic display calibration, vs. display and print, the ColorMunki does both but not very well ?
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eronald
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2011, 03:29:30 AM »
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Hi All,


I've decided to take the plunge and buy a colorimeter.  I'm looking at the two models (in the subject above) and was wondering what the difference was?  From what I gather, the main difference is the operation speed of the unit and the bundled software...and about £60!  Being fairly new to all this, I could do with some pointers if possible and to avoid me making a purchase faux pas...

I'm going to be using the unit on my Dell u2711 and at present I'll only be using sRGB, with perhaps Adobe RGB later on down the line.  I'm interested in getting a decent profile for prints that I'll be hopefully selling - so would the ColorMunki suffice for my needs?

Thanks in advance...

Mr s.

Just to be a contrarian, if cost is not the immediate issue, I would advocate ColorMunki, and getting the version which can profile prints too. It is a well-known product, which is fairly future proof -immune to changes in display technology-  and the print profiling feature should allow you to choose new papers without fear. If cost is an issue then i1Display Pro is obviously a strong contender. Obviously, both I and Andrew have seen both devices Smiley

Now, there has been a remark that ColorMunki does both screen and print but not very well. This is an interesting remark. CM has got very good reviews from people who used it for paper profiles, but of course it won't compete with the high-end scanners like the Xrite iSis or Barbieri LFP that allows Andrew or me to do profiles from thousands of patches with one sheet. Regarding displays, the CM as a spectro will have issues with very dark shadows, and also possibly with precisely situating the emissions of colored LEDs in RGB LED backlight (not white LED) displays. I will be publicly heretic and state that most inkjets block up the extreme dark tones badly so why should you care about shadow rendering, and furthermore if you were the owner of an RGB LED display you probably wouldn't be asking questions here Smiley

Edmund
« Last Edit: July 30, 2011, 03:48:12 AM by eronald » Logged
Mr_S
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« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2011, 05:53:46 AM »
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Just to be a contrarian, if cost is not the immediate issue, I would advocate ColorMunki, and getting the version which can profile prints too. It is a well-known product, which is fairly future proof -immune to changes in display technology-  and the print profiling feature should allow you to choose new papers without fear. If cost is an issue then i1Display Pro is obviously a strong contender. Obviously, both I and Andrew have seen both devices Smiley

Now, there has been a remark that ColorMunki does both screen and print but not very well. This is an interesting remark. CM has got very good reviews from people who used it for paper profiles, but of course it won't compete with the high-end scanners like the Xrite iSis or Barbieri LFP that allows Andrew or me to do profiles from thousands of patches with one sheet. Regarding displays, the CM as a spectro will have issues with very dark shadows, and also possibly with precisely situating the emissions of colored LEDs in RGB LED backlight (not white LED) displays. I will be publicly heretic and state that most inkjets block up the extreme dark tones badly so why should you care about shadow rendering, and furthermore if you were the owner of an RGB LED display you probably wouldn't be asking questions here Smiley

Edmund


Cheers Edmund - I'm not really going to be printing from home and will be using a print shop, so I've gone with the Display Pro...Wil be good to put my mind at rest over my display as I had a slightly dissapointing print come back from the shop - It looked great in terms of print quality but was over saturated and a little milky in contrast...From an old review from Tftcentral.com, they profiled their Dell U2711 and got the colour spot on so am expecting good things...

Cheers and will post back on my results..
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digitaldog
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« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2011, 12:43:08 PM »
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So for basic display calibration, vs. display and print, the ColorMunki does both but not very well ?

IF your goal is the ultimate in display calibration and profiling, you want a Colorimeter and the new (whatever its called) X-Rite instrument is top dog today in its price range. I would not skimp on the software (unless the time comes that smart displays like NEC or Eizo drive these newer devices).  

IF your goal is a good multi-tasker that can handle the displays and build paper profiles, and you are on a budget, then go ColorMunki.
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Andrew Rodney
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Mac Mahon
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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2011, 04:03:12 PM »
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Quote
IF your goal is the ultimate in display calibration and profiling, you want a Colorimeter and the new (whatever its called) X-Rite instrument is top dog today in its price range. I would not skimp on the software (unless the time comes that smart displays like NEC or Eizo drive these newer devices). 

Andrew
Is the CM display hardware the same as the i1 Display Pro hardware?  I already have i1 Profiler with the PhotoPro bundle but have been convinced by the forum that the colorimeter will do a better job on my monitor than the i1Pro.  Do you know if if the CM Display be able to use the Monitor routines in Profiler?
Tim
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keith_cooper
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« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2011, 06:09:13 PM »
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Is the CM display hardware the same as the i1 Display Pro hardware?  I already have i1 Profiler with the PhotoPro bundle but have been convinced by the forum that the colorimeter will do a better job on my monitor than the i1Pro.  Do you know if if the CM Display be able to use the Monitor routines in Profiler?
I've got both bits of hardware, so I thought I'd give it a go :-)

Well... I just fired up a full (everything enabled) version of i1Profiler with a ColorMunki Display plugged in - it just tells me that it can't find an i1Display Pro.

Tried different versions of the 'tray' application and it seems that whilst the sensors may be similar, there is some form of identification used to ensure they will only work as supplied.

I also tried an i1Display Pro sensor with the ColorMunki s/w - nothing going there either...

This was on a Mac Pro - 10.6.8
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K.C.
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« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2011, 08:30:27 PM »
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IF your goal is the ultimate in display calibration and profiling, you want a Colorimeter and the new (whatever its called) X-Rite instrument is top dog today in its price range. I would not skimp on the software (unless the time comes that smart displays like NEC or Eizo drive these newer devices).  

IF your goal is a good multi-tasker that can handle the displays and build paper profiles, and you are on a budget, then go ColorMunki.

Thank you for the clarification.

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Mac Mahon
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« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2011, 08:47:00 PM »
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I've got both bits of hardware, so I thought I'd give it a go :-)

Well... I just fired up a full (everything enabled) version of i1Profiler with a ColorMunki Display plugged in - it just tells me that it can't find an i1Display Pro.

Tried different versions of the 'tray' application and it seems that whilst the sensors may be similar, there is some form of identification used to ensure they will only work as supplied.

I also tried an i1Display Pro sensor with the ColorMunki s/w - nothing going there either...

This was on a Mac Pro - 10.6.8

Keith
Thanks
That's helpful although it does seem a shame to have to buy the Profiler s/w twice! Ho hum!
Tim
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lmwacctg
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« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2011, 12:29:31 PM »
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The EyeOne Display-2 has just been replaced by the EyeOne Display-3 and its a much better instrument!

Its a Colorimeter, its sole task is for calibration of a display. Its the ideal instrument for this task.
The ColorMunki is a Spectrophotometer. Its able to calibrate displays, albeit not to the accuracy in dark colors as a good Colorimeter but it also allows you to build profiles for printers (and for calibrating and profiling a projector). Cost more, does more.

If you don’t have a need to build paper profiles, go with the EyeOne Display-3.

Andrew:

I've noticed you make this point about colorimeter accuracy with dark colors several times. Is there data out there that quantifies the difference between the two devices in this regard? I guess what I'm trying to understand is how big are the differences. I have been using a Color Munki for 2 years now for both my monitor and my printer. I have been very satisfied with the results but would consider a change for monitor profiling.

Thanks,

Don
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digitaldog
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« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2011, 12:31:50 PM »
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Is there data out there that quantifies the difference between the two devices in this regard?

There are the manufacturers published spec’s as well as this:
http://www.lumita.com/site_media/work/whitepapers/files/xrite-wp-3a.pdf
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Andrew Rodney
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lmwacctg
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« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2011, 12:51:50 PM »
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There are the manufacturers published spec’s as well as this:
http://www.lumita.com/site_media/work/whitepapers/files/xrite-wp-3a.pdf

Andrew:

That article is "illuminating" to say the least! Thanks for the reference!

Don
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amoergosum
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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2011, 06:01:54 AM »
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I'm trying to decide between the "ColorMunki Photo" and the "i1Display Pro".
I'm still not sure what the better device is in terms of monitor calibration...

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digitaldog
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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2011, 09:04:40 AM »
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I'm trying to decide between the "ColorMunki Photo" and the "i1Display Pro".
I'm still not sure what the better device is in terms of monitor calibration...

Ah X-Rite sure has not made the naming easy on us.

There have been two previous i1Displays over the years (i1D-1 and i1D-2). I guess we have to assume from this page (http://www.xrite.com/custom_page.aspx?PageID=260) the NEW i1Display Pro is what should be called the i1Display-3! But that’s the hardware you want ideally. The ColorMunki Display is the other device you see on this page, its slower but the big difference is the less capable software that ships with it. You want the faster device not so much because its faster but because the software is far more capable.

The ColorMunki Photo is a Spectrophotometer seen here: http://xritephoto.com/ph_product_overview.aspx?id=1115&catid=149&action=overview
Not to be confused with the ColorMunki Display, the slower colorimeter discussed above. 
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Andrew Rodney
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