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Author Topic: "Computer" glasses  (Read 7784 times)
Schewe
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« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2011, 03:27:05 PM »
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Yeah, as you get older, close focus changes (regardless of whether you are near or far sighted). An occupational prescription comes in VERY handy and cuts down on eye strain. I still have progressive lenses but my distance prescription is set to the computer display distance and my close prescription is reduced further. Actually, my vision has improved over the years to the point where I'm less nearsighted than I used to be. I still have some issue working the back of a camera. In the studio I usually take my glasses off and adjust the diopter in the camera. In the field I usually shoot with glasses so I have to readjust the diopter. Kinda a pain...
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K.C.
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« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2011, 11:54:25 PM »
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I'm amazed that anyone can wear progressives. I got a pair by recommendation, but without an explanation of how limited your peripheral vision would be. I put them on and felt like I was in a tunnel. I handed them back to the optician and ordered reading, computer and long distance glasses. It may be a hassle but it beats loosing my peripheral view.

Another important point is finding the right height for your monitor once you get the right glasses.

My understanding is that ergonomically our heads are meant to be tilted/looking slightly downward, not straight at the monitor.


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Schewe
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« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2011, 12:14:38 AM »
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My understanding is that ergonomically our heads are meant to be tilted/looking slightly downward, not straight at the monitor.

I don't disagree with the above...(although I have no problem with progressives). My displays are raised a bit so that my eye line is slightly above the center line. That makes looking through my distance prescription just about perfect for viewing the display.
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Farmer
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« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2011, 06:00:28 AM »
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http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/monitor/

That's some good general advice regarding positioning of your monitor/you.  FWIW, I'm certified in work place health and safety by my state government, and the above matches with all current recommendations that I've seen.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2011, 08:29:35 AM »
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My experience is similar to KCs. I tried progressives for a while several years ago and then went back to a combination of trifocals (for "outdoors") and bifocals (for "indoors": the upper, mid-range part is perfect for the computer and for reading music, while the lower part is just right for close reading.

Using the trifocals on the computer means I strain my neck moving my head up and down for each linbe, since the mid-range section is too small.

If you don't need multi-focal lenses, as I do, a dedicated single-focus pair measured for your computer screen to eye distance is the way to go.
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MrIconoclast
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« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2011, 09:54:51 AM »
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Like many people I find the variabe lenses to be a compromise that works most of the time but not very well for long periods in front of a computer screen or book.  I had my optician measure the working distance when I use a computer and when I read.  For me it is about the same, so I am hoping one set of glasses will work for both.   But he mentioned that for some people they like a monitor about two feet away, but often read with the book 6 inches a way.   They may need two sets of special glasses or bifocal reading/computer glasses. It gets complicated.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2011, 02:44:52 PM »
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Like many people I find the variabe lenses to be a compromise that works most of the time but not very well for long periods in front of a computer screen or book.  I had my optician measure the working distance when I use a computer and when I read.  For me it is about the same, so I am hoping one set of glasses will work for both.   But he mentioned that for some people they like a monitor about two feet away, but often read with the book 6 inches a way.   They may need two sets of special glasses or bifocal reading/computer glasses. It gets complicated.
Yes indeed. I'm one of those for whom it gets complicated. Ideally I'd have one pair of glasses set to 20" for computer and another at about 10" for reading. I'd still need bifocals for driving a car or I wouldn't be able to read the trip meter or speedometer with only dintance glasses.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #27 on: August 09, 2011, 05:45:03 PM »
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I'm amazed that anyone can wear progressives. I got a pair by recommendation, but without an explanation of how limited your peripheral vision would be. I put them on and felt like I was in a tunnel. I handed them back to the optician and ordered reading, computer and long distance glasses. It may be a hassle but it beats loosing my peripheral view.

Another important point is finding the right height for your monitor once you get the right glasses.

My understanding is that ergonomically our heads are meant to be tilted/looking slightly downward, not straight at the monitor.




My Progs are pretty decent, once I found the correct placement of the lenses. I do tend to hold my head down and my monitor is quite low .  The problem was they wanted to fit my lenses with my head held totally erect and the resulting glasses just did not work well.  It took a couple of tries to get it right and I must keep them aware when fitting new frames and lenses. 
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K.C.
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« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2011, 02:16:05 AM »
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http://www.healthycomputing.com/office/setup/monitor/

That's some good general advice regarding positioning of your monitor/you.  FWIW, I'm certified in work place health and safety by my state government, and the above matches with all current recommendations that I've seen.

This is consistent with everything I've read, having done pretty extensive research.

"The ideal viewing height is to have your eyes level with an imaginary line across the screen, about 2"-3" below the top of the monitor."

Thanks for the link.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2011, 11:02:43 AM »
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Oh lord, yes! I have "computer glasses" that are bifocals, with the lower section for close reading and the upper section for monitor-distance (I normally wear trifocals). Well worth the cost.
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Peter
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2011, 05:16:49 PM »
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I do. Jeff Schewe introduced me to this idea a few years back.  i was skeptical before trying it but it has been a real help, especially with  big displays.
I have a pair of bifocals specifically for working at my computer, top is calibrated for distance to the screen, bottom for distance to the keyboard or reading area in front of me.  Optometrist had me measure the exact distances when I was comfortable to the screen and keyboard when working. Works very well when looking at a small test print in front of me while trying to finalize something on the file.
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Craig Lamson
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« Reply #31 on: August 12, 2011, 08:01:35 PM »
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I got mine today.  I'm quite happy based on the limited time using them.  I think they will turn out to be a great investment.
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